1.4 Who Should Get HPRP Assistance: A Discussion on Targeting (doc)
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1.4 Who Should Get HPRP Assistance: A Discussion on Targeting (doc)

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Is your HPRP program serving the right people, at the right time, with the right resources? Early reports on HPRP implementation indicate that many communities are afraid to assist unemployed and ...

Is your HPRP program serving the right people, at the right time, with the right resources? Early reports on HPRP implementation indicate that many communities are afraid to assist unemployed and extremely low income households for fear that they will be unable sustain their housing. Are they missing the boat? This workshop will explore through an interactive discussion the HPRP eligibility and targeting dilemma and offer concrete steps to analyze if your community is targeting well.

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1.4 Who Should Get HPRP Assistance: A Discussion on Targeting (doc) 1.4 Who Should Get HPRP Assistance: A Discussion on Targeting (doc) Document Transcript

  • Who Should Get HPRP Assistance: A Discussion on Targeting Case Studies for Small Group Discussion Case Study #1: Prevention Household Miguel Flores is an unemployed carpenter with two children, a son, 14, that lives with him and a daughter, 8, that lives with her mother but stays with him every other weekend and one evening during the week. He is living in a three bedroom apartment not far from his ex-wife’s apartment to make it easy for the daughter to go back and forth. The unit rents for $1,500 (rent reasonable for the size and location of the unit). The program can help Miguel find a 2 bedroom apartment for $950 in another city but Miguel does not want to move. Miguel is getting unemployment but it is less than he was earning previously. Miguel goes to the Union hall every week to look for work and believes that he will have work soon. He is behind on his rent and has received a notice to pay or quit. Questions: 1. Does the household meet HPRP eligibility criteria (i.e., housing status and the “but for” rule)? What does a program have to assess to determine eligibility? 2. Should Miguel be required to move to get assistance from the program? 3. What does housing stability look like for Miguel?    Case Study #2: Homeless Household Danielle Martin is a single woman with a mental health disability. She receives SSI and is at 20% AMI. She has been homeless in the past but recently she was staying in the living room at her sister’s house (the sister has a family) and paying some of her SSI for rent to her sister. Last week, the sister was told by the landlord that if Danielle didn’t leave he would evict the whole family, so her sister asked her to go. Danielle is now on the wait list for a shelter bed and staying in her car. Questions: 1. Does the household meet the HPRP eligibility criteria? Is the household a good ‘fit’ for rapid re- housing assistance? 2. How would the availability of other housing options affect your decision to assist Danielle? 3. If eligible and accepted into the HPRP program, what strategies should the program use to rehouse Danielle? National Conference on Ending Homelessness Washington DC  July 12, 2010
  • Who Should Get HPRP Assistance: A Discussion on Targeting Case Study #3: Prevention Household Mary Robinson and her five-year-old son are at-risk of eviction. Mary is 3 months behind on rent and 4 months behind on her electric and water bills. Mary is unemployed. She is actively looking for a job but has had no luck due to the economic environment. She and her son moved to the area about a year ago and have no other housing options or support networks to assist with their housing need. She reports income from TANF, SSI (for her son) and is income eligible. She also receives Food Stamps and has $1,000 in her checking account. 1. Does the household meet HPRP eligibility criteria (i.e., housing status and the “but for” rule)? What does a program have to assess to determine eligibility? 2. What types of information would you include in a Housing Stability plan? What does stable housing look like for this family?    Case Study #4: Homeless Household Anna Peters is a teenage mother of one in an emergency shelter. She was ostracized from her family when they found out she was pregnant. Her parents are taking care of her child but she is still estranged from her family and has been living on the streets. She has no working history and no income. She is interested in going to school to finish high-school. She is likely eligible for, but not currently receiving public assistance. She is currently on the waiting list for public housing and it appears likely that unit will become available in next 6-9 months. She wants to move into a hotel until she is able to locate an apartment. 1. Does the household meet the HPRP eligibility criteria? Is the household a good ‘fit’ for rapid re- housing assistance? 2. If eligible and accepted into the HPRP program, what strategies and assistance should the program use to re-house Anna? Can HPRP be used for a hotel/motel voucher while an apartment is being located? 3. What does stable housing look like for this family? National Conference on Ending Homelessness Washington DC  July 12, 2010