5.6 Beyond HPRP: Sustaining Rapid Re-Housing and Prevention Programs
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5.6 Beyond HPRP: Sustaining Rapid Re-Housing and Prevention Programs

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5.6 Beyond HPRP: Sustaining Rapid Re-Housing and Prevention Programs...

5.6 Beyond HPRP: Sustaining Rapid Re-Housing and Prevention Programs

Speaker: Terry Allebaugh

As the resources from the stimulus-funded Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) diminish, communities are faced with finding new ways to keep their HPRP-funded programs running. In this workshop, presenters will share creative strategies to preserve and maintain rapid re-housing and prevention efforts.

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  • As the resources from the stimulus-funded Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) diminish, communities are faced with finding new ways to keep their HPRP-funded programs running. Here is how Housing for New Hope, in Durham/Chapel Hill, NC, strategies are preserving and maintaining rapid re-housing and prevention programs continued federal support.
  • Shifting community model to re-housing: had permanent supportive; but had been reliant solely on site-based transitional housing prior to HPRP; new model to utilize transitional structures for single/families with higher level barriers. Local Evidence of Success: Local evidence of the success of this program model can be seen through the work of Durham’s Re-Housing Team, which has effectively implemented a rapid re-housing program. The re-housing work has been funded through the Homeless Prevention Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP) with funding provided through President Obama’s Stimulus Program and managed locally by Housing for New Hope (HNH). HNH received funds from both the City and State HPRP funds. From January 2010 through December, 2011 the three-person Re-Housing Team of Housing for New Hope has assisted 143 households transition from homelessness to their own homes. Those receiving assistance included 60 individuals and 83 family households, including 187 children for a total of 348 people.  
  • Transitions to Permanence (TOP) Collaborative Decided to focus on families with a goal of serving 40 families per year (2011 Point in Time count was 44 families down from 51 in 2010, a 14% reduction due to HPRP primarily. Thought the focus could move us toward ending child and family homelessness in Durham. 4 Emergency and Transitional Providers partnered with Housing for New Hope along 12 other service providers including employment, mental and primary health, social services, to develop plan. Average length of support will be for 6 months, could go as long a year for some families.  Sought funding in 2011 round of CoC funding under the Transition in Place model. Have a newly formed governing and scoring committee, very confusing process, another project recommended for top spot, but we did get to present at public forum and people were beginning to understandAwarded $100,000 grant from foundation that loved our collaborationHave strong interest from another foundation who heard about the first and considering.An international corporation has invited to apply for a grant; they loved collaboration, plus proven track model, plus possible leverage of their money for public money, plus advocacy workAre slated for assistance from reallocated HPRP funds on both state and local level, and for possible funding via supplemental ESG the same.Strength of public/private partnership on this project-one leveraging the other 
  • Seductive to FundersCorporate (Cisco)Foundation (KBR)Government (City/County)Faith CommunityOrganizations
  • Durham Congregations, Associations, and Neighborhoods (CAN) is Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations and Neighborhoods) is a multi-racial, multi-faith, strictly non-partisan, countywide citizens’ organization. CAN is affiliated with the Industrial Areas Foundation (IAF), the oldest and largest national, congregation-based, community organizing network in the United States.  CAN leaders translate deeply felt concerns into real innovative solutions that benefit the whole community, such as lead abatement in homes with children under six, a living wage for City and County employees, a rental inspection program, and now a re-housing program and jobs employment program. Candidates committed to fund or find funding to assist at least 40 families a year at total budget of $400,000 move from shelter and homelessness into their own housing in a program based on the HPRP success model. Now meeting the elected officials, including the Mayor who made the pledge. 
  • Collaboration to implement program; continue collaboration to sustain

5.6 Beyond HPRP: Sustaining Rapid Re-Housing and Prevention Programs Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Housing for New Hope Preventing and Ending Homelessness, One Valuable Person at a TimePerseverance for Permanence
  • 2. Re-Housing Results Homeless Prevention Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP)  State and City Entitlement Funding Pilot Project  Department of Social Services – Prevention  Housing for New Hope – Re-Housing  Outcomes  Prevention  Re-Housing  Point-in-TimeHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 3. Re-Housing Works! Prevention  Assisted 146 households (families & individuals)  Average assistance per household: $1,265 (maximum of 3 months) Re-Housing  Assisted 143 households transition from homelessness to their own homes  Those receiving assistance included 60 individuals and 83 family households, including 187 children for a total of 348 people  Cost to date:  $960,000 (Direct support $515,000 + operational $445,000)  Per household $6,713 Point-in-Time  After one year of HPRP, the number of homeless families decreased by 14% (Point In Time Jan. 2010 – Jan. 2011)Housing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 4. Lessons Learned Target families Recruit additional collaborators Strengthen access to jobs Enhance case management Secure both private and public funding Provide a new model for DurhamHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 5. What’s the Plan? Transition-In-Place = Transition to Permanence (TOP) Collaborative 40 families will leave homelessness into leases  Leasing assistance and supportive service (3-12 months) Scattered site housing within the community TOP Features:  Coordinated intake & assessment  Housing placement & subsidy  Ongoing case management  Evolving role of transitional housingHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 6. How Are We Going To Pay For It? Reallocated HPRP Funding Private Funding  Collaboration is Key  Proven model = Confidence + Comfort  Leverage public funding  Circles of supports & donated furnishings Government Funding  Emergency Solutions Grant (ESG)  Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)  City/County FundsHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 7. Creating Political Will Durham CAN (Congregations, Associations and Neighborhoods) solicits support from candidates for public office for community improvements  Fund or find funding to assist at least 40 families a year at total budget of $400,000 move from shelter and homelessness into their own housing in a program based on the HPRP success model.  Provide job readiness training and placement for 25 adults participating in Re-Housing  Now meeting the elected officials, including the Mayor who made the pledge.Housing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 8. Collaboration is Key! Urban Ministries of Durham - shelter  Vocational Rehabilitation - job Durham Interfaith Hospitality training and placement Network - shelter  Durham Department of Social Genesis Home - Transitional Socials - entitlements, plus possible housing TANF in the future Durham Housing Authority -  Durham Congregations in Action - housing job readiness training underwriting Durham Crisis Response Center -  Congregations - furnishings and transitional housing for victims of housewarming gifts, and support domestic violence teams City of Durham Workforce  The Durham Center - mental health Development - assisted employment,  Lincoln Community Health Center - training and placement primary health Durham Technical Community  Durham’s System of Care - College - job readiness coordinated network of servicesHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 9. Re-Housing to PermanenceHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 10. Re-Housing to PermanenceHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 11. Contact Information Terry Allebaugh Executive Director Housing for New Hope 18 West Colony Place Suite 250 Durham NC 27705 (919) 489-6282 terry@housingfornewhope.orgHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org
  • 12. Re-Housing to PermanenceHousing for New Hope www.HousingforNewHope.org