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 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
 	 4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability  (Silber)
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4.3 Working with Landlords to Maintain Housing Stability (Silber)

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Success in preventing homelessness and achieving rapid re-housing relies on developing and maintaining strong relationships with landlords. This workshop will discuss how to reach out and build …

Success in preventing homelessness and achieving rapid re-housing relies on developing and maintaining strong relationships with landlords. This workshop will discuss how to reach out and build working relationships with landlords, whether individuals or for-profit or not-for-profit entities. Consideration will be given to walking the fine line between acting as a liaison to landlords and being a consumer advocate when tenants have legal conflicts with property owners or requests for reasonable accommodations with property owners.

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  • 1. Building and Maintaining Relationships with Landlords: Focus on Rapid Re-Housing Minozka King Silber Housing Specialist Community of Hope July 13th , 2010
  • 2. Background: Community of Hope <ul><li>Work to improve the health and quality of life for low-income, homeless and underserved families and individuals in the District of Columbia. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide housing and supportive services to homeless families. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide healthcare to individuals with little or no insurance. </li></ul><ul><li>Community clinic, temporary, transitional, HPRP, and permanent supportive housing, all of which include a range of case management and supportive services. </li></ul>
  • 3. Housing Specialist <ul><li>Develop/maintain good working relationships with property managers to ease and expedite the application process for our clients. </li></ul><ul><li>Build an extensive database to facilitate the rapid re-housing process for our clients. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide property listings to clients based on their needs and income. </li></ul><ul><li>For the purpose of this presentation, I will focus on developing relationships with landlords for short-term programs such as the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP). </li></ul>
  • 4. How to Find Landlords (1) <ul><li>Websites: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Socialserve.com </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>dchousingsearch.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>D.C. Department of Human Services (DHS) Quickbase </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Challenge: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Listings are not updated frequently </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. How to Find Landlords (2) <ul><li>Information I receive from clients and/or case managers </li></ul><ul><li>Landlords who contact the agency and list their properties </li></ul><ul><li>Walk/drive around a particular area </li></ul>
  • 6. Recruiting Landlords: Pros and Cons (1) <ul><li>Assistance is provided for up to 18 months in 3-month increments; ultimate length of subsidy is affected by many factors </li></ul><ul><li>No specific payment standard (i.e., based on rent-reasonableness) </li></ul><ul><li>Many of our clients have extremely low income </li></ul>
  • 7. Recruiting Landlords: Pros and Cons (2) <ul><li>False Advertisement/Scams </li></ul><ul><li>Wanting to obtain too much information about tenants </li></ul><ul><li>Renting from individuals vs. management companies </li></ul>
  • 8. Best Practices: Retaining Landlords <ul><li>Constant contact </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight vital role </li></ul><ul><li>Make them feel like partners in the process </li></ul><ul><li>Educate them on homelessness </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Job loss </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Serious family emergency (e.g., death, illness) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Very low income and high rent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Generational poverty (e.g., first-time renter) </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. Greatest Challenges (1) <ul><li>Short-term program </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only the first (3)three months of subsidy, plus security deposit are guaranteed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some families face major obstacles to achieving self-sufficiency </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finding affordable and safe housing for very low income families </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Program does not pay utilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Units with all utilities included cost more to rent </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Most of our client’s only source of income is TANF </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Greatest Challenges (2) <ul><li>Clients do not have their expected contribution at the time of lease-up </li></ul><ul><li>Re-housing clients with problematic backgrounds: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Criminal records </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Eviction histories and/or open balances with management companies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Extremely bad credit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No credit </li></ul></ul>
  • 11. Outcomes (1) <ul><li>Over 40 families re-housed under HPRP since April 2010 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Average timeframe is 4-5 weeks </li></ul></ul><ul><li>First-time renters </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on education/employment to help them increase benefits and income </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct quarterly tenancy workshops </li></ul>
  • 12. Outcomes (2) <ul><li>Attend all lease-ups with clients </li></ul><ul><li>Security deposit agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Waivers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Application fee </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Security deposit </li></ul></ul><ul><li>List of landlords who accept clients with criminal and/or eviction histories </li></ul>
  • 13. Conclusion <ul><li>Many of the families we serve have only one adult in the home and multiple children under 10 years old. </li></ul><ul><li>These families will require a great deal of assistance/support from their case managers. </li></ul><ul><li>The positive relationships developed with landlords have made it possible for us to re-house over 40 families in the past four months. </li></ul><ul><li>The expected 30% contribution at lease-up continues to be an issue with our re-housing clients. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, it would be very helpful if federal or local housing agencies waived the first month client contribution for HPRP clients. </li></ul>
  • 14. Contact Information <ul><li>Minozka King Silber </li></ul><ul><li>Housing Specialist </li></ul><ul><li>Community of Hope </li></ul><ul><li>1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW </li></ul><ul><li>Suite 805 </li></ul><ul><li>Washington, DC 20036 </li></ul><ul><li>202.407.7775 Direct line </li></ul><ul><li>202.232.1014 Fax </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>

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