2011 suport workshop-new directions in e-learning towards the support of informal and social learning
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2011 suport workshop-new directions in e-learning towards the support of informal and social learning

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Presented at the Suport project meeting in Paris the 16 June 2011.

Presented at the Suport project meeting in Paris the 16 June 2011.
Suport project: http://www.suport-project.eu/en/

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  • Note: Au niveau de la mémoire à long terme, on peut distinguer (neuro-cognition): * La mémoire sémantique La mémoire épisodique La mémoire procédurale (non conscient)

2011 suport workshop-new directions in e-learning towards the support of informal and social learning 2011 suport workshop-new directions in e-learning towards the support of informal and social learning Presentation Transcript

  • New Directions in E-Learning: Towards the Support of Informal and Social Learning Thierry Nabeth Senior Research Fellow INSEAD Suport project Meeting Paris
    • … the delivery of boxed knowledge to a learner alone in front of his computer
    Objective of this presentation E-Learning is NOT only LMS
    • The individual is (more) self directed in his/her learning and is (more) autonomous
    • The learning process are more informal and more social (cf. Open Innovation, collective intelligence, etc.)
    • Note: Collective intelligence: a vision making a large part to … the individual
    Towards a self-directed individual … connected with others Learn (and do not copy!) I learn by myself and I interact with others
  • The learning modes Thierry Nabeth (1998); Virtual Learning Spaces: Expériences avec environnements de réalité virtuelle multi-utilisateurs accessibles via Internet dans l’enseignement ; 6eme Forum des innovations pédagogiques Learning by Absorbing Learning by Doing Learning by Interacting with others Theory (knowledge elicitation) Experimenting & practicing Simulation Knowledge Exchange Network Communities Lectures, readings Business Cases Multiplayer Simulation Virtual classroom Share experiences Learning 1.0 Learning 2.0
  • Types of memory, (understanding the brain)
    • Declarative memory
      • semantic memory
      • episodic memory
    • Procedural memory
      • (Routines, procedures)
    Localisation: Ongoing research in Brain sciences
  • Reference: Jane Hart (2009) The future of e-learning is social learning. C4LPT 2009 http://www.slideshare.net/janehart/supporting-formal-and-informal-sociil-learning Beyond formal personal e-learning Adapted from ( Jane Hart 2009 ). Social networking LMS 2.0; CSCL Social EPSS, Workplace learning LMS E-learning 1.0 Personal Informal (self-directed learning) Formal (supervised)
  • The learning modes Jane Hart (2009) The future of e-learning is social learning.Part 3: Supporting formal and informal social learning. C4LPT 2009 http://www.slideshare.net/janehart/the-future-of-elearning-is-social-learnng Adapted from ( Jane Hart 2009 ).
    • Provide a communication chanel for the acquisition of knowledge (sharing of experiences)
    • Help the individual to determine the relevance of knowledge.
    • Help to provide meaning to the content (knowledge is socially constructed)
    • Position the individual as an acteur (participation).
    • Contribute to the motivation of the individual
    Reference: Seely Brown, John; Adler, Richard P. (2008). Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0. EDUCAUSE Review. 43(1):16–32 (January/February 2008):. http://www.educause.edu/library/erm0811 Social Learning (Seely Brown & Adler 2008). Reference: Seely Brown, John; Adler, Richard P. (2008). Minds on Fire: Open Education, the Long Tail, and Learning 2.0. EDUCAUSE Review. 43(1):16–32 (January/February 2008):. http://www.educause.edu/library/erm0811
    • Access to sources “tacit knowledge”
    • Forum posts
    • Conversations
    • etc.
    • Motive the individual
    • Man is a social animal (Spinoza) - Man is a political animal ( Aristote)
    • The social has Neurocognitive basis
    • contribution to intrinsic motivation
      • A channel of meta-communication
      • Non-verbal communication
      • Orientation of attention
      • Assess the pertinence & confidence of knowledge
      • A form of “conditioning”
    The role of the “social” in learning
  • Directions & Risks
    • Support the social process in the e-learning platforms (e.g. support of non-verbal communication )
    • Use also the public platforms (e.g. Facebook, Twitter) for supporting the informal processes
    • Nourish the flux so as to repeatedly expose learner to content … so as a way to “imprint” knowledge and make it sticky
    • Interaction overload
    • Participation dropout
    • Effort required to manage all this interaction
    • What about the involvement of the professors?
  • Reference: Tapio Koskinen (2010). Design for Learning. Brussels – November 26, 2010 http://www.slideshare.net/cascatelli/design-learn-tapio26112010 Types of delivery models (Tapio Koskinen 2010). 1. Training as usual 2. Blended Learning 3. Learning in Distance 4. Virtual World Training Participation Requires physical presence Flexible participation Very flexible participation Flexible participation Module size 2-3 days each 2-3 days each and Webinars 90 minutes each 1 hour …. Half day 1 hour …. Half day Group size Apr 30 Apr 30 Flexible Flexible Roll out 1 group / location / Q 1 group / location / Q Good scalability Good scalability Costing Low sunk cost, High variable cost Moderate sunk cost, Moderate variable cost High sunk cost, Low variable cost Very high sunk cost, Low variable cost Success criteria Support of group learning. Support of group learning during the F2F module. Professionally produced Webinars Online learner support Good Virtual World Architecture Risks, opportunities, strengths Good potential for physical presence enabled peer learning. Lots of travel time and cost Moderate travel time and cost. Learning benefits from extended lead time. Requires commitment and motivation from the learners – Flexible scheduling. No travelling required. Little known territory - Good opportunities for gaming and simulation. No travelling required.
  • Reference: Downes Stephan (2011): After Moodle. http://www.slideshare.net/Downes/after-moodle Contructivism / Connectionism (Downes 2011)
  • Thank you
    • Thierry Nabeth : Senior Research Fellow, INSEAD [email_address]