• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Testing new toy economies/political structures in MMOGs
 

Testing new toy economies/political structures in MMOGs

on

  • 704 views

Talk given at the open knowledge conference on July 1st 2011 in Berlin

Talk given at the open knowledge conference on July 1st 2011 in Berlin

Statistics

Views

Total Views
704
Views on SlideShare
702
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.randform.org 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Testing new toy economies/political structures in MMOGs Testing new toy economies/political structures in MMOGs Presentation Transcript

    • Testing new toy economies/political structures in MMOGs Nadja Kutz Berlin June/July 2011
    • Concept Some abbreviations: a MMOG is a Massive Multiplayer Online Game i.e. it is a computer game, which is played online with Massively many players. The game is usually using multiple servers.
    • Concept Some abbreviations: a MMOG is a Massive Multiplayer Online Game i.e. it is a computer game, which is played online with Massively many players. The game is usually using multiple servers. Examples:
    • Concept Some abbreviations: a MMOG is a Massive Multiplayer Online Game i.e. it is a computer game, which is played online with Massively many players. The game is usually using multiple servers. Examples: World of Warcraft (1994,2004) (11 to 12 million monthly subscribers worldwide) (MMPORG)
    • Concept Some abbreviations: a MMOG is a Massive Multiplayer Online Game i.e. it is a computer game, which is played online with Massively many players. The game is usually using multiple servers. Examples: World of Warcraft (1994,2004) (11 to 12 million monthly subscribers worldwide) (MMPORG) Happy Farm (228 million active users, and 23 million daily users)(MMORTS)
    • A MMOG is developped using a software which may be calledgame engine or game environment.
    • A MMOG is developped using a software which may be calledgame engine or game environment.Open source MMOG game engines are worldforge and ArianneA screenshot from the Worldforge client Ember showing a goblinraid on a castle. (Photo: Erik Hjortsberg)
    • A lot of MMOGs have a socalled virtual economy that is aneconomy which lives in the virtual world of the correspondinggame. Such an economy has often even its own currency like inthe example of the World of Warcraft the currency WoW gold.
    • A lot of MMOGs have a socalled virtual economy that is aneconomy which lives in the virtual world of the correspondinggame. Such an economy has often even its own currency like inthe example of the World of Warcraft the currency WoW gold.The virtual economy of agame reaches sometimes intothe real world, like e.g. via ablack market.
    • MMOGs are increasingly subject of scientific research, also ineconomics.
    • MMOGs are increasingly subject of scientific research, also ineconomics.For example: Macroeconomic behaviour in Everquest wasinvestigated in the research project As real as real? by EdwardCastronova, Dmitri Williams, Cuihua Shen, Ratan Rabindra, XiongLi, Yun Huang, and Brian Keegan:Transaction data from a large commercial virtual world, the firstsuch data set provided to outside researchers, is used to calculatemetrics for production, consumption and money supply based onreal-world definitions. Movements in these metrics over time wereexamined for consistency with common theories of macroeconomicchange. The results indicated that virtual economic behaviorfollows real-world patterns. (new media and society, 2009)
    • Looking at MMOGs a question arised, which finally let to this talk:
    • Looking at MMOGs a question arised, which finally let to this talk: Why not try to find a whole new political/ macroeconomic system with the aide of MMOGs?
    • Motivation Why should one?... try to find a new macroeconomic system with a MMOG?!
    • There are two things to discuss:
    • There are two things to discuss:1. Why a new macroeconomic system?
    • There are two things to discuss:1. Why a new macroeconomic system?2. Why simulate on a MMOG ?
    • 1. Why a new macroeconomic system?
    • 1. Why a new macroeconomic system?For some asking this question appears already superfluous, forothers not.
    • 1. Why a new macroeconomic system?For some asking this question appears already superfluous, forothers not.It is certainly not possible to discuss this thouroughly in thistalk, so just some key thoughts on this, which shall display therelevance of scientific data with regard to this question.
    • Problem: planet earth is limited.
    • So just recycle!
    • So just recycle!Problems:
    • So just recycle!Problems:1. Recycling (likewise reduction and reuse) takesusually only place if its profitable (like if resourcesare scarce (in particular if there are no otheroptions) and/or if political regulations areinvigorated)
    • So just recycle!Problems:1. Recycling (likewise reduction and reuse) takesusually only place if its profitable (like if resourcesare scarce (in particular if there are no otheroptions) and/or if political regulations areinvigorated)2. Recycling needs energy
    • Famous example where recycling is less taking place:
    • Famous example where recycling is less taking place:recycling of greenhouse gases (as waste byproducts from energyproduction)
    • Famous example where recycling is less taking place:recycling of greenhouse gases (as waste byproducts from energyproduction)wasteproblem is here leading to rapid climate change which hasrather dramatic consequences
    • The recycling of e.g. the green house gas CO2(carbon dioxid) would mean to either use CO2 inother processes (like for algae) or to separate itagain into carbon and oxygen, which would mean toput back the energy one had once won from burningfossils
    • The recycling of e.g. the green house gas CO2(carbon dioxid) would mean to either use CO2 inother processes (like for algae) or to separate itagain into carbon and oxygen, which would mean toput back the energy one had once won from burningfossilsSo one has eventually to take a “recycling-run-away effect” intoaccount, i.e. additional energy needs which are due to recyclingand in particular which are due to recycling of waste products fromenergy production
    • Problem:
    • Problem:Due to the upcoming scarcity of Uranium 235 future nucleartechnology will mostly use BREEDERS, which breed Uranium 233(from Thorium) or Plutonium (from Uranium 238).
    • Problem:Due to the upcoming scarcity of Uranium 235 future nucleartechnology will mostly use BREEDERS, which breed Uranium 233(from Thorium) or Plutonium (from Uranium 238).Why may this be a problem?
    • Problem:Due to the upcoming scarcity of Uranium 235 future nucleartechnology will mostly use BREEDERS, which breed Uranium 233(from Thorium) or Plutonium (from Uranium 238).Why may this be a problem? - Rather newtechnology withpotentially big wasteproblem Image: Prolineserver
    • Example: a popular breeder type are Fast reactors. (e.g. favoriteUS future reactor design)
    • Example: a popular breeder type are Fast reactors. (e.g. favoriteUS future reactor design)Experiences with nuclear power according to world-nuclear.org (apro-nuclear organization):
    • Example: a popular breeder type are Fast reactors. (e.g. favoriteUS future reactor design)Experiences with nuclear power according to world-nuclear.org (apro-nuclear organization):14170 reactor years of civil nuclear power and
    • Example: a popular breeder type are Fast reactors. (e.g. favoriteUS future reactor design)Experiences with nuclear power according to world-nuclear.org (apro-nuclear organization):14170 reactor years of civil nuclear power and390 reactor-years experiencewith fast reactors (image tothe right: One of the 6 fastreactors currently operating inthe world at Monju, Japan. TheMonju reactor was closed in1995 due to a major fire causedby a sodium leak. Since thereopening in May 2010 it hadapparently operated for only one Image: Nifehour due to other accidents)
    • Moreover nuclear technologies which reduce waste are rather inresearch state and/or are too expensive. An example fromworld-nuclear.org:
    • Moreover nuclear technologies which reduce waste are rather inresearch state and/or are too expensive. An example fromworld-nuclear.org: “Much development work is still required before thethorium fuel cycle can be commercialised, and the effort requiredseems unlikely while (or where) abundant uranium is available.”
    • Moreover nuclear technologies which reduce waste are rather inresearch state and/or are too expensive. An example fromworld-nuclear.org: “Much development work is still required before thethorium fuel cycle can be commercialised, and the effort requiredseems unlikely while (or where) abundant uranium is available.”Likewise reprocessing is currently usually more costly than dumpingand breeding is economically attractive. Amongst others this maycreate a
    • Moreover nuclear technologies which reduce waste are rather inresearch state and/or are too expensive. An example fromworld-nuclear.org: “Much development work is still required before thethorium fuel cycle can be commercialised, and the effort requiredseems unlikely while (or where) abundant uranium is available.”Likewise reprocessing is currently usually more costly than dumpingand breeding is economically attractive. Amongst others this maycreate abig plutonium market
    • Image: Digital Globe
    • Image: USAF
    • Quick calculation:
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )area of deserts: 36 · 1012 m2 , number of hours in a year: 8760h
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )area of deserts: 36 · 1012 m2 , number of hours in a year: 8760hIn a year this gives an energy of: 36·1012 260W 8760hsizeofdeserts · sunpower · hours · 82·106 ·1012 Wh = 82 million TWh
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )area of deserts: 36 · 1012 m2 , number of hours in a year: 8760hIn a year this gives an energy of: 36·1012 260W 8760hsizeofdeserts · sunpower · hours · 82·106 ·1012 Wh = 82 million TWh Fossil and nuclear energy consumption in 2005:107 · 103 TWh 750 · 82TWh
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )area of deserts: 36 · 1012 m2 , number of hours in a year: 8760hIn a year this gives an energy of: 36·1012 260W 8760hsizeofdeserts · sunpower · hours · 82·106 ·1012 Wh = 82 million TWh Fossil and nuclear energy consumption in 2005:107 · 103 TWh 750 · 82TWhThe energy arriving in a year in the worlds desert is approx.750 times more than the fossil and nuclear energy needed in2005.
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )area of deserts: 36 · 1012 m2 , number of hours in a year: 8760hIn a year this gives an energy of: 36·1012 260W 8760hsizeofdeserts · sunpower · hours · 82·106 ·1012 Wh = 82 million TWh Fossil and nuclear energy consumption in 2005:107 · 103 TWh 750 · 82TWhThe energy arriving in a year in the worlds desert is approx.750 times more than the fossil and nuclear energy needed in2005.Assume conversion efficiency from solar energy to electricity of10% then
    • Quick calculation:Average power received per square metre in deserts is according tothe Desertec White Book 260W /m2 (northern european areassolar power per area is only about 100W /m2 )area of deserts: 36 · 1012 m2 , number of hours in a year: 8760hIn a year this gives an energy of: 36·1012 260W 8760hsizeofdeserts · sunpower · hours · 82·106 ·1012 Wh = 82 million TWh Fossil and nuclear energy consumption in 2005:107 · 103 TWh 750 · 82TWhThe energy arriving in a year in the worlds desert is approx.750 times more than the fossil and nuclear energy needed in2005.Assume conversion efficiency from solar energy to electricity of10% thenSolar in deserts could give 75 times more energythan fossil and nuclear in 2005
    • 75 times more energy fromsolar than we need??!
    • 75 times more energy fromsolar than we need??!Great !!!!!!!!
    • 75 times more energy fromsolar than we need??!Great !!!!!!!!all problemssolved !!!!!!
    • 75 times more energy fromsolar than we need??!Great !!!!!!!!all problemssolved !!!!!!Let’s have a pizza!!
    • Unfortunately....
    • Unfortunately....there may be again problems...
    • Unfortunately....there may be again problems...Major problem: installment is a huge venture, i.e. the technologicalproblems may eventually be solvable but solar power may be moreexpensive than fossil and nuclear in economic competitioni.e. it seems there may again be rather severeeconomic/political obstacles
    • what about the future?
    • what about the future? what about population growth?
    • 2010 Revision of the World Population Prospects, United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDEP):Medium fertility variant:The world population is to reach 10 billion by 2100 if fertility inall countries converges to replacement level (1 babygirl perwoman) After 2100 it would decline with this fertility.
    • 2010 Revision of the World Population Prospects, United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDEP):Medium fertility variant:The world population is to reach 10 billion by 2100 if fertility inall countries converges to replacement level (1 babygirl perwoman) After 2100 it would decline with this fertility.Low fertility variant:fertility of 0.5 babygirls per woman: 8.1 billion in 2050 and declinetowards the second half of this century to reach 6.2 billion in 2100.
    • 2010 Revision of the World Population Prospects, United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDEP):Medium fertility variant:The world population is to reach 10 billion by 2100 if fertility inall countries converges to replacement level (1 babygirl perwoman) After 2100 it would decline with this fertility.Low fertility variant:fertility of 0.5 babygirls per woman: 8.1 billion in 2050 and declinetowards the second half of this century to reach 6.2 billion in 2100.High fertility variant:fertility of 1.5 babygirls per woman: 10.6 billion in 2050 and 15.8billion in 2100
    • 2010 Revision of the World Population Prospects, United NationsDepartment of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDEP):Medium fertility variant:The world population is to reach 10 billion by 2100 if fertility inall countries converges to replacement level (1 babygirl perwoman) After 2100 it would decline with this fertility.Low fertility variant:fertility of 0.5 babygirls per woman: 8.1 billion in 2050 and declinetowards the second half of this century to reach 6.2 billion in 2100.High fertility variant:fertility of 1.5 babygirls per woman: 10.6 billion in 2050 and 15.8billion in 2100Probably strong growth in less developped regions like in parts ofAfrica:Africas population was in 2011 equivalent to 61 per cent of thepopulation of the Americas, Europe and Oceania. In 2100, Africa couldbe five times as populous as Northern America and over 4 times morepopulous than either Europe or Latin America and the Caribbean
    • What does this mean forenergy consumption?
    • energy consumption population GDP per capita energy intensity GDPworld EC EC = N ∗ N ∗ GDPworld
    • energy consumption population GDP per capita energy intensity GDPworld EC EC = N ∗ N ∗ GDPworldGDPworld : Gross Domestic Product (“Income”) of the world in ayearGDPworld /N: Gross Domestic Product of the world in a year percapitaeconomic growth (per capita): change of GDP (per capita) intime (a growth of 1.4 % of GDP per capita means that GDP percapita roughly doubles in about 50 years)EC: world energy consumption averaged over a yearenergy intensity: usually slightly decreases, for simplicity see it asa constant for the moment population GDP intensity ˙ E2001 = 6.145 ∗ 109 ∗ 7470$ ∗ 0.29W /$ = 13.31 ∗ 1012 W = 13.31 TW 13.5 TW
    • Using this formula one gets with the medium population variantand an average world economic growth (per capita) of 1.4 % (anda decreasing energy intensity!) roughly that:
    • Using this formula one gets with the medium population variantand an average world economic growth (per capita) of 1.4 % (anda decreasing energy intensity!) roughly that:Energy consumption will double by 2050 and bethree times more in 2100 than now
    • Using this formula one gets with the medium population variantand an average world economic growth (per capita) of 1.4 % (anda decreasing energy intensity!) roughly that:Energy consumption will double by 2050 and bethree times more in 2100 than nowWith a constant energy intensity (eventually due torecycling run away effect, higher energy needs forresource retrieval) it would roughly be six timesmore by 2100, and with the high fertility variantenergy consumption would get an additional factorof roughly 1.5 i.e. energy consumption would in thiscase be 9 times more in 2100 than now.
    • Using this formula one gets with the medium population variantand an average world economic growth (per capita) of 1.4 % (anda decreasing energy intensity!) roughly that:Energy consumption will double by 2050 and bethree times more in 2100 than nowWith a constant energy intensity (eventually due torecycling run away effect, higher energy needs forresource retrieval) it would roughly be six timesmore by 2100, and with the high fertility variantenergy consumption would get an additional factorof roughly 1.5 i.e. energy consumption would in thiscase be 9 times more in 2100 than now.
    • Using this formula one gets with the medium population variantand an average world economic growth (per capita) of 1.4 % (anda decreasing energy intensity!) roughly that:Energy consumption will double by 2050 and bethree times more in 2100 than nowWith a constant energy intensity (eventually due torecycling run away effect, higher energy needs forresource retrieval) it would roughly be six timesmore by 2100, and with the high fertility variantenergy consumption would get an additional factorof roughly 1.5 i.e. energy consumption would in thiscase be 9 times more in 2100 than now.Note that this is within the lifetime of people who are born now.
    • Conclusion: If the currentworld political/economicalsystem is not changed soonthen there may probably begreat problems soon.
    • Conclusion: If the currentworld political/economicalsystem is not changed soonthen there may probably begreat problems soon.left out in argumentation: the ailing world financial system, socialproblems...
    • OK. seems something has to be changed but....
    • OK. seems something has to be changed but....2. Why simulate with aMMOG ?
    • As pointed out earlier - the economy in MMOGs (like in everquest)is complicated enough to simulate real macroeconomic behaviour.
    • As pointed out earlier - the economy in MMOGs (like in everquest)is complicated enough to simulate real macroeconomic behaviour.
    • As pointed out earlier - the economy in MMOGs (like in everquest)is complicated enough to simulate real macroeconomic behaviour.The digital set-up of a MMOG allows to use and analysegame-play and settings in a scientific way.
    • As pointed out earlier - the economy in MMOGs (like in everquest)is complicated enough to simulate real macroeconomic behaviour.The digital set-up of a MMOG allows to use and analysegame-play and settings in a scientific way.Day-to-day world politics had sofar no big success in changing thefundamental problems. Fundamental changes are usually avoideddue to the unpredictability of the consequences of such changes.
    • As pointed out earlier - the economy in MMOGs (like in everquest)is complicated enough to simulate real macroeconomic behaviour.The digital set-up of a MMOG allows to use and analysegame-play and settings in a scientific way.Day-to-day world politics had sofar no big success in changing thefundamental problems. Fundamental changes are usually avoideddue to the unpredictability of the consequences of such changes.Using a MMOG in order totest new political/economicsystems is less invasive than arevolution. Sans culotte, by Aurevilly
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications:
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications: Since one has to scientifically evaluate, analyse and process the game and e.g. include scientific data, discuss findings etc. the MMOG game environment needs to be connected to scientific workplaces.
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications: Since one has to scientifically evaluate, analyse and process the game and e.g. include scientific data, discuss findings etc. the MMOG game environment needs to be connected to scientific workplaces. Some aspects connected with that:
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications: Since one has to scientifically evaluate, analyse and process the game and e.g. include scientific data, discuss findings etc. the MMOG game environment needs to be connected to scientific workplaces. Some aspects connected with that: → the specification of data (what type, what is the data about etc.) within the game has to be rather high (semantic web)
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications: Since one has to scientifically evaluate, analyse and process the game and e.g. include scientific data, discuss findings etc. the MMOG game environment needs to be connected to scientific workplaces. Some aspects connected with that: → the specification of data (what type, what is the data about etc.) within the game has to be rather high (semantic web) → the serialization (the way data is ordered) has to be easy manageable
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications: Since one has to scientifically evaluate, analyse and process the game and e.g. include scientific data, discuss findings etc. the MMOG game environment needs to be connected to scientific workplaces. Some aspects connected with that: → the specification of data (what type, what is the data about etc.) within the game has to be rather high (semantic web) → the serialization (the way data is ordered) has to be easy manageable → the data in games within the environment needs to be easily usable via well defined interfaces
    • About realization of concept Sketch of technical specifications: Since one has to scientifically evaluate, analyse and process the game and e.g. include scientific data, discuss findings etc. the MMOG game environment needs to be connected to scientific workplaces. Some aspects connected with that: → the specification of data (what type, what is the data about etc.) within the game has to be rather high (semantic web) → the serialization (the way data is ordered) has to be easy manageable → the data in games within the environment needs to be easily usable via well defined interfaces → one needs a supportive environment for scientific exchange/collaboration
    • The following realization pathway appears to make sense:
    • The following realization pathway appears to make sense:→ Improve accessibility, interoperability and manageability ofscientific data (already some progress: LOD (linked open dataweb), WDS (World Data System), Wikipedia etc.
    • The following realization pathway appears to make sense:→ Improve accessibility, interoperability and manageability ofscientific data (already some progress: LOD (linked open dataweb), WDS (World Data System), Wikipedia etc.→ Improve online communication/collaboration/data manipulationtools, find a global standard for scientists, which makesinformation interchange easier (“a global open scientific network”)
    • The following realization pathway appears to make sense:→ Improve accessibility, interoperability and manageability ofscientific data (already some progress: LOD (linked open dataweb), WDS (World Data System), Wikipedia etc.→ Improve online communication/collaboration/data manipulationtools, find a global standard for scientists, which makesinformation interchange easier (“a global open scientific network”)→ Seems suggestive: Set up a platform for scientists, whichrepresents/provides an access (linking) to such a global scientificnetwork as well as to global scientific data and which provides datamanagement tools. Such a platform may also eventually provideservices to the public. (like an online science parliament whichhands out scientifically motivated advices on complicated issues ,see “On the need for a global academic internet platform”http://arxiv.org/pdf/0803.1360v1)
    • → Such a platform/network could serve as a hub for the MMOGenvironment (similar to how some online games are taking place infacebook and other networks)
    • → Such a platform/network could serve as a hub for the MMOGenvironment (similar to how some online games are taking place infacebook and other networks)→ The hub should however be not just an access point to a game,but could indicate the scientific extra information, like the for thegame used data, display results from monitoring tools(Game-Cockpit) etc.
    • Some further comments on realization:→ development of a commercial MMOG game alone (i.e. not theenvironment) can cost 10 million $
    • Some further comments on realization:→ development of a commercial MMOG game alone (i.e. not theenvironment) can cost 10 million $→ the development of a professional commercial computer gamealone (not necessarily a MMOG) can easily take 5 years
    • Some further comments on realization:→ development of a commercial MMOG game alone (i.e. not theenvironment) can cost 10 million $→ the development of a professional commercial computer gamealone (not necessarily a MMOG) can easily take 5 years→ the experience of professional game developpers and platformdeveloppers is needed for such a project, however if some people atthe respective companies are not voluntarily philantropic then thismay get rather expensive
    • Some comments on the approach to the set-up of the gameenvironment:
    • Some comments on the approach to the set-up of the gameenvironment:It should be capable of hosting a MMOG with similarcapabilities to a standard MMOG.
    • Some comments on the approach to the set-up of the gameenvironment:It should be capable of hosting a MMOG with similarcapabilities to a standard MMOG.Additional information/technological needs for such anenvironment can be best assessed if one has already somegame proposals at hand.
    • Some comments on the approach to the set-up of the gameenvironment:It should be capable of hosting a MMOG with similarcapabilities to a standard MMOG.Additional information/technological needs for such anenvironment can be best assessed if one has already somegame proposals at hand.Thus development of a game prototype for a game with theworking title “Utopia” started in 2009.
    • Most contents of this talk, a short outline for the gameenvironment and a wiki for other game ideas is on an open projectat azimuthproject.org and in an article draft athttp://www.randform.org/blog/?p=3827. The azimuthprojectis an online collaboration of scientists, which gathers, analyses anddiscusses scientific information about global problems.
    • Short outline of some key concepts of the game Utopia
    • Short outline of some key concepts of the game UtopiaUtopia has several stages of gameplay there are sofar:
    • Short outline of some key concepts of the game UtopiaUtopia has several stages of gameplay there are sofar:1. stage: Determining local needs to come up with a set-up forsurvival
    • Short outline of some key concepts of the game UtopiaUtopia has several stages of gameplay there are sofar:1. stage: Determining local needs to come up with a set-up forsurvival2. stage: Luxury corrections to set-up
    • Short outline of some key concepts of the game UtopiaUtopia has several stages of gameplay there are sofar:1. stage: Determining local needs to come up with a set-up forsurvival2. stage: Luxury corrections to set-up3. stage (optional): Transition from real set-up to new set-up
    • Short outline of some key concepts of the game UtopiaUtopia has several stages of gameplay there are sofar:1. stage: Determining local needs to come up with a set-up forsurvival2. stage: Luxury corrections to set-up3. stage (optional): Transition from real set-up to new set-up4. stage: Real time strategy game play based on differenteconomic rules
    • First stage: Determining local needs for survival
    • First stage: Determining local needs for survivalUsing scientific cartography containing the most current (world)set-up of population, living space, production data etc. the current“real” set-up shall be changed to a new set-up which ensures avery basic set of living needs, like enough nutrition, living space,education, etc. The new set-up is subject to the constraint thatsome notion of “exchange” should approximately be minimized.Exchange can be here: exchange of goods, energy, commuting toworkplace (“exchange of humans”) etc. Exchange should beweighted by aspects like environmental friendliness, usefulness etc.In such a new set-up food should rather come from local farms etc.If scientific data is missing one could eventually think aboutassessing data via games (“guess how many number of people areliving in the appartments of the street you are just walkingthrough”.)
    • Second stage: Luxury corrections
    • Second stage: Luxury correctionsIt is to be expected that a given real set-up will be quite differentto a set-up which was determined in the first stage. One can fix anamount of the excessive infrastructure/goods of the real set-up for“luxury distribution”. In the 2. stage this “extra”infrastructure/goods which is not needed for immediate survivallike extra living space, higher education, musical instruments,dish-washers, extra transport (travel), TV etc. can be distributed,with an regard to environmental friendliness. The “luxurydistribution” may be locally different (has to be negotiated) andcould even encompass “unjust” distribution, like that some localpeople/organisations may obtain more luxury. This could be e.g.determined in polls. Here influences to birthrates could beimplemented (e.g. soft ones like reduction of TV and alcoholconsume for families with many childs).
    • Third stage (optional): Transition from real to new set-up
    • Third stage (optional): Transition from real to new set-upIn this set-up strategies of how a real set-up could be changed intoa set-up from the second stage, can be developped.
    • Fourth stage: MMOG Real-time strategy game play
    • Fourth stage: MMOG Real-time strategy game playOne can start now with a sim-city like set-up, where eachparticipant has enough for survival and a bit more. Depending onthe fixed amount of infrastructure/goods of the second stage onecan approximately determine (based on global resources etc.),which extra infrastructure/goods could provide an extra surplus(apart from the luxury distribution). The distribution of thissurplus (via money) and eventually the distribution of parts of theluxury distribution could be seen as an “economic surplus”, whichcan be distributed by the game participants. Income can begenerated from this surplus depending how “successful”investments are (in terms of an adjustable mix of revenue andsocalled beneficiary and eventually seperately beneficiaryinnovation points in replacement e.g. for patents).
    • Fourth stage: MMOG Real-time strategy game playcontinuationThe safety of the basic set-up of stage one has to be ensured, thiscan be done by mostly decoupling these needs from the market,like via state-owned housing, farm adoptions etc.Jobs shall be paid according to how unpleasant/dangerous thecorresponding work is. Eventually one could think about reducingpensions as corrective measure for fertility above replacement level.The goal is to find a stable game solution.
    • Thank you!