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2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families
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2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families

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2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families …

2.7: Addressing the Substance Abuse Challenges of Homeless Families

Presentation by Susan Dargon Hart

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • 1. Helping Homeless Families Find Their Strength andBuild Stability One Step at a Time Susan Dargon-Hart, LICSW Institute for Health and Recovery susanhart@healthrecovery.org Institute for Health and Recovery
  • 2. Philosophy of Care Hope Rising IHR Video Institute for Health and Recovery
  • 3. Who are our clients?• Homeless families struggling with SUD/COD – Children of clients – Partners not living in the shelter• Temporarily housed in state Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD)-funded motels, shelters, and temporary housing• DHCD/Housing Authority/Housing First Programs Institute for Health and Recovery 3
  • 4. Engagement• Reluctant to meet with yet another provider• Assessment – whole person, family-based, resiliency approach• Children – Present during assessment – Focusing on children’s needs Institute for Health and Recovery 4
  • 5. Goal is to Reduce Harm:Creating a safer environment for ALLfamily members no matter where they are living Institute for Health and Recovery 5
  • 6. Client-Driven Process• Family-based, “home visiting” interventions – Going to where the family is located – Driving family to appointments• Tools integrated from: – MI, Stages of Change, CBT, Care Coordination, SUD/COD psycho- education, SUD/COD treatment, Trauma- Informed Care - Seeking Safety & Nurturing Program Institute for Health and Recovery 6
  • 7. Philosophy of CareRISE is:• Family focused• Evidence-based• Consumer directed• Trauma informed• Culturally relevant• Strength-based• Relationship valuing Institute for Health and Recovery 7
  • 8. Motivational Interviewing• Provide evidence-based practices based on MI• Focuses on strengths and competencies of each person so she/he can become a leader in her/his own service plan and personal progress• Provide MI training to shelter/DHCD staff Institute for Health and Recovery 8
  • 9. Seeking Safety• Cognitive-behavioral integrated, trauma- substance use recovery curriculum, specific strategies and tools to promote physical and emotional safety• Provides tools to avoid/prevent relapse from substance use, mental health issues and trauma• A non-judgmental approach towards active use• RISE conducts Seeking Safety individually• Provides Trauma-Informed Services training to DHCD and shelter staff Institute for Health and Recovery 9
  • 10. The Nurturing Program for Families in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery• Nurturing Program (NP) Parenting group is a well established, evidence-based parenting intervention, on NREPP• Cognitive-behavioral model; encourages women to explore similarities between ways they were parented and ways they are currently parenting• NP curriculum also integrated within individual sessions Institute for Health and Recovery 10
  • 11. “Those who work well, play well, love well, and expect well.” (Werner and Smith, 1982) Institute for Health and Recovery 11
  • 12. Stabilization Skills• Sharing, teaching and modeling life management skills – Better reactions, better results – Motivate to take action around job and/or education – Housing and tenancy skills• Relapse Responsive• Risk Reduction• Treatment retention issues Institute for Health and Recovery 12
  • 13. Graduation• Determine a good time to end services – “They end us” – Mutually agreed closure• Satisfaction Survey Institute for Health and Recovery 13
  • 14. IHR Homeless Services Systems IntegrationAgency Level• Regional cross trainings – SUD, COD, trauma-informed services – Motivational Interviewing – Impact on family & housing stability• TA, support & consultation on families impacted by SUD/CODs, treatment & recovery – Emergency family shelter staff, Transitional Housing, Housing First – Other agencies providing services to homeless families – Domestic Violence organizations – Local child welfare offices Institute for Health and Recovery 14
  • 15. How does this model fit into Healthcare Reform?• Shift model to fit into a traditional 3rd party payer design without losing non-judgmental approach• Using paperwork as engagement tools• Outpatient home-based services• Doing a diagnostic evaluation in a risk reduction framework Institute for Health and Recovery 15
  • 16. How do you engage homeless families? Institute for Health and Recovery

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