The transformation of Center City Philadelphia                      into a 24 hour downtown
Philadelphia: one of the original colonial cities
William Penn’s grid positioned atnarrowest point between two rivers
Founded 1682: Plan - Center Square + 4 public squares
Enduring urban form: Original city = Center City
Broad & Market Streets
Five public squares
Logan                 FranklinRittenhouse              Washington
Legacy: human-scale, walkable city
While this made us obsolete: 1950s-1970s
Re-infused with value in the post-petroleum age:       Dense, diverse & walkable = sustainable
Inherit an industrial past
Largest 19th century industrial city in North America         With major industries: Stetson Hat Factory
Baldwin Locomotives
Large factories often developers of rowhouses
Gave life to our waterfront
Many small shops across all older neighborhoods;               1906: 16,000 manufacturing plants      Unlike Pittsburgh & ...
Accelerated immediately after World War II       Factories were moving out the city
De-industrialization coincided with America’s       attachment to cheap fuel & large cars
Federal policies that gave priority to the car
Resulted residential abandonment; population loss
Total Population: 1880-2008                      Philadelphia & Its Suburbs            Declining share of regional residen...
Red blighted areas = old manufacturing areas
Sad, vacant ruins visible from Amtrak
P ie r s w e r e le f t t o d e t e r io r a t e
Inherit successful downtown revitalization program                  that has built a post-industrial city
1956: 567 properties designated for preservation
Philadelphia has a long tradition of downtown living
1950s: Creation of modern new Office District
1953: the demolition of “Chinese wall”
Penn Center
1960s & 1970s: all buildings connected to transit
1980s: Linked Pennsylvania & Reading Railroad            into integrated regional rail system
Employers: easy access to 360 degree labor market     295,000 riders/day take transit into downtown
1980s office boom:
1990: 38 million s.f. of office space
Similar process of renewal in University City
Temple University: educational & medical campuses
The emerging employment center at the Navy Yard
All the city’s major employment centers are result                    Of major strategic investments                   55%...
Philadelphia is a major center of office employment
A major center for research & health care
Global center for education
Maintained careful balance of small & large scale
Integrating old & new
1990: A degraded public environment:        Declining resources for cities
Substantial ground & upper floor vacancy
Neglected facades, solid security gates
9 to 5 downtown; empty streets at night
Losing office market share to suburbs
Origin of the CCD: 1990 Recession               • Fiscal crisis               • Declining city services               • Jo...
Creating the Center City DistrictMunicipality Authorities Act of 1945                           1990               • 2,100...
CCD boundaries: 220 blocks, 5,118 properties
1991: Focus on the basics – comprehensive cleaning
65% of survey respondentsSay Center City “much cleaner” than rest of the city
Community Service Representatives                      Deployment                    • 42 CSR’s                    • 4 Sup...
Community Service Representatives                                 • First Aid / CPR certified• A walking “hotel concierge”
Daily combined roll-call
Substantial long-term trend: 1993-2011     • 45% drop in major crime in CCD     • 77.3% drop in theft-from-auto     •“Halo...
81% feel safe “most of the time” or “always”                        Perception of safety
1992: Public investment: arts & entertainment           Diversifying downtown land-use
Renovated historic theaters
Built new theaters
2002: Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts                          4,000 seats added
New home for Philadelphia Theater Company
Stimulated residential development
Center City today is rich with cultural amenities
2nd behind only New York CityNumber of Arts & Cultural organizations downtown
Both performing arts
& museums are seeing increased attendance
Continued to reinvest & expand
The Barnes Foundation
A new destination on the Parkway
Public investment: hospitalityPennsylvania Convention Center: 1993
Prompted private investment in new hotels:                   reused vacant buildings
Creating a new convention district
A 95% increase in hotel rooms
Nearly all within 15 minute walk
2001: New Independence Visitors Center
New home for Liberty Bell
#1 & #2 most visited destinations in the city
New Constitution CenterDiversifying the hospitality industry
New attractions have recently openedNational Museum of American Jewish History
President’s House
Steady growth in domestic travel
Overseas visitation rebounding from recession
We have added many new reasons for people                     to come to Center City
More customers = improving retail mix
42% of expenditures of hotel guests Spent outside hotel on shopping & diningGPTMC
Combined with growth of downtown population $491 million within 30 minute walk of City Hall
3 2 2 % g r o w t h in f in e d in in g                          re s ta ura nts                                        27...
Flourishing of sidewalk cafes
1995 = zero
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010:
273 cafes in 2011
People attract people
Growth of self-sustaining evening economy
Financing public area improvements            1994            • 20-year reauthorization            1995            • $21 m...
1996: Streetscape Improvements           • 893 trees; 72 planters
Visitor- friendly: 683 pedestrian maps & signs
Integrated with 233 signs for motorist          that the CCD also maintains
Making Transit More Customer Friendly
Route maps and historic images
New graphics for 108 entrances to underground
1        2,032 Pedestrian-scale lights          Doubled nighttime illumination.
Completed 2/3 of all streets in last decade
Supports the evening economy
Focused on small-scale incremental changes that add upC:  Document a Setings ev Deskt 17t Steetpl nt s 20 7.J         s nd...
Benjamin Franklin ParkwayComprehensive lighting program
222 new pedestrian & 132 vehicular lights
Interpretative signs
Illuminated 14 major public sculptures
Facades of 8 major civic buildings
Culminated in November 2004         Lighting of City Hall       From 7 adjacent buildings
2005 City Hall Holiday Lighting
D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 illu m in a t e d 9 b u ild in g                                            fa c a d e s
September 2008 opened our first commercial café            As part of a park renovation project
Speciality lighting to animate public spaces                     3 JFK underpasses
Renovated Chestnut Park
A quiet gathering place
But also a place to get a bite to eat
$68 millioncapital improvements
Residential revival1996: 4.5 million sf. Vacant Class “C” office space                                  • Retained archite...
10 year residential tax abatement                  Approved 1997           • Extraordinary costs of             converting...
1998–2011: 171 buildings of all sizes       Converted to residential use
Since 1997 added 13,000 new units of housing
10.2% increase in population since 2000                   26% in core of downtown                                 Since 19...
Center City attracting more younger people than rest of city                   41% of downtown: ages 25-44; city = 28%
Center City has more than twice the national            average of residents ages 25-34.
Close proximity that makes us#1 nationally: walk to work – 38%; 22% public transit
Diversification of CBD land-use25,000 residents now living inside CCD boundaries                25,000
Continuing rental remand33,578 students downtown; 84,876 adjacent
58% of seniors are “somewhat” to “very likely”                       to stay after graduation                            C...
Significant volumes of returning empty nesters          & they have driven up housing prices
Average residential sale price: 2.26 x citywide
Younger home-buyers are moving outward
Citywide 20% of residents work downtownIn core 40-50% downtown; 11.2% in University City
Extended neighborhoods rapidly approaching 40%
These outer areas greatest increase in bike & bus                             commuting to work.
Educational levels continue to riseBA Degree                     Graduate Degree
These are the well-educated workers that employers want      Residents start to play a role in attracting business
Big opportunity: 22,710 children were born toGreater Center City parents from 2000 to 2011
Parents groups now actively involved in plans                  To improve playgrounds
Coalition to improve downtown schools
Expanded schools website to serve these families                                      E
Reflected in our capital priorities: Sister Cities Park
Generous landscaping, new fountain,Children’s discovery garden, café, community                                      facil...
Sister Cities fountain
Philadelphia at the center of the universe
Names of Sister Cities
Height of water jet related to size of populati
Children’s discovery garden: ages 2-8
Recreation of the Wissahickon
Boat pond, discovery garden in background
Café overlooking the boat pond
Café building
Competitively selected operator
Revenues support operations of park
Branch of official Visitors Center
Extensive outdoor seating
Seating looks over the boat pond
Looks back on the office from which  You are playing hooky for the afternoon
Biggest sign of change
Contrast to 1970s
How did Philadelphia fare in the recession?
Housing production dropped dramatically      for condos & single family houses
Demand for rental remains strong
Rents continue to rise
Planned apartments are starting construction                Eds & meds as prime driver
Population continues to riseCore = Vine to Pine; Extended = Girard to Tasker
Average daily hotel room rates initially declined
Center recently doubled in size
Expansion complete; 2,000 room shortage             Room rates are rebounding
Average daily rate for Center City hotels
Leisure & hospitality job growth outperformed suburbs
Office occupancy rates declined
But in general, most CBD office districts have                   outperformed their suburbs.Philadelphia: #3 behind Wash D...
Philadelphia has a very high concentration                            in eds & meds
Philadelphia’s share is double national average                  of 18% in education & health
Much higher than east coast peers
Education & health care employment added jobs in                     all but 6 of the last 60 months   Philadelphia’s prim...
Jeff, Drexel, Penn & CHOP all expanding downtown
Education & health care job growth outperformed suburbs
Next on the agenda: Invest in regional infrastructure
#1: Expanding runway capacityPhiladelphia International Airport
Allow simultaneous take-off & landing
#2: Big opportunityCapitalize on national support for high-speed rail
Long-shot, game-changer: High speed rail38 minutes to NYC; 67 minutes to Washington DC
Stopping both in Center City & PHL Airport
Strategic infrastructure investments at city level                   Organized around job centers                  55% of ...
Largest center of employment in region     $12.1 billion salaries to metro residents
University City: rapidly expanding
Research & development clustered in 4 nodes              National Institute              of Health (NIH)              Rese...
These 2 employment nodes: 51% private sector jobs         Well-connected to region by public transit
Invest first to connect city’s two largestemployment & research nodes: 51% of jobs
Fill in the thinned out,          underperforming western edge21st Street        22nd Street              23rd Street     ...
Center City + University CityFront to 40th: one continuous business district           Area well-served by existing transit
(1) Enhance subway-surface & subway lines
With new transit signs + real time information
(2) Green & calm major streets in office district
Improve barren plazas
New green public amenities
Encourage more active ground-floor retail
Enhance landscaping & bicycle infrastructure
Page 6
Conceptual design complete:
(3) Improve visibility of local transit at 30th St Station
Improve the quality of public spaces
Improve the quality of public spaces
Small scale investments make a differenceEnhance connection between AMTRAK & SEPTA
(4) Create a new civic space at Dilworth plaza
New gateway to regional transit
New outdoor cafe
Visible from Convention Center; views up Parkway
New green amenities
Curved benches
Illuminated at night
Fountain on the northLa w n
A thin sheet of water you can walk on     FOUNTAIN
3 foot high programmed jets
(5) Finish MSE: Stimulate movement between major             destinations at either end of the street                     ...
Make Market Street: primary hospitality & destination retail/entertainment corridor
Transform the Gallery
Create a continuous exciting retail experience                               From 8th Street
Animate the sidewalks with retail
Gateway & connector to Chinatown & Convention Ctr
We have a highly successful, walkable downtown                         With a diversity of uses
Well-linked to the region with highway & rail
Thriving with day and nighttime activities
Re-infused with value in the post-petroleum age:       Dense, diverse & walkable = sustainable
Assessment trends 1991-2011: Diversification pays dividends
Thriving center of opportunity for the city & region                      www.centercityphila.org
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
Levy eda conference
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Levy eda conference

  1. 1. The transformation of Center City Philadelphia into a 24 hour downtown
  2. 2. Philadelphia: one of the original colonial cities
  3. 3. William Penn’s grid positioned atnarrowest point between two rivers
  4. 4. Founded 1682: Plan - Center Square + 4 public squares
  5. 5. Enduring urban form: Original city = Center City
  6. 6. Broad & Market Streets
  7. 7. Five public squares
  8. 8. Logan FranklinRittenhouse Washington
  9. 9. Legacy: human-scale, walkable city
  10. 10. While this made us obsolete: 1950s-1970s
  11. 11. Re-infused with value in the post-petroleum age: Dense, diverse & walkable = sustainable
  12. 12. Inherit an industrial past
  13. 13. Largest 19th century industrial city in North America With major industries: Stetson Hat Factory
  14. 14. Baldwin Locomotives
  15. 15. Large factories often developers of rowhouses
  16. 16. Gave life to our waterfront
  17. 17. Many small shops across all older neighborhoods; 1906: 16,000 manufacturing plants Unlike Pittsburgh & Detroit not a one-industry town Highly diversified
  18. 18. Accelerated immediately after World War II Factories were moving out the city
  19. 19. De-industrialization coincided with America’s attachment to cheap fuel & large cars
  20. 20. Federal policies that gave priority to the car
  21. 21. Resulted residential abandonment; population loss
  22. 22. Total Population: 1880-2008 Philadelphia & Its Suburbs Declining share of regional residents6,000,0005,000,0004,000,0003,000,000 Suburbs2,000,000 2.1 million1,000,000 City 0 10 20 30 80 90 00 40 50 60 08 70 80 90 00 18 18 19 20 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 20
  23. 23. Red blighted areas = old manufacturing areas
  24. 24. Sad, vacant ruins visible from Amtrak
  25. 25. P ie r s w e r e le f t t o d e t e r io r a t e
  26. 26. Inherit successful downtown revitalization program that has built a post-industrial city
  27. 27. 1956: 567 properties designated for preservation
  28. 28. Philadelphia has a long tradition of downtown living
  29. 29. 1950s: Creation of modern new Office District
  30. 30. 1953: the demolition of “Chinese wall”
  31. 31. Penn Center
  32. 32. 1960s & 1970s: all buildings connected to transit
  33. 33. 1980s: Linked Pennsylvania & Reading Railroad into integrated regional rail system
  34. 34. Employers: easy access to 360 degree labor market 295,000 riders/day take transit into downtown
  35. 35. 1980s office boom:
  36. 36. 1990: 38 million s.f. of office space
  37. 37. Similar process of renewal in University City
  38. 38. Temple University: educational & medical campuses
  39. 39. The emerging employment center at the Navy Yard
  40. 40. All the city’s major employment centers are result Of major strategic investments 55% of all private sector jobs In 5 post-industrial nodes
  41. 41. Philadelphia is a major center of office employment
  42. 42. A major center for research & health care
  43. 43. Global center for education
  44. 44. Maintained careful balance of small & large scale
  45. 45. Integrating old & new
  46. 46. 1990: A degraded public environment: Declining resources for cities
  47. 47. Substantial ground & upper floor vacancy
  48. 48. Neglected facades, solid security gates
  49. 49. 9 to 5 downtown; empty streets at night
  50. 50. Losing office market share to suburbs
  51. 51. Origin of the CCD: 1990 Recession • Fiscal crisis • Declining city services • Job loss • Office vacancy • “pride of avoidance”
  52. 52. Creating the Center City DistrictMunicipality Authorities Act of 1945 1990 • 2,100 property owners & local government approve a special services district 1991: $6.5 million Reauthorized 1994 (2015) Expanded 1995 (MSE) Reauthorized 2004 (2025) Reauthorized 2007 (2025) 2012: $19.5 million
  53. 53. CCD boundaries: 220 blocks, 5,118 properties
  54. 54. 1991: Focus on the basics – comprehensive cleaning
  55. 55. 65% of survey respondentsSay Center City “much cleaner” than rest of the city
  56. 56. Community Service Representatives Deployment • 42 CSR’s • 4 Supervisors • 7 days per week
  57. 57. Community Service Representatives • First Aid / CPR certified• A walking “hotel concierge”
  58. 58. Daily combined roll-call
  59. 59. Substantial long-term trend: 1993-2011 • 45% drop in major crime in CCD • 77.3% drop in theft-from-auto •“Halo” effect outside CCD boundaries
  60. 60. 81% feel safe “most of the time” or “always” Perception of safety
  61. 61. 1992: Public investment: arts & entertainment Diversifying downtown land-use
  62. 62. Renovated historic theaters
  63. 63. Built new theaters
  64. 64. 2002: Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts 4,000 seats added
  65. 65. New home for Philadelphia Theater Company
  66. 66. Stimulated residential development
  67. 67. Center City today is rich with cultural amenities
  68. 68. 2nd behind only New York CityNumber of Arts & Cultural organizations downtown
  69. 69. Both performing arts
  70. 70. & museums are seeing increased attendance
  71. 71. Continued to reinvest & expand
  72. 72. The Barnes Foundation
  73. 73. A new destination on the Parkway
  74. 74. Public investment: hospitalityPennsylvania Convention Center: 1993
  75. 75. Prompted private investment in new hotels: reused vacant buildings
  76. 76. Creating a new convention district
  77. 77. A 95% increase in hotel rooms
  78. 78. Nearly all within 15 minute walk
  79. 79. 2001: New Independence Visitors Center
  80. 80. New home for Liberty Bell
  81. 81. #1 & #2 most visited destinations in the city
  82. 82. New Constitution CenterDiversifying the hospitality industry
  83. 83. New attractions have recently openedNational Museum of American Jewish History
  84. 84. President’s House
  85. 85. Steady growth in domestic travel
  86. 86. Overseas visitation rebounding from recession
  87. 87. We have added many new reasons for people to come to Center City
  88. 88. More customers = improving retail mix
  89. 89. 42% of expenditures of hotel guests Spent outside hotel on shopping & diningGPTMC
  90. 90. Combined with growth of downtown population $491 million within 30 minute walk of City Hall
  91. 91. 3 2 2 % g r o w t h in f in e d in in g re s ta ura nts 27465 in 1992
  92. 92. Flourishing of sidewalk cafes
  93. 93. 1995 = zero
  94. 94. 2002
  95. 95. 2003
  96. 96. 2004
  97. 97. 2005
  98. 98. 2006
  99. 99. 2007
  100. 100. 2008
  101. 101. 2009
  102. 102. 2010:
  103. 103. 273 cafes in 2011
  104. 104. People attract people
  105. 105. Growth of self-sustaining evening economy
  106. 106. Financing public area improvements 1994 • 20-year reauthorization 1995 • $21 million tax-exempt bond issue backed only by CCD revenues • +$5 million City funding
  107. 107. 1996: Streetscape Improvements • 893 trees; 72 planters
  108. 108. Visitor- friendly: 683 pedestrian maps & signs
  109. 109. Integrated with 233 signs for motorist that the CCD also maintains
  110. 110. Making Transit More Customer Friendly
  111. 111. Route maps and historic images
  112. 112. New graphics for 108 entrances to underground
  113. 113. 1 2,032 Pedestrian-scale lights Doubled nighttime illumination.
  114. 114. Completed 2/3 of all streets in last decade
  115. 115. Supports the evening economy
  116. 116. Focused on small-scale incremental changes that add upC: Document a Setings ev Deskt 17t Steetpl nt s 20 7.J s nd t pl y op h r a er 0 PG
  117. 117. Benjamin Franklin ParkwayComprehensive lighting program
  118. 118. 222 new pedestrian & 132 vehicular lights
  119. 119. Interpretative signs
  120. 120. Illuminated 14 major public sculptures
  121. 121. Facades of 8 major civic buildings
  122. 122. Culminated in November 2004 Lighting of City Hall From 7 adjacent buildings
  123. 123. 2005 City Hall Holiday Lighting
  124. 124. D e c e m b e r 2 0 0 8 illu m in a t e d 9 b u ild in g fa c a d e s
  125. 125. September 2008 opened our first commercial café As part of a park renovation project
  126. 126. Speciality lighting to animate public spaces 3 JFK underpasses
  127. 127. Renovated Chestnut Park
  128. 128. A quiet gathering place
  129. 129. But also a place to get a bite to eat
  130. 130. $68 millioncapital improvements
  131. 131. Residential revival1996: 4.5 million sf. Vacant Class “C” office space • Retained architect & developer to evaluate buildings • Survey to determine best buildings; floor layout, window size & exposure • Detailed economic analysis of 10 buildings: evaluation for code compliance, cost- estimate, pro-formas.
  132. 132. 10 year residential tax abatement Approved 1997 • Extraordinary costs of converting from vacant office or industrial to residential use • 10 year abatement on improvements • Available city wide
  133. 133. 1998–2011: 171 buildings of all sizes Converted to residential use
  134. 134. Since 1997 added 13,000 new units of housing
  135. 135. 10.2% increase in population since 2000 26% in core of downtown Since 1990 8 Zip codes = 7.8 sq miles 5.7% of city’s land area hold 12% = 181,003 Fastest growing Most densely settled
  136. 136. Center City attracting more younger people than rest of city 41% of downtown: ages 25-44; city = 28%
  137. 137. Center City has more than twice the national average of residents ages 25-34.
  138. 138. Close proximity that makes us#1 nationally: walk to work – 38%; 22% public transit
  139. 139. Diversification of CBD land-use25,000 residents now living inside CCD boundaries 25,000
  140. 140. Continuing rental remand33,578 students downtown; 84,876 adjacent
  141. 141. 58% of seniors are “somewhat” to “very likely” to stay after graduation Campus Philly survey
  142. 142. Significant volumes of returning empty nesters & they have driven up housing prices
  143. 143. Average residential sale price: 2.26 x citywide
  144. 144. Younger home-buyers are moving outward
  145. 145. Citywide 20% of residents work downtownIn core 40-50% downtown; 11.2% in University City
  146. 146. Extended neighborhoods rapidly approaching 40%
  147. 147. These outer areas greatest increase in bike & bus commuting to work.
  148. 148. Educational levels continue to riseBA Degree Graduate Degree
  149. 149. These are the well-educated workers that employers want Residents start to play a role in attracting business
  150. 150. Big opportunity: 22,710 children were born toGreater Center City parents from 2000 to 2011
  151. 151. Parents groups now actively involved in plans To improve playgrounds
  152. 152. Coalition to improve downtown schools
  153. 153. Expanded schools website to serve these families E
  154. 154. Reflected in our capital priorities: Sister Cities Park
  155. 155. Generous landscaping, new fountain,Children’s discovery garden, café, community facility
  156. 156. Sister Cities fountain
  157. 157. Philadelphia at the center of the universe
  158. 158. Names of Sister Cities
  159. 159. Height of water jet related to size of populati
  160. 160. Children’s discovery garden: ages 2-8
  161. 161. Recreation of the Wissahickon
  162. 162. Boat pond, discovery garden in background
  163. 163. Café overlooking the boat pond
  164. 164. Café building
  165. 165. Competitively selected operator
  166. 166. Revenues support operations of park
  167. 167. Branch of official Visitors Center
  168. 168. Extensive outdoor seating
  169. 169. Seating looks over the boat pond
  170. 170. Looks back on the office from which You are playing hooky for the afternoon
  171. 171. Biggest sign of change
  172. 172. Contrast to 1970s
  173. 173. How did Philadelphia fare in the recession?
  174. 174. Housing production dropped dramatically for condos & single family houses
  175. 175. Demand for rental remains strong
  176. 176. Rents continue to rise
  177. 177. Planned apartments are starting construction Eds & meds as prime driver
  178. 178. Population continues to riseCore = Vine to Pine; Extended = Girard to Tasker
  179. 179. Average daily hotel room rates initially declined
  180. 180. Center recently doubled in size
  181. 181. Expansion complete; 2,000 room shortage Room rates are rebounding
  182. 182. Average daily rate for Center City hotels
  183. 183. Leisure & hospitality job growth outperformed suburbs
  184. 184. Office occupancy rates declined
  185. 185. But in general, most CBD office districts have outperformed their suburbs.Philadelphia: #3 behind Wash DC & NYC holding occupancy levels
  186. 186. Philadelphia has a very high concentration in eds & meds
  187. 187. Philadelphia’s share is double national average of 18% in education & health
  188. 188. Much higher than east coast peers
  189. 189. Education & health care employment added jobs in all but 6 of the last 60 months Philadelphia’s primary buffer against recession
  190. 190. Jeff, Drexel, Penn & CHOP all expanding downtown
  191. 191. Education & health care job growth outperformed suburbs
  192. 192. Next on the agenda: Invest in regional infrastructure
  193. 193. #1: Expanding runway capacityPhiladelphia International Airport
  194. 194. Allow simultaneous take-off & landing
  195. 195. #2: Big opportunityCapitalize on national support for high-speed rail
  196. 196. Long-shot, game-changer: High speed rail38 minutes to NYC; 67 minutes to Washington DC
  197. 197. Stopping both in Center City & PHL Airport
  198. 198. Strategic infrastructure investments at city level Organized around job centers 55% of Philadelphia’s jobs are in just 5 clusters of post-industrial employment
  199. 199. Largest center of employment in region $12.1 billion salaries to metro residents
  200. 200. University City: rapidly expanding
  201. 201. Research & development clustered in 4 nodes National Institute of Health (NIH) Research Funds: 2007
  202. 202. These 2 employment nodes: 51% private sector jobs Well-connected to region by public transit
  203. 203. Invest first to connect city’s two largestemployment & research nodes: 51% of jobs
  204. 204. Fill in the thinned out, underperforming western edge21st Street 22nd Street 23rd Street Market Street
  205. 205. Center City + University CityFront to 40th: one continuous business district Area well-served by existing transit
  206. 206. (1) Enhance subway-surface & subway lines
  207. 207. With new transit signs + real time information
  208. 208. (2) Green & calm major streets in office district
  209. 209. Improve barren plazas
  210. 210. New green public amenities
  211. 211. Encourage more active ground-floor retail
  212. 212. Enhance landscaping & bicycle infrastructure
  213. 213. Page 6
  214. 214. Conceptual design complete:
  215. 215. (3) Improve visibility of local transit at 30th St Station
  216. 216. Improve the quality of public spaces
  217. 217. Improve the quality of public spaces
  218. 218. Small scale investments make a differenceEnhance connection between AMTRAK & SEPTA
  219. 219. (4) Create a new civic space at Dilworth plaza
  220. 220. New gateway to regional transit
  221. 221. New outdoor cafe
  222. 222. Visible from Convention Center; views up Parkway
  223. 223. New green amenities
  224. 224. Curved benches
  225. 225. Illuminated at night
  226. 226. Fountain on the northLa w n
  227. 227. A thin sheet of water you can walk on FOUNTAIN
  228. 228. 3 foot high programmed jets
  229. 229. (5) Finish MSE: Stimulate movement between major destinations at either end of the street Conven tion Center City Hall Market S tr eet East Independence Mall8 City Blocks 3500 Feet 2/3 of a Mile
  230. 230. Make Market Street: primary hospitality & destination retail/entertainment corridor
  231. 231. Transform the Gallery
  232. 232. Create a continuous exciting retail experience From 8th Street
  233. 233. Animate the sidewalks with retail
  234. 234. Gateway & connector to Chinatown & Convention Ctr
  235. 235. We have a highly successful, walkable downtown With a diversity of uses
  236. 236. Well-linked to the region with highway & rail
  237. 237. Thriving with day and nighttime activities
  238. 238. Re-infused with value in the post-petroleum age: Dense, diverse & walkable = sustainable
  239. 239. Assessment trends 1991-2011: Diversification pays dividends
  240. 240. Thriving center of opportunity for the city & region www.centercityphila.org
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