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1.12 Examining Community-Wide Housing First Systems for Families (Baker)
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1.12 Examining Community-Wide Housing First Systems for Families (Baker)

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This workshop will examine the steps communities have undertaken to create a homelessness system that rapidly re-houses most families experiencing homelessness. Speakers will discuss the use of a …

This workshop will examine the steps communities have undertaken to create a homelessness system that rapidly re-houses most families experiencing homelessness. Speakers will discuss the use of a centralized intake process, diversion, assessment and targeting, and the delivery of rapid re-housing services. Organizational change will also be discussed.

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  • City’s 10-Year plan finalized in 2005
  • Add flow chart?
  • We do all levels of case management depending on the families’ needs
  • Family Preserv. Funding and PSSF funding are the only two that have remained consistent.
  • Similar shelter rules for all shelters Philosophy re: transitional housing, housing focused based case management, shelter case management Length of time in shelters Rapid Re-housing philosophy
  • Transcript

    • 1. Norfolk’s Central Intake and Progress in Building a Seamless System for Homeless Families Jill Baker July 12, 2010 NAEH Presentation
    • 2. Presentation Overview
      • Background
      • Review of Current System
      • Highlights of Achievements
      • Summary of Recent Policy and Research Advances
      • Lessons Learned
      • Challenges for the Future
    • 3. Background
      • Series of Strategic Meeting in 2006
        • Studied Hennepin County Model
        • Experts from Hennepin invited to Norfolk
        • Workgroup formed to establish MOA unique to the needs of Norfolk
      • Central Intake launched in January 2007
        • Official Press release happened in April 2007
        • NDHS was the designated agency to conduct all intake and assessments.
    • 4. Components of Norfolk’s CI System
      • Homeless Hotline- Information and referral
      • Intake & Assessment/ Crisis Management
      • Prevention- Financial Assistance
      • Shelter Partnership/ Diversionary Placement (family members/friends)
      • Housing Broker Team (Aug. 2007)
      • On Going- In Home Case Management (Sept. 2007)
    • 5. How it all Connects
    • 6. Rapid Exit Client Flow
    • 7. Financial Assistance Funding 2007
      • Comprehensive Services Act- Foster Care Prevention funding source from state
      • Community Development Block Grant
      • HOME
      • Family Preservation
      • Promoting Safe and Stable Families
      • TANF/VIEW
      • Total of $1,157,408
    • 8. Other Funding 2007
      • Intake Assessment- Positions realigned at Department of Human Services
      • Housing Specialist- Local foundation & Human Services Grant (HSG)
      • Ongoing Case Management – Human Services Grant (HSG)
    • 9. Achievements To Date
      • Central Intake, Prevention and Rapid Re-housing launched January 2007 to establish a continuum of services for homeless families.
      • Over 1,600 Hotline Calls received monthly in 2009
      • 233 families seek assistance /month Most receive counseling and case management services
      • 541 families received financial help/ 122 received additional ongoing case management in 2009
      • A Housing Broker Team helps to locate housing and serve as liaison to property owners and managers.
    • 10. Intake and Assessment Fiscal Year Walk-Ins Intakes 2008 3044 1746 2009 2947 1864 2010 2411 1551
    • 11. Hotline Data Calendar Year Calls 2007 12345 2008 13628 2009 19498
    • 12. Shelter Fiscal Year Waiting List Placements 2008 378 150 2009 465 126 2010 407 117
    • 13. Households Assisted Financially *It should be noted that this represents Family households as well as Single adult households with no children *2010 does not include those house holds provided assistance through HPRP funding stream Fiscal Year Households Served 2007 945 2008 537 2009 541 2010 308
    • 14. Program Expenditures Fiscal Year Direct Financial Assistance 2007 $1,157,409 2008 $695,812 2009 $663,991
    • 15. Ongoing Case Management Fiscal Year Referrals from HART 2008 109 2009 122 2010 189
    • 16. 2011 Prevention Funding
      • Family Preservation
      • Promoting Safe and Stable Families
      • VIEW- 37% reduction in funding
      • HOME- 89% reduction in funding
      • CDBG- 100% reduction in funding
      • CSA- 100% reduction in funding
      • HPRP- No allocated funding for CI (funding can be accessed by 6 agencies within and outside of central intake)
    • 17. Other Funding Cuts in
      • Funding for 2 Intake Social Workers lost
      • Funding for 1 Housing Specialist lost
    • 18. Lesson’s Learned
      • If you build it, they will come! Be ready!
      • Target your services and population
      • Engage all family members—no one lives in a vacuum and they want to help.
      • Leverage funding and look for flexible funding sources
      • Buy in from all partners re: philosophy
    • 19. Lessons Learned Con’ted
      • Annual assessment and reassessment of system.
      • Flexibility in folding new funding streams into an existing system
      • Everyone at the table to make any system changes and decisions. Being clear of roles and responsibilities.
    • 20. Something to Consider
      • Housing cost in Norfolk are greater than other Rapid Exit communities throughout the nation.
      Columbus Hennepin Norfolk Apt. Size FMR Housing Wage FMR Housing Wage FMR Housing Wage 0 $508 $9.67 $549 $11.73 $747 $14.40 1 $585 $11.25 $641 $13.83 $820 $15.02 2 $740 $14.23 $786 $16.79 $946 $17.38 3 $931 $17.90 $1028 $21.98 $1243 $23.77
    • 21. Challenges for the Future
      • Political will has changed
      • HPRP stimulus money
      • Increased unemployment rate
      • Rising housing cost
      • Landlord resistance
      • Changes with HEARTH Act