Effective
Re-Housing Strategies
        National Alliance to End Homelessness
     National Conference on Ending Homelessn...
BASIC COMPONENTS of the
Rapid Rehousing/Housing First Approach



Crisis Intervention and Short-Term Stabilization
Intake,...
This approach to ending homelessness helps homeless
families & individuals (including those with special
needs) to move in...
MAKING RENTAL
 HOUSING MORE
  AFFORDABLE
ACCESSING SECTION 8

Due to the high cost of rental housing in most rental
markets, it is essential to develop working
col...
When there are no Section 8 vouchers
available, alternative sources of funding
for rent subsidies can often be developed.
Some states and local jurisdictions are using
TANF-funded or HOME-funded subsidies.

These funds may serve as “bridge” or ...
Many communities are experimenting
with short-term and/or shallow rent
subsidies, using public, private, and/or
faith-base...
Subsidized Housing Resources

There are a number of additional ways that housing subsidies
can supplement the cost of hous...
Assistance
    Accessing
  & Moving Into
Permanent Housing
NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES &
Landlord Incentive/Protection Efforts
Persuading landlords to rent to homeless families &
individ...
Outreach to the Real Estate Industry
 Strong, targeted communication is essential in obtaining
 participation from landlor...
Incentives or finders fees for leasable apartments.

Landlord recruitment campaigns.

Tools for improved landlord communic...
MARKETING TO LANDLORDS

Know What You Are “Selling”
Develop Marketing Materials
Emphasize Program Benefits
   Pre-screened...
Monetary Incentives and Protections
 Tenant-based rent subsidies.

 Rent deposits (for instance triple deposits for high r...
Tenant Supports
Supportive services that provide housing stability and an
interface between the landlord and client have b...
Examples of tenant supports for
high risk or special needs populations:
 Strong on-site or off-site case management.

 Ten...
Facilitating Shared Living Arrangements:

  Homeless family or individual may be assisted in moving
  into a rental unit w...
Leaseholder Considerations


     Conventional lease

         Co-lease

        Master-lease
Master Leasing
A social services agency or housing provider leases individual
units, blocks of units, single-family homes,...
Advantages of Master-Leasing
As primary lease-holder, the social service or housing provider
agency assumes responsibility...
It also is effectives in cases where owners have vacant
structures and have not yet determined its use or the extent of
re...
Using Master-Leased Housing
                as Emergency Shelter

  Scattered-site apartments in the community at-large ca...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

3.11 Effective Re-Housing Strategies (Tull)

701
-1

Published on

This workshop will examine strategies local providers are using to rapidly re-house individuals and families with significant barriers to housing. Speakers will discuss negotiation strategies used when working with landlords, facilitating shared living arrangements, and homelessness diversion.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
701
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

3.11 Effective Re-Housing Strategies (Tull)

  1. 1. Effective Re-Housing Strategies National Alliance to End Homelessness National Conference on Ending Homelessness July 13, 2010, Washington DC Presented by Beyond Shelter 1200 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 600 Los Angeles, CA 90017
  2. 2. BASIC COMPONENTS of the Rapid Rehousing/Housing First Approach Crisis Intervention and Short-Term Stabilization Intake, Assessment & Planning Assistance Moving into Permanent Housing Home-Based Case Management (time limited & transitional or long term)
  3. 3. This approach to ending homelessness helps homeless families & individuals (including those with special needs) to move into permanent housing as quickly as possible – and then offers home-based services (time- limited & transitional or sometimes longer-term) to help them stabilize & prevent recidivism. Permanent housing may be of many different types, including housing in the private rental market made affordable through a rent subsidy.
  4. 4. MAKING RENTAL HOUSING MORE AFFORDABLE
  5. 5. ACCESSING SECTION 8 Due to the high cost of rental housing in most rental markets, it is essential to develop working collaborations with local housing authorities. This often requires new dialogue and innovative planning with housing authority administration. Do not assume that it cannot be done. Sometimes there are special “set asides” or preferences that can be developed (particularly for families and/or people with special needs).
  6. 6. When there are no Section 8 vouchers available, alternative sources of funding for rent subsidies can often be developed.
  7. 7. Some states and local jurisdictions are using TANF-funded or HOME-funded subsidies. These funds may serve as “bridge” or stand- alone subsidies. Other communities are using state and/or local trust fund dollars to provide rental assistance.
  8. 8. Many communities are experimenting with short-term and/or shallow rent subsidies, using public, private, and/or faith-based dollars, often combined with workforce development strategies.
  9. 9. Subsidized Housing Resources There are a number of additional ways that housing subsidies can supplement the cost of housing, including: Project-based subsidies to supplement tenant rent Master leasing Developer set-asides of new units for program participants Project based set-asides of existing units
  10. 10. Assistance Accessing & Moving Into Permanent Housing
  11. 11. NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES & Landlord Incentive/Protection Efforts Persuading landlords to rent to homeless families & individuals through landlord outreach. This effort often includes offering incentives to landlords or setting policies to overcome concerns that might prevent a landlord from providing a rental unit to a homeless person or family unit.
  12. 12. Outreach to the Real Estate Industry Strong, targeted communication is essential in obtaining participation from landlords. Some communities have been able to develop partnerships with landlord associations. Other communities have developed relationships with property owners who will provide advice to program administrators. Provision of educational services for real estate brokers about particular programs and services of negotiating agency.
  13. 13. Incentives or finders fees for leasable apartments. Landlord recruitment campaigns. Tools for improved landlord communication. Support for the development of relationships with landlord associations. Involvement of landlords as advisors to design and evaluate programs. Hotline for landlords for crisis resources.
  14. 14. MARKETING TO LANDLORDS Know What You Are “Selling” Develop Marketing Materials Emphasize Program Benefits Pre-screened Tenants Non-Financial Incentives Financial Incentives Case Management Support
  15. 15. Monetary Incentives and Protections Tenant-based rent subsidies. Rent deposits (for instance triple deposits for high risk tenants). Finders fees & lease signing bonuses. Holding fees (payment of rent while tenant is clearing credit checks or in crisis beds or treatment temporarily). Public loans to rehabilitate structures. Use of public assistance funds and Social Security Insurance payments for rent.
  16. 16. Tenant Supports Supportive services that provide housing stability and an interface between the landlord and client have been effective in encouraging landlords to rent to people with special needs. Landlords often view tenants who have access to strong supportive services as less of a financial risk. Service providers often build relationships with willing landlords, who in turn rent to their clients because of the trust that has been built between the two entities. Evidence that a tenant will be provided an array of services and will have frequent contact with case managers can ease a landlord’s concern over protecting other tenants and their property.
  17. 17. Examples of tenant supports for high risk or special needs populations: Strong on-site or off-site case management. Tenant education on landlord/tenant rights/obligations, budgeting skills, credit counseling, and repair, etc. Support groups and mental health and chemical dependency treatment and counseling. Payment for back rent to offset debt or other financial risk considerations (i.e. damage to apartment).
  18. 18. Facilitating Shared Living Arrangements: Homeless family or individual may be assisted in moving into a rental unit with non-homeless relatives or friends (assistance is provided in leasing larger unit responsive to the needs of all). Sometimes friends who meet in homeless programs attempt to lease permanent housing together; this takes great effort, however, to ensure shared values, compatible housekeeping and/or parenting styles, & “house rules” that all can agree upon.
  19. 19. Leaseholder Considerations Conventional lease Co-lease Master-lease
  20. 20. Master Leasing A social services agency or housing provider leases individual units, blocks of units, single-family homes, or an entire building. The agency is the lease-holder and assumes responsibility. The units are then sub-leased at an affordable cost to program participants. Master leasing works best in communities with an active market in residential rental properties in healthy neighborhoods.
  21. 21. Advantages of Master-Leasing As primary lease-holder, the social service or housing provider agency assumes responsibility for rent, damages, etc. There is opportunity for a built-in support network when the social services agency is the primary lease-holder and service provider to the tenant. Housing providers can often secure units quickly. Allows residents to build rental history and develop living skills while receiving supportive services. Community acceptance issues can often be avoided by pursuing this strategy. Residents can integrate into the community.
  22. 22. It also is effectives in cases where owners have vacant structures and have not yet determined its use or the extent of rehabilitation to be undertaken. Landlords can receive longterm rent guarantees prior to initiation of the rehabilitation, helping them to obtain financing. Some models include up-front capital payments to the owner to help finance the rehabilitation. To be a successful housing model for those with criminal, drug, mental health, or homelessness histories, support services should also be available that can meet the needs of residents in the leased location(s).
  23. 23. Using Master-Leased Housing as Emergency Shelter Scattered-site apartments in the community at-large can provide more family-friendly shelter options. It can be a cost-effective way to expand access to shelter while permanent housing plans are developed and executed. The model can provide high tolerance shelter for families and individuals with special needs. Families and individuals can often “transiton in place.”
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×