Flanders faw poster for aacaas
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Flanders faw poster for aacaas

on

  • 181 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
181
Views on SlideShare
181
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Flanders faw poster for aacaas Flanders faw poster for aacaas Presentation Transcript

  • Stopping the March of Fall Armyworms (Alabamas Sweep Net Monitoring Program) William "Ken" Kelley, Alabama Cooperative Extension System (175 4-H Ag Science Dr., Suite D, Brewton, AL 36426, kellewi@aces.edu) and Kathy Flanders, Auburn University (201 Extension Hall, Auburn University, AL 36849, flandkl@auburn.edu) Abstract Outcomes and ImpactsFall armyworms had a devastating impact on Alabama livestock  Cattlemen changed their behavior by using and forage producers in 2010. Drought conditions and high  the sweep nets to scout for fall temperatures provided an optimum environment for the pest to  armyworms.  The program saved forage do hundreds of thousands of dollars in damage to Alabama forage crops. The Alabama Cooperative Extension System and  producers of Alabama $800,000 in 2011. the Alabama Cattlemen’s Association worked together to help  Each cattleman who used a sweep net keep forage producers informed of armyworm movement and  saved an average  60 acres of forage on his management options in 2011 in an effort to keep from  farm by finding fall armyworms early, and replicating the disaster of 2010. Sweep nets were purchased by the Alabama Cattlemen’s Association and distributed by the  helped an average 1.3 other cattlemen find Alabama Cooperative Extension System. A YouTube video was  fall armyworms, resulting in 138 acres filmed to illustrate proper armyworm scouting techniques using  saved per sweep net. Program cost was the sweep nets. A timely information sheet was published  approximately $7,000, resulting in a return explaining armyworm movements and control, as well as how to use sweep nets. Sweep nets were distributed to numerous cattle  of $115 for each dollar of input cost.and forage producers, and to the local county extension offices.  Ken Kelley demonstrates proper use of a sweep net.Regional and County agents addressed local and state cattlemen’s groups to inform them of how to use the sweep nets and how to control armyworms if they were detected. A website was created to highlight where armyworms had been located in  Activities and Outputsthe state, and a listserv was formed to get the information to as  • 140 sweep nets ($30 each) were distributed to County large of an audience as possible. The program proved highly  Extension offices and Alabama Cattlemensuccessful, saving the forage producers of Alabama approximately $817,920.   • Stakeholders reported when and where fall armyworms had  been found in  Alabama forages • Alabamaarmyworms@aces.edu e‐mail listserv established to  inform stakeholders where and when armyworms had been  found in Alabama • Extension agents informed clientele about the sweep net  program via group meetings, phone calls, newspaper articles,  radio, Facebook or web pages, and  direct mail newsletters • The Alabama Cattlemen’s Association kept cattlemen  informed of the program and the presence of the fall  armyworm using blog posts, Facebook, and direct e‐mails to  their mailing list • Interactive map showed which cattlemen had sweep nets,  and documented where and when damaging fall armyworm  populations were discovered in summer 2011. See  Fall armyworms ate the grass in the pasture on the left, then moved into the  http://maps.acesag.auburn.edu/Alabama_Armyworm_Watch adjacent pasture. /default.aspx Fall armyworms were first found on July 3 (lightest gold  color).  By the end of August (red) fall armyworm outbreaks  The Situation   • YouTube video demonstrating how to look for fall armyworms  had been reported in two thirds of Alabamas 67 counties. All too often forage producers discover fall  (How to Use a Sweep Net to Find Fall Armyworms,  armyworms, Spodoptera frugiperda, after the  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71wdf8P33bQ insects have destroyed most of the forage crop.  • Two Alabama Cattlemen Magazine Articles explained biology  Each year, several million acres of forage in  and management of fall armyworms Alabama are vulnerable to attack by fall  armyworm, including bermudagrass hayfields,  summer forages such as brown‐top millet, and  bahiagrass pastures.   During the first 10 days of feeding, a fall  armyworm caterpillar does not eat much. If fall  armyworms can be found during this time, an  insecticide application can prevent the damage  that they cause. The objective of this program was  to show forage producers that they can avoid A fully grown  losing forage to fall armyworms by scouting fields fall armyworm Fall armyworms that were found using a sweep net. using a sweep net.