WORKSHOP AGENDA <ul><li>Who we serve – new data available from supplemental Veterans Chapter to the 2009 AHAR. </li></ul><...
Secretary Shinseki’s Goal:  End Homelessness Among Veterans in 5 Years <ul><li>“ We will provide new help for homeless Vet...
VA’s Five Year Plan to End Homelessness Among Veterans <ul><li>To end homelessness among Veterans, we must be able to effe...
Veterans Chapter for 2009 AHAR <ul><li>Based on the Point-In-Time (PIT) count, on a single night in January 2009, an estim...
Location of Homeless Veterans <ul><li>Almost half of homeless veterans on a given night were located in four states: Calif...
Poverty and Homelessness <ul><li>Veterans are less likely to be poor than the general population (6% vs. 13%), but among t...
Women, Families, and Homelessness <ul><li>Female veterans are twice as likely to be in the homeless population as they are...
Social Isolation <ul><li>Homeless veterans appear to be more socially isolated than the general homeless population, with ...
Homeless Veterans are Older Than General Homeless Population <ul><li>Homeless veterans are older and are more disabled. Ab...
Age Distribution 25.5% 51.8% 19.2% 3.5% 7.2% 39.1% 9.2% 44.5% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 30 years and younge...
Engaging the Veteran <ul><li>Understanding Veteran needs is a complex task that requires engagement with the individual. <...
CHALENG Assesses Needs <ul><li>CHALENG asks consumers and providers what they think. Report available at  www.va.gov/homel...
<ul><li>Non-Veteran Consumer  </li></ul><ul><li>(7 domains) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Long-term housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
Top Ten Highest  Unmet  Needs as Ranked by Consumers by Housing Status (FY 2009) Veterans who are Literally Homeless (n=2,...
Family Composition & Needs <ul><li>Who are we serving? </li></ul><ul><li>What does a household  </li></ul><ul><li>look lik...
HUD-VASH <ul><ul><ul><li>Largest permanent, supportive housing initiative for homeless Veterans. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><...
HUD-VASH <ul><li>Families can be served and are an important target group. </li></ul><ul><li>21,078 placed in Section 8 as...
Supportive Services for Veterans Families (SSVF) <ul><li>Goal of SSVF Program  </li></ul><ul><li>Provide housing stability...
<ul><li>Required Supportive Services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Outreach services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Case management s...
<ul><li>Optional Supportive Services: </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary financial assistance payments  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pay...
<ul><li>Goals and Objectives for Awards under NOFA </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance the housing stability and independent living ...
Accessing Mainstream  Resources <ul><li>Income supports including food stamps, SSI/SSD, TANF, Medicaid/Medicare </li></ul>...
National Call Center <ul><li>  Homeless Veteran in need of help?  Call 1-877-4AID VET (1-877-424-3838) </li></ul><ul><li>T...
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3.4 Ending Homelessness for Veterans and their Families

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Part 2 of 2 of John Kuhn's presentation on homeless veterans and their families.

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3.4 Ending Homelessness for Veterans and their Families

  1. 1. WORKSHOP AGENDA <ul><li>Who we serve – new data available from supplemental Veterans Chapter to the 2009 AHAR. </li></ul><ul><li>What are their needs, defined not only by providers, but also by consumers. </li></ul><ul><li>What unique services has the VA developed or is developing to help target populations address these needs. </li></ul>
  2. 2. Secretary Shinseki’s Goal: End Homelessness Among Veterans in 5 Years <ul><li>“ We will provide new help for homeless Veterans because those heroes have a home – it’s the country they served, the United States of America. And until we reach a day when not a single Veteran sleeps on the street our business is unfinished.” </li></ul><ul><li> - President Barack Obama </li></ul>
  3. 3. VA’s Five Year Plan to End Homelessness Among Veterans <ul><li>To end homelessness among Veterans, we must be able to effectively and efficiently target resources and design programs. First step is funding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who these Veterans are. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Where they are found. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are their needs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opening Doors : </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Objective 2: Strengthen the capacity of public and private organizations by increasing knowledge about collaboration, homelessness, and successful interventions to prevent and end it.” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Federal cooperation in data gathering and program design . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>VA –HUD coordination in HMIS and PIT counts. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Veterans Chapter for 2009 AHAR <ul><li>Based on the Point-In-Time (PIT) count, on a single night in January 2009, an estimated 75,609 Veterans were homeless. </li></ul><ul><li>136,334 Veterans spent at least one night in an emergency shelter or transitional housing between October 1, 2008 and September 30, 2009. </li></ul><ul><li>Veterans are overrepresented among the homeless population. The PIT found that 12% of all people (and 16% of adults) experiencing homelessness are Veterans. Less than 8% of the total U.S. population has Veteran status. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Location of Homeless Veterans <ul><li>Almost half of homeless veterans on a given night were located in four states: California, Florida, Texas, and New York. Only 28% of all veterans were located in those same four states. </li></ul><ul><li>The share of homeless veterans located in the densest urban areas (or principal cities) is more than twice that of all veterans (72% compared to 31%). </li></ul><ul><li>During the course of the year, 81% used shelter. 33% of veterans experiencing homelessness stayed in emergency shelter for less than one week, 61% stayed less than one month, and more than 84% veterans stayed in emergency shelter for less than 3 months. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Poverty and Homelessness <ul><li>Veterans are less likely to be poor than the general population (6% vs. 13%), but among the poor: </li></ul><ul><li>10% of veterans in poverty became homeless at some point during the year, compared to just over 5% of adults in poverty. </li></ul><ul><li>Rates of homelessness among veterans living in poverty are particularly high for veterans identifying as Hispanic/Latino (1 in 4) or African American (1 in 4). </li></ul><ul><li>Women are almost three (2.7) times more likely to be in the homeless population than in the female poverty population. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Women, Families, and Homelessness <ul><li>Female veterans are twice as likely to be in the homeless population as they are to be in the U.S. adult female population. </li></ul><ul><li>Only 4% of Veterans were homeless as part of a family. The proportion of veterans served as members of families is much lower than the non-veteran sheltered adult population; about 20% of non-veteran sheltered adults experience homelessness as part of a family. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Social Isolation <ul><li>Homeless veterans appear to be more socially isolated than the general homeless population, with weaker family and social support systems. Their entry into shelter reflects this isolation. </li></ul><ul><li>Veterans were less likely than non-veterans to have come from housing—either their own unit or that of a friend or family member. Approximately 32% of veterans came from housing compared to 42% of non-veterans. </li></ul><ul><li>Of those coming from housing, veterans were more likely than nonveterans to come from their own unit (40% compared to 26%) and less likely to have been doubled up with friends or family: 58% compared to 73% for non-veterans. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Homeless Veterans are Older Than General Homeless Population <ul><li>Homeless veterans are older and are more disabled. About 53% of individual homeless veterans have disabilities, compared with 41% of sheltered homeless non-veteran individuals. </li></ul><ul><li>This reflects the overall veteran population which has a higher average age than the general, adult population. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Age Distribution 25.5% 51.8% 19.2% 3.5% 7.2% 39.1% 9.2% 44.5% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 30 years and younger 31-50 years 51-61 years 62 years and older Non-Veteran Veteran <ul><ul><li>Exhibit 3-3: Age Distribution of Sheltered Homeless Individual Veteran and Non-Veteran Individual Adults </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Engaging the Veteran <ul><li>Understanding Veteran needs is a complex task that requires engagement with the individual. </li></ul><ul><li>We begin with a recognition that every person/family who is homeless has different concerns and needs to be addressed. These concerns may not match agency/provider interests. </li></ul><ul><li>Recovery is seen within the model as a personal journey that may involve developing hope, a secure base and sense of self, supportive relationships, empowerment, social inclusion, coping skills, and meaning. </li></ul>
  12. 12. CHALENG Assesses Needs <ul><li>CHALENG asks consumers and providers what they think. Report available at www.va.gov/homeless </li></ul><ul><li>Local VA use opportunity to assess local needs and plan </li></ul>Completed CHALENG Surveys 2005-2009
  13. 13. <ul><li>Non-Veteran Consumer </li></ul><ul><li>(7 domains) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Long-term housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mental health </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dental </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Job assistance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Substance abuse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Rosenheck & Lam, 1997) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Veteran Consumer </li></ul><ul><li>(From 42 possible needs) </li></ul><ul><li>Welfare payments </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for child support issues </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term, permanent housing </li></ul><ul><li>Child care </li></ul><ul><li>SSI/SSD process </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for outstanding warrants/fines </li></ul><ul><li>Guardianship (financial) </li></ul><ul><li>Family reconciliation assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Job training </li></ul><ul><li>VA disability/pension </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Perception of Unmet Needs Among People Who Experience Homelessness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(Kuhn & Nakashima, 2010) </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Top Ten Highest Unmet Needs as Ranked by Consumers by Housing Status (FY 2009) Veterans who are Literally Homeless (n=2,866) Veterans in Transitional Housing (VA Grant and Per Diem and Domiciliary (n=4,984) Veterans in Permanent Housing (including HUD-VASH) (n=1,700) <ul><li>Long-term, permanent housing </li></ul><ul><li>Dental Care </li></ul><ul><li>Welfare payments </li></ul><ul><li>VA disability/pension </li></ul><ul><li>SSI/SSD process </li></ul><ul><li>Job finding </li></ul><ul><li>Job training </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for outstanding warrants/fines </li></ul><ul><li>Guardianship (financial) </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for child support issues </li></ul><ul><li>Welfare payments </li></ul><ul><li>Child care </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for child support issues </li></ul><ul><li>Family reconciliation assistance </li></ul><ul><li>SSI/SSD process </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term, permanent housing </li></ul><ul><li>Guardianship (financial) </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for outstanding warrants/fines </li></ul><ul><li>Credit Counseling </li></ul><ul><li>Job training </li></ul><ul><li>Dental care </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for outstanding warrants/fines </li></ul><ul><li>Welfare payments </li></ul><ul><li>Legal assistance for child support issues </li></ul><ul><li>Job finding </li></ul><ul><li>Job training </li></ul><ul><li>VA disability/pension </li></ul><ul><li>Credit counseling </li></ul><ul><li>SSI/SSD process </li></ul><ul><li>Child care </li></ul>
  15. 15. Family Composition & Needs <ul><li>Who are we serving? </li></ul><ul><li>What does a household </li></ul><ul><li>look like? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the needs of </li></ul><ul><li>families? </li></ul><ul><li>Who defines that need? </li></ul>
  16. 16. HUD-VASH <ul><ul><ul><li>Largest permanent, supportive housing initiative for homeless Veterans. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Provides housing (HUD) with case management (VA) and supportive services (VA) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>30,000 Housing Choice vouchers offered through 301 participating PHAs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Almost 1,000 case managers provide case management and supportive services designed to promote housing stability and recovery. </li></ul></ul></ul>HUD-VASH
  17. 17. HUD-VASH <ul><li>Families can be served and are an important target group. </li></ul><ul><li>21,078 placed in Section 8 as December 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>13.8% of all placements to families with children </li></ul><ul><li>11.5% of all placements to women (compared to 6.6% served in all VA specialized homeless services) </li></ul><ul><li>In FY 08, 5.1% of all homeless veterans served were women. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Supportive Services for Veterans Families (SSVF) <ul><li>Goal of SSVF Program </li></ul><ul><li>Provide housing stability to homeless and at-risk Veterans and their families . Modeled after HUD’s HPRP initiative. </li></ul><ul><li>Process </li></ul><ul><li>VA will award grants to grantees (private non-profit organizations and consumer cooperatives) </li></ul><ul><li>Grantees will provide supportive services to very low-income Veterans and their families who are homeless or at-risk of homelessness </li></ul>
  19. 19. <ul><li>Required Supportive Services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Outreach services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Case management services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assist participants to obtain VA benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assist participants to obtain and coordinate the provision of other public benefits provided by Federal, State, or local agencies, or any eligible entity in the area or community served by the grantee (provided directly or through referral to partner agencies) </li></ul></ul>Supportive Services for Veterans Families (SSVF) <ul><li>Housing counseling services </li></ul><ul><li>Health care services </li></ul><ul><li>Personal financial planning services </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation services </li></ul><ul><li>Income support services </li></ul><ul><li>Fiduciary and representative payee services </li></ul><ul><li>Legal services </li></ul><ul><li>Child care </li></ul><ul><li>Daily living services </li></ul>
  20. 20. <ul><li>Optional Supportive Services: </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary financial assistance payments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Payments must help participants remain in or obtain permanent housing and can be for the following purposes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Payments must include the development of sustainability plan and payments can only be made to third parties. May constitute up to 30% of grant award. </li></ul></ul>Supportive Services (cont’d) <ul><li>Rent, penalties, or fees </li></ul><ul><li>Utility fees </li></ul><ul><li>Security or utility deposits </li></ul><ul><li>Moving costs </li></ul><ul><li>Purchase of emergency supplies </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Child care </li></ul>
  21. 21. <ul><li>Goals and Objectives for Awards under NOFA </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance the housing stability and independent living skills of very low-income Veteran families occupying permanent housing across geographic regions </li></ul><ul><li>Rapidly re-house or prevent homelessness among the following target populations who also meet all requirements for being part of a very low-income Veteran family occupying permanent housing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Veteran families earning less than 30% of area median income (AMI) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Veterans with at least one dependent family member </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Chronically homeless Veteran families </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Formerly chronically homeless Veteran families </li></ul></ul>VA’s Goals & Objectives
  22. 22. Accessing Mainstream Resources <ul><li>Income supports including food stamps, SSI/SSD, TANF, Medicaid/Medicare </li></ul><ul><li>National Foundation for Credit Counseling, www.nfcc.org , a counselor can be reached at (800)388-2227 </li></ul><ul><li>Legal Assistance at low cost www.lawhelp.org , http://statesidelegal.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>Available income, health, educational and other supportive services benefits http://www.govbenefits.gov </li></ul>
  23. 23. National Call Center <ul><li>  Homeless Veteran in need of help?  Call 1-877-4AID VET (1-877-424-3838) </li></ul><ul><li>The Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) has founded a National Call Center for Homeless Veterans hotline to ensure that homeless Veterans or Veterans at-risk for homelessness have free, 24/7 access to trained counselors. The hotline is intended to assist homeless Veterans and their families, VA Medical Centers, federal, state and local partners, community agencies, service providers  and others in the community.  </li></ul>

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