Photography monthly201401

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Photography monthly201401

  1. 1. Issue 156 January 2014 Take, make, share and be social... Take, make, share and be social... History Portraits DIY Photo Events The Rise of Pentax Winter Style Frame Illusion Get Out With Your Camera Nikon Df New Harry Potter’s Train Fuji X-E2 *Ilford *Portraits *Landscapes Ricoh HZ15 & White Travel on Shoot Macro Snowflakes m w G ph . ww IN Paint The Moon AG gr o ot IM ym h ap £3 Competition on .99 th co ly.
  2. 2. JANUARY 2014 – ISSUE 156 | FROM THE TEAM Website Welcome NET WORKS s b e W e t i Facebook photographymonthly.com upload | download | news | views Twitter facebook.com/photographymonthly upload | competitions | read | share © Karl Redshaw I ’ve just looked through and totted up; we have three new features in this month’s magazine. MOMENTS (pages 16-17) is a new picture-led spread that we have included, just for fun. We’ve asked readers and contributors alike for those photo bombs, special moments and candid captures that celebrate humour and laughter. We realised that we don’t do this enough. We have also created a gallery on the PM website and would invite you to upload your image, or images, for inclusion on these pages going forward. BLACK & WHITE (pages 39-53) is a love of ours so we have introduced a brand new section where we take a closer look at this wonderful style of photography. This month we chat with Ilford Harman about the resurgence of film, interview folk rock-band member Ted Dwane – a hugely keen and talented photographer, and lover of black and white – and take a look at his recent pop-up studio project he recently shot. Lastly, we have a stunning mono technique masterpiece from Justin Minns, who shares just how you can shoot a similar image. CAMERA TRAVELS (pages 57-63) does what it says on the tin really. Will Roberts takes his trusty Nikon on the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, the train used as the Hogwarts Express in the Harry Potter films, and creates a sort of travelogue of images en route. From the start and finish locations to what he sees on the way; details, architecture, landscapes, anything that makes a pretty picture. But we have loads of additional inspiration too, from stunning winter portraits to amazing macro snowflakes, the history of Pentax and gear tests too. See you soon. Enjoy the issue. www.photographymonthly.com PHO Photo TV @photomonthly follow | read | share TO photographymonthly.com/phototv watch | learn | enjoy Lorna Dockerill Features Editor lorna.dockerill@archant.co.uk Noel Hibbert Art Editor noel.hibbert@archant.co.uk Jessica Bracey Features Writer jessica.bracey@archant.co.uk Jade Price Multimedia Writer jade.price@archant.co.uk Adam Scorey Group Editor, Imaging adam.scorey@archant.co.uk Instagram: scoreyeditor Contibutors This month Annabelle Manning Paint the Moon Andrea Denniss Portrait Photographer Ted Dwane Musican / Photographer Neale James Wedding Photographer Alexey Kljatov Landscape Photographer Justin Minns Designer & Photographer Kevin Mullins Wedding Photographer Will Roberts Writer & Photographer Karl Shaw Portrait Photographer QUICK FLICK MUSTS Charley Yates Editorial Apprentice charley.yates@archant.co.uk P39 | P47 | P57 | P68 photographymonthly.com | 3
  3. 3. JANUARY CONTENTS 12 A CUPPA WITH EX RADIO ONE PRESENTER COME PHOTOGRAPHER, NEALE JAMES 47 INTERVIEW TED DWANE TELLS US WHY HE’S IN LOVE WITH BLACK AND WHITE 78 EVENTS CAMERA ITCHING TO COME OUT? HERE’S OUR LIST OF TOP EVENTS 4 | REGULARS 3 WELCOME | THE CONTRIBUTORS 8-9 WOW! PICTURE 10 TECH SPY NEWS 12-13 A CUPPA WITH NEALE JAMES 14 OUR APPS 18-25 READERS’ GALLERY 28-35 TREAT: HISTORY OF PENTAX 54-55 SUBSCRIBE TO PM 28 HISTORY OF... PENTAX – HOW THE COMPANY HAS MADE A NAME FOR ITSELF 57 LANDSCAPES WE THOUGHT IT’S ABOUT TIME WE TOOK A GREAT BRITISH JOURNEY 82 DIY PROJECT HOW TO CREATE YOUR OWN SUPER MACRO LENS 39 B&W SPECIAL LET US INTRODUCE YOU TO OUR LUXURIOUS B&W SECTION 68 PORTRAITS ASPIRE LEADS THE WAY IN PERFECT PORTRAITS ONCE AGAIN 100 GEAR IS THE NIKON DF THE PERFECT FUSION OF RETRO AND MODERN?
  4. 4. JANUARY CONTENTS P27 PAINT THE MOON ACTIONS COVER IMAGE This wonderfully winter themed image taken by Andrea Denniss reflects the potential of this season. Hopefully, you’ll feel inspired to wrap up and head out into the frost yourself. Find out more on page 68! A WIN!!! 4 6 | PRE ORDER THE NEXT ISSUE AND SAVE £1 Use discount code GG21 at www.buyamag.co.uk/PM FUJI STEPS UP WITH A NEW SUCCESSOR, THE X-E2 DIY PHOTOGRAPHER 82-85 MAKING A MACRO LENS 86-87 FRAMING WITH ONE VISION GEAR 90-95 FUJI X-E2 96-99 RICOH HZ15 100-103 NIKON DF thinking abo ose ut r th m fo a PAGE 106 r caree 5 ISSUES FOR £5 PA GE 5 LANDSCAPES NEW! 57-63 CAMERA TRAVELS – NORTH YORKS MOORS RAILWAY 65 BUYERS’ GUIDE TO OUTDOOR GEAR PORTRAITS 68-75 SEASONAL PORTRAITS EVENTS 78-79 THE WEEKENDER GEAR ga kin CR BS I B E SU NEW! MOMENTS 16-17 PHOTO FUNNIES HISTORY 28-35 THE POWER OF PENTAX NEW! BLACK AND WHITE SPECIAL 40-45 ILFORD TALK B&W FILM 47-51 MUMFORD & SONS TED DWANE 52-53 LONG EXPOSURE TECHNIQUE WIN!! WIN!! WIN!! 90 s prize mazing Our m aga zin e WIN to take advantage of the cool light TURNING PRO fro y. m photograph
  5. 5. 8 | N n ik o D 70 0 ec |f /4 |I SO 64 0 SE W ba w w BAS IM O st w TI AG W |N ia .f AN E ik ko nL a c B ! r7 uc eb LU Y 020 zy o CZ 0m w ok Y m oP .c W f/4 ho o m O |1 20 to / m m sp |1 ac /5 00 e s Se
  6. 6. I w a m o s ab un wa to ou tain lkin go t ho s a g i al w a nd n a te one br th is m a lli gi ng int ave p hi o t ma ictu cal s f he re n, fo ai de r e s th da de s r t fu p in l c k fo pite ict om re hi s a the pa st a s fe sh o P ni n on d c ars, rt olis an de sto h to ry ci b ‘w ai e s des t’. ee n An image that makes you go... WOW! | photographymonthly.com | 9
  7. 7. P| Technology News and Comment HOT Always in-the-know about what’s hot and what’s not in the photo gadget world, we bring you the industry’s latest technical offerings the ff o ss re p tech L ok Cloak bag Claiming to be the ‘world’s first shoot-through camera bag’, this handy gadget should be a useful addition to anyone’s kit. Offering full cover and protection for your DSLR, the open ended bag enables you to fully operate and shoot your camera with room to fit your hands in. It also has pockets for storing memory cards and batteries. There’s no need to pause and unpack for each shot while on the go with this product! $49/£30 www.cloakbags.com The Vanguard Heralder 46 This ultimate daypack is all about offering security and protection for your kit. It boasts large storage capabilities and has quick access points for reaching pieces of kit in a hurry when on the go. The bag can hold a DSLR with a telephoto lens attached and two or three additional lenses, a flash and a laptop. It has a tripod carrying system, rain cover and pocket storage! What more could you want? £190. www.vanguardworld.com The universal flash filter kit Experiment with light and colour with this 20-colour rainbow edition of filters for your external flash. The filters have been designed to easily slip on and off for easy experimentation in different light situations. The collection comes in a compact case with colour dividers and the filters boast being fully crinkle-proof. $30/£19 www.photojojo.com ocket P dgets Ga the Pocket reflector Carrying a lot of kit can be hard going, except when it’s pocket sized! The pocket reflector will double your available light but is small enough to carry without any effort. When its needed, it easily pops out and can be used for anything from adding light to someone’s face for a portrait to a still life shoot. $15/£9 www.photojojo.com Proviz Flare Whether it’s used to assist you in finding your way through your kit bag, on night shoots or as a tool in the shot itself (for long exposures), the Proviz Flare is a handy companion for a photographer. The flare is powered by two AA batteries that allow it to burn for approximately 60-70 hours. The lights come in blue, red or green and simply clip onto your bag, jacket or anything else you can think of via its handy carabiner clip. £25 www.provizsports.com 10 | Studiohut cube axis bubble We’ve all felt the pain of taking what we thought was a great shot, only to later find the image is on the wonk. But gone are those lopsided days with the bubble axis cube. Fitting onto the hot shoe of your DSLR, simply sliding on the cube filled with multiple bubble levels means you can be certain that you’re keeping your horizons on track. £5.95 www.amazon.co.uk
  8. 8. A cuppa with… Neale James From Radio 1 presenter to professional wedding photographer, Jessica Bracey finds out about swapping sound for pictures with Neale James How did you first gain an interest in photography? I’m not sure that I always had an active interest, though from my teens I owned some SLRs like a Zenit, and I distinctly remember being leant a tripod by my uncle, that certainly made me feel like the real deal. My interest grew further during an arts programme I presented on BBC Radio Cambridgeshire where one of the regular guests was a regional newspaper photographer. I’m still in touch with him from time to time, odd to be on the same playing field professionally now. Was photography a big part of your life during your days at Radio 1? Unfortunately no; a great shame, particularly when I remember the people I met and things I saw. My father bought me a Nikon TW Zoom 105, which at the time was one of the top-line film compacts. That was in 1992, along with the words: “You see so much great stuff son, you should really record it.” I did take some pictures with it, but not enough. It still has a roll of film in. God knows what’s on it! The BBC did however give me a chance to learn a little more about photography and I certainly used that opportunity. How was the transition going from radio presenter to wedding photographer? It’s been a slow curve to be honest. For the first four or five years of the decade I turned professional I couldn’t quite believe I was doing what I did and not because I felt charmed, or somehow luckier than most, it was because I felt like some kind of visitor in the profession. I certainly worked hard at it, knuckled down and put the hours in, but there were plenty of days I didn’t feel half as comfortable as when sat in a studio with a pair of headphones waffling! But now I feel comfortable in my photographic shoes, still far more to achieve of course, but I’m no longer a visitor. What is it about wedding photography that you like the most? Wedding work was pretty much from the start a real injection of freedom. Apart from some set family portraiture, you really are your own boss and there’s a great emphasis on you having to know your 12 | onions. I like that. So it’s the freedom and frankly emotional exchange that drives me. I can’t think of another accessible genre that allows me to see so many differing levels of emotion on a day-to-day basis. You’ve shot some pretty high profile weddings such a Chris Tarrant’s daughter Fia, is there anyone else you would like to photograph? Radio presenters know me, well, some still do! That does bring me a reasonable amount of broadcaster weddings, though I turned down a wedding unwittingly for a broadcaster who inspired me to get into that industry in the first place. Boy did I kick myself hard! I’d certainly like to photograph more musicians. There’s something about a wedding when the people getting wed are creative; there’s often a higher sense of emotion to the day. Photographing higher profile weddings is an interesting part of my work. I don’t do a lot of it, but when I do I usually can’t raise the bragging flag. Celebs are a private type of client. Who has been an inspiration to your work? From weddings then, without a doubt Jeff Ascough is an important figure for me. His work has a high level of maturity and reason – and that’s something that is misunderstood and misrepresented in our business. From America, Joe Buissink. I love his story; a man who at 45 changed his life on the back, pretty much, of one photograph, an image that persuaded him that story telling could and would be a valid proposition. His work is excellent and I can really engage with the emotion he shows. Do you have a favourite image by another photographer? Too many! Some would certainly belong to the photographers above. Of late though it’s a landscape picture taken, developed and printed by a good friend of mine, an ex army news photographer called Giles Penfound, that my wife gave to my brother-in-law as a present! I saw it the other day, propped up in his lounge, still not hung. If I see it like that again I’m nicking it back! There’s a depth to that photograph that captivates me. Is there a photograph of yours which is a favourite? They fluctuate year to year to be fair. But probably the most
  9. 9. Neale James | important photograph I have taken in terms of presenting to prospective clients and being recognised for, is the daughter cradling her mother’s face in her outstretched hand. I have a massive print of that picture to the right of where I sit in my office, and it reminds me that this is what I seek every time I go to a wedding; honest, real, almost tunnel vision moments. The mother was congratulating her daughter following the ceremony, though there is an undertone of the absence of the bride’s father and I think the whole thing shows in the exchange. It’s not a perfect photograph, there’s a jaunty angle which troubles me slightly. I can say with all genuine honesty that this photograph affects some people in quite clear ways. I was exhibiting at a London wedding fayre and one chap couldn’t stop crying every time he saw that picture. They booked there and then. What’s the best piece of advice you have been given? The most influential advice given in my life would certainly have been my late father, who showed me that belief is so much more powerful than initial skill. I hear my early radio shows and wince at what I sounded like. I see my early photographs and wonder what on earth I was even looking at when taking the photograph. But somehow my father’s philosophy has carried me through both my careers and I certainly wouldn’t be doing what can do now, if it weren’t for him. He’s hugely missed. [PM] www.nealejames.com photographymonthly.com | 13
  10. 10. Moments It’s easy to forget just how much laughter an accidental snap can bring. In our latest feature, we showcase your fantastic funnies, photo bombs and great captionable candids P hotography should be fun. And generally it is of course. But we don’t always celebrate the funny side of things, the humorous, accidental images that we sometimes capture on our cameras. So we thought why not put a selection of those we have found this month, from readers, staff and contributors alike. It’s just for fun, to make us all smile. We have set up a gallery on the Photography Monthly website, so please head over there and add your own photo funny. Who knows, we may even feature it in a forthcoming issue. Upload www.photographymonthly. com/gallery 16 |
  11. 11. Photo Funnies | James Eldridge - A Little Help? Nikon D7000 | 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 | 90mm | 1/160sec | f/5.6 | ISO 100 @J_EldridgePhoto v e K M n i - Every stolen moment counts… though this is actually thenvicar’s wife! u i l s Fuji X-Pro1 | 60mm | 1/125sec | f/4 | ISO 200 Kevin Mullins - Get me out of this grip-and-grin hell! Canon EOS 5D Mark III | 35mm f/1.4 | 1/125sec | f/11 | ISO 1000 @kevin_mullins photographymonthly.com | 17
  12. 12. Mojca Cvirn - Into the Unknown Olympus E-510 | 14-42mm | 14mm | 1sec | f/4 | ISO 100 READERS’ Gallery Low Light 18 | Like an image and want to know how they took it? Maybe you’d like to compliment the photographer? Tweet them and tag us in @photomonthly
  13. 13. Readers’ Pictures | Julian Fraser - Night Caller Nikon D700 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 50mm | 1sec | f/2.8 | ISO 200 Twitter Facebook follow | read | share Margherita von Aulock - Optics Canon 60D | 60mm f/2.8 | 1/640sec | f/4 | ISO 100 photographymonthly.com | 19
  14. 14. | Readers’ Pictures PRE ORDER THE NEXT ISSUE AND SAVE £1 20 | el Sh lia ju @ Julian Fraser - Under the Bridge Panasonic DMC-LX7 | 4.7mm | 8 secs | f/8 | ISO 80 nf 19 72 Jamie Brown - Lying Under the Night Nikon D7100 | 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 | 18mm | 30secs | f/3.5 | ISO 1600 @ A D @ DAX Paulino - Kimi the Cat Canon EOS 400D | 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 | 55mm | 1/10sec | f/5.6 | ISO 1600 X_ Pa ta ul 7 in o Use discount code GG21 at www.buyamag.co.uk/PM
  15. 15. @ vi nc iv o n Vincenzo De Simone - Lighting Life Canon EOS 550D | 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 | 35mm | 5 secs | f/5 | ISO 100 24 | pu du @ Catherine Dupuy - Reflections Canon 600D | 28-75mm f/2.8 | 75mm | 30secs | f/13 | ISO 100 String of LED lights scrunched up together y_ 55 Jamie Brown - Silhouetted Wheels Nikon D7100 | 70-300mm f/4-5.6 | 300mm | 1/3000sec | f/11 | ISO 400
  16. 16. Readers’ Pictures | Karen Shivas - Night Light Canon 6D | 24-105mm f/4 | 50mm | 1/320sec | f/11 | ISO 1000 @ ka re ns 19 61 Ewan Arnolda - Princes Pier at Night Canon 5D Mark III | 24-105mm f/4 | 24mm | 113 secs | f/11 | ISO 100 Julian Fraser - Tree Nikon D700 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 50mm | 1sec | f/2.8 | ISO 200 @ @ ju ju lia lia nf nf 19 19 72 72 Julian Fraser - City Seascape Nikon D700 | 24-70mm f/2.8 | 24mm | 15 secs | f/2.8 | ISO 200 Inma Rodriguez - Shadows Nikon D5100 | 17-50mm f/2.8 | 22mm | 13secs | f/10 | ISO 100 @ ro b er tp ac k8 4 Robert Pack - Slains Castle Sunset Canon 7D | 10-20mm f/4-5.6 | 12mm | 30secs | f/25 | ISO 100 10 Stop ND filter photographymonthly.com | 25
  17. 17. | Advertorial Protect your Possessions with Photoguard Specialists in providing insurance for photographers’ most valuable asset, their gear, we hear from Ryan of Ryan Phillips Photography who has reaped the benefits of getting cover from Photoguard Why did you submit an insurance claim? Last year I was on an early morning photo shoot when a stranger attacked me and stole my camera equipment. Not only was this deeply upsetting, it was also extremely frustrating as I lost the photos I’d taken. I immediately contacted Photoguard, my insurance provider. The first thing they asked me was “are you okay?” This sympathetic approach set the tone for many of the conversations I had with them regarding the claim. It was like speaking to a friend. Knowing I was covered by specialist insurance took a huge weight off my shoulders. Why do you have insurance? I tour with pop stars and shoot on location for major fashion labels. When I’m out and about using my equipment, the last thing I want to worry about is whether I’m covered if something goes wrong. My policy allows me to take all my equipment – camera, laptop, memory cards and software – out of my house, meaning I can focus on my work with complete peace of mind. If I accidentally damage my camera and need a new one, my policy also entitles me to a replacement on a new-for-old basis so I’m not left out of pocket. How long have you had photography insurance? I’ve had specialist insurance since becoming a freelancer three years ago. A friend of mine – also a long-standing photographer – recommended Photoguard. He mentioned their excellent customer service and said how straightforward his dealings with them had been. The first thing I thought about when arranging my insurance was that the process was going to be long-winded and expensive. With Photoguard, thankfully, it turned out to be neither. What does specialist insurance offer you that a typical household insurance policy doesn’t? In my experience, insurance policies vary greatly, and I’d always recommend photographers look beyond the price and make sure the cover is fit for purpose. My home insurers were going to charge me an additional premium because I had expensive photography equipment, while they also wouldn’t cover my professional photography activities. I therefore decided that specialist insurance was a better option for me in the long run. How important is public liability and professional indemnity cover to you? Very. I was shooting on a busy high street with lighting stands cables and crew in the days before I had public liability cover. Thankfully nothing went wrong with the job, but I remember feeling slightly uneasy – so much so that I arranged public liability cover soon after. Professional indemnity is also essential because it covers me if I fail to deliver what I’ve been contracted to deliver, against subsequent legal action by an unsatisfied client and for the costs involved in having to reshoot if I’m found to be at fault. Do you feel specialist photography insurance offers good value for money? After I started freelancing and set up my own business, I started shopping around for an insurance policy. Some of the insurance companies I spoke to quoted me rather inflated premiums, but Photoguard’s policy offered me exactly what I needed, both in terms of cover and price. What’s more, the Photoguard team didn’t adjust my renewal terms after I made a claim. They just seem to know what photographers need before we do. To me, that’s perfect. 0844 826 2294 www.photoguard.co.uk 26 |
  18. 18. PM | Paint the Moon competition We announce the second winner in our Paint the Moon competition, brought to life with a beautiful new set • © Jolanta Macionczyk • AFTER BEFORE • WIN Ama zing prize s • I n our sixth-month competition our second winner has been chosen from your uploaded images to our online gallery. Lucky winner Jolanta Macionczyk was made even luckier when Paint the Moon’s Annie Manning used the brand new Grace Collection to edit the winning photo Oscar and Olivia. Annie used the Grace Collection action with Light Reflector, Poetic, Background Colour Palette (Paint On Light) and Pink Sugar Matte. Jolanta will receive a prize code to spend on actions from Paint the Moon. To see what your images could look like, and for your chance to win an action voucher, simply upload your best UNEDITED portrait to our Paint the Moon category on our online gallery at www.photographymonthly. com. Remember the entries must have NO post production applied to them whatsoever. You can read our full review of the Grace Collection in next month’s issue of the magazine, so watch this space! www.paintthemoon.net 27 | photographymonthly.com | 27
  19. 19. “The name Pentax is derived from the words Pentaprism and Reflex” Timeline 1919 Originally founded as Asahi Optical Joint Stock Co, its shop in Tokyo became one of the leading lens suppliers to Japanese camera and optical instrument manufacturers 1923 Asahi begin to produce AOCO lenses for the movie industry – a first of its kind in Japan 1932 Asahi begin to manufacture wartime optical products such as binoculars and range finders 1945 Research begins on the SLR camera 1952 Launch of Japan’s first 35mm SLR camera the Asahiflex I and features a cloth curtain focal plane shutter and include speeds ranging from 1/20sec to 1/500sec and a Bulb setting 1954 An exclusive Pentax innovation the Asahiflex II features the world’s first instant return mirror system 28 | “We are committed to providing excellence to improve the quality of living.” As far as mission statements go, those 12 words are a bold promise. But as an outsider, welcomed into the Pentax community at the Meet Britain competition exhibition last year, I witnessed brand loyalty like never before. Cameras proudly hanging around necks, passed down from generation to generation, and an appreciation for each other’s work, proudly displayed on the walls of the London Design Museum. Regarding design, it’s Pentax’s innovation in optics over the past 90 years that has elevated it to the trusted and sought after brand it is today. During a time which saw the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, the authorisation of prohibition in America and Felix the Cat become the most popular animated character, Pentax’s elevation towards the roaring 20s was a prominent one. With passion and expertise in optics from the start, the original Asahi Optical Joint Stock Co. opened its very first shop in 1919, and became Japan’s leading supplier for camera and optical instrument lenses. Soon to become the first providers of lenses for the Japanese movie industry with the AOCO lenses, its responses to culture and current affairs saw it sustain its success and the consumers’ desire to invest in products that aided vital activities. In 1932, Pentax manufactured wartime optical products such as binoculars and range finders. At the start of Japan’s camera boom in 1931, encouraged by government sponsored programs, Pentax concentrated on lenses but soon saw potential in the commercial imaging industry. In the 26 years following the company’s launch, the Japanese manufacturer, whose specialism during those few decades lay in optics, began research into developing a camera line. It led to Japan’s first 35mm SLR, the Asahiflex I. It took seven years of hard graft and design geeks hiding behind closed doors to unveil such a revolutionary camera. The Asahiflex featured a cloth curtain focal plane shutter and allowed photographers to shoot at speeds between 1/20sec to 1/500sec. The flash of inspiration sparked the mainstream camera market, and a stream of bodies came to the forefront with a particular mention to the Asahiflex II, which was an exclusive Pentax innovation featuring the world’s first instant return mirror system, in 1954. Continuing with the Pentax branding in 1957 up until the current day, its string of world firsts in the industry and determination to deliver systems to the mainstream continued climbed. In 1966, Pentax had produced its one millionth 35mm SLR. But its commitment to serve the Average Joe photographer with affordable products led it to step up a gear with the introduction of the 6x7in medium format camera, enticing professional photographers and amateurs alike. Staying true to its specialism, in 1919 Pentax continued to strive to better itself when it came to optics. At the beginning of the 70s, the Asahi Optical Takumar lens series innovated how lenses performed by reducing ghosting and lens flare. This inspired brands to try and follow in its footsteps but they didn’t manage to catch up with this new revolution for photographers The of
  20. 20. Pentax | until a decade later. However, the true golden age for Pentax was in 1976. While Abba’s Dancing Queen was riding top of the charts in Sweden and Great Britain was revelling in the rock masterpiece Bohemian Rhapsody, Pentax released a camera that people still cherish to this very day: the Pentax ME. The same year, it released the K1000 and has sold over three million units – it was a particularly popular choice amongst students. Shipped overseas to the US where the body complete with a SMX Pentax-M 50mm f/2 lens originally sold for $220, its price rose and rose to $315 in 1994. Its price was then fixed until the K1000 was discontinued, in 1997. The mid 70s continued to be a buzz decade for the Japanese camera brand, thanks to the launch of the Pentax K series, the smallest and lightest SLR on the market, the MX, and the System 10 camera – another world first with the 110 pocket SLR interchangeable lenses. Gliding through the 80s with revolutions in autofocus cameras and built-in autoflash, the 90s witnessed Pentax tailoring its products not only to the calling of the photographer and what was required out of them when it came to photo shoots, but also to their lifestyle. At the turn of the 90s, photographers were able to dunk their cameras underwater and could withstand all manners of weather conditions, so there was no need to pack that extra mini anorak for your camera. Pentax’s ability to understand the lifestyle of its consumers, their wants and needs when it comes to a camera, enabled amateurs and professionals alike to take In our ongoing series celebrating the history behind some of their body wherever they wanted, our favourite camera brands, Jessica Bracey takes a look at whenever they wanted. The proof pinnacles of Pentax’s past was in the pudding with the launch of the world’s first autofocus medium format SLR, the 645N. To the weather resistant zoom compact, the IQZoom 90 WR, adventurer Steve Irwin was a brand ambassador. Now we know that camera manufacturers love a bit of celebrity endorsement, but Pentax source genuine Pentax users who believe in the products and innovation. Speaking to avid photographer, presenter and ambassador for the brand, Reggie Yates, at the Meet Britain exhibition hosted by Pentax to celebrate the tongue-in-cheek culture of the country, he said: “I’m a massive fan of photography and always have been. I love capturing images and the minute I got my first SLR, that’s when it stepped up a massive amount.” Speaking of the mirrorless Q10 and K-5 II DSLR, he continued: “I think these cameras are great and it’s a good opportunity for someone who isn’t an expert in photography to be able to do really interesting things. You >> History PENTAX “The 645 was named Professional Camera of the Year 1985 in the UK” photographymonthly.com | 29
  21. 21. VIEWRANGER - THE APP FOR ADVENTURE As Outdoors Enthusiasts ourselves, we set out to build a GPS service that was truly ‘up to the job’, so whilst there are lots of apps out there that can locate you on a map, we wanted to go a lot further than that! With ViewRanger on your smartphone or tablet, we’re confident you’ll get even more from your favourite outdoors pursuits. THE APP FOR ADVENTURE ViewRanger is the complete mapping, navigation & guided trail service for Outdoor Enthusiasts. The app & free web tools will help you at every stage of your adventure. EASY TO PLAN TRIPS Create & follow your own routes or simply download one from our massive library. Instantly share to Facebook or Twitter to invite your friends too. PEACE OF MIND ON THE TRAIL Choose the best map to use and always know your mapped location, even where there’s no mobile signal. Get navigation alerts and view real time stats. SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES Create a record of every adventure to keep, share or publish, even add photos. Share your location from the trail with BuddyBeacon. DOWNLOAD HERE www.viewranger.com in safe hands TECHNOLOGY EQUIPPED FOR GRIP YOU WON’T REALISE YOU’RE MACWET GLOVES PROVIDE: L INCREDILBLE TOUCH AND FEEL OR HUMID CONDITIONS WEARING THEM! L UNRIVALLED GRIP IN DRY, WET L THE PERFECT FIT  AVAILABLE IN 14 SIZES L A CHOICE OF 6 COLOURS, TWO STYLES AND TWO CUFF LENGTHS L DURABLILITY  MACHINE WASHABLE AND LONGLASTING TO ORDER CALL: 0845 6039075 | Email: info@macwet.com | www.macwet.com
  22. 22. Pentax | “Pentax celebrates its 50th anniversary in the same year that man landed on the moon, in 1969” can edit on these cameras as well which is something I haven’t seen before. Some of these new releases are not necessarily SLRs so it’s not as scary or daunting in terms of all the controls compared to bigger bodies.” With that said, Pentax to this day stand by the enthusiasts who like to experiment and have fun with photography, whether that’s with a CSC, DSLR, weather-proof compact or traditional analogue, they are forever innovating and in the last year have included the style conscious crowd with the 12MP Q10, complete with full HD video and available in 100 different colours. As 1957 The Asahi Pentax was the first to be marketed under the name Pentax and featured a pentaprism utilised in the SLR viewfinder – the first of its kind – and is well received for its upright eye-level viewfinder photography is becoming more accessible than ever with smartphones getting people excited about imagery and pushing them to step up their gear choices, Pentax are one step ahead. They may have a smaller voice and presence when compared to the big guys, but insist that high quality and affordable pricing go hand in hand to push them forward. In 2008, Pentax collaborated with Samsung to release DSLR sisters, the Pentax K10D, K20D, Samsung GX-10 and GX-20. Pentax lenses have also been rebranded and sold as Samsung Schneider Kreuznach >> 1958 1962 1959 1966 The semi automatic diaphragm and micro-prism viewfinder Pentax K is launched Pentax introduce its first massproduced camera, the H2 Pentax release the first ever Japanese camera to feature a clip on exposure metre, the H3V After 14 years of manufacturing, Pentax produces its one millionth 35mm SLR photographymonthly.com | 31
  23. 23. Pentax | In 1987 the IQZoom is named Best Compact Camera in Europe 1987-1988 by TIPA “The Ricoh group, in which Pentax sits, has worldwide sales of $23 billion” “The K in the Pentax K stands for King, as in King of SLRs” D-Xenon and D-Xenogon for Samsung DSLRs. Now operating in more than 200 countries, the renamed Ricoh umbrella was reported to have worldwide sales of $23billion in 2012. Looking to the future, Pentax continue to evolve and in August 2013 the company’s name was changed to Ricoh Imaging Company, Ltd after the alteration from Pentax Ricoh Imaging Company, Ltd in 2011 and the acquisition of all outstanding shares in the Pentax Imaging Corporation. In its official statement, the re-named company said: “The company’s goal is to leverage the tremendous strength and awareness of the Ricoh brand along with the superior technical innovation of Pentax products to deliver a world-class consumer experience.” Despite name changes left right and centre, the >> 1969 Pentax move into the professional market by releasing the 6 x 7 medium format camera 1975 The Pentax K series is introduced and includes a bayonet lens mount A popular choice amongst students, the K1000 is released overseas 1971 1976 1977 The breakthrough Asahi Optical Takumar lens series with its SMC system innovates lenses by reducing flare and ghosting Pentax release the ME, the first camera to eliminate manual shutter speed control – a revolutionary concept at the time 1976 The System 10 camera is the world’s first and only 110 pocket SLR with interchangeable lenses photographymonthly.com | 33
  24. 24. 1980 Pentax release the ME-F. It is the world’s first TTL SLR autofocus camera 1987 The SF-1 becomes the world’s first AF SLR with built-in auto flash 1991 Pentax release the world’s first weather resistant zoom compact camera the IQZoom 90 WR 1997 The world’s first autofocus medium format SLR camera the 645N 2011 Pentax launch the world’s smallest and lightest interchangeable lens camera, the Pentax Q “In December 2011, Pentax became the official sponsor of Dijon Football Club in France” 2013 Company name is changed to Pentax Ricoh Imaging Company, Ltd We asked you on our social networks: What do you love about the Pentax brand and what are your memories? Monika Zieba – Been my friend for the past 15 years, absolutely never let me down. I’m on a second body, affordable and comfortable Courtney Louise-Photography – It was my first point and shoot camera aged nine @cherdkuhn My father shot Pentax, I learned on Pentax and still shoot Pentax today. Husband’s story is the same. Very brand loyal @charmanphoto K1000…best learner camera ever @WFSamuelson Still creating memories with my old Pentax Auto 110 thanks to Lomo film, cracking little camera @jaybrooksphoto K1000 all the way 34 | “Pentax was the first manufacturer to produce 10 million SLR cameras in 1981”
  25. 25. Pentax | Pentax name has, and seemingly always will, allow people to explore and record the world to another level. With its back-history and continued technological advances, we can vouch for the commitment to improving quality of living with its products. With Pentax’s endless list of world firsts, that have paved the way for other manufacturers. It’s also down to its ever loyal community of followers, who continue to enjoy the experience of sharing the stories behind their pictures, who ensure and are the product of the company’s commitment to provide excellence and improve the quality of living. Its mission is well in hand. [PM] www.ricoh-imaging.co.uk photographymonthly.com | 35
  26. 26. Filter magic Thanks to the ever-growing popularity of the smartphone simple apps, we can dedicate a whole gallery to your Snapseed and Instagram shots! Tony Cook - Blue Doors Jamie Stephenson - Ethereal Grasmere Jamie Stephenson - Eye Spy Jamie Stephenson - Notre Dame De L’Assomption WWW.PHOTOGRAPHYMONTHLY.COM/GALLERY 36 |
  27. 27. New H W ITE © ANDY FREER Delivering handmad something made to the arte with skill, Photog with creativity, w printing, to– yes we said art raphy Monthly is tr hether it’s presen monotone pioneering photo– of black and w eating you to a whted in digital form hit ole form, we’r g o e showcasraphers and those e photography. F section dedicate r d rom proc ing a gen that captu e re enjoye d by everyre the finest of mosses and m other gen re out the ents in re photographymonthly.com | 39
  28. 28. Karl Redshaw - Mam Tor Canon 5D Mark III | 17-40mm f/4 | 25mm | 1/6sec | f/22 | ISO 100 Not Such a Black and White Story Whether you like to capture something abstract, or you dabble in personal portraits, take some on-the-sly street shots or simply enjoy composing a landscape panorama, there is no other genre that fits in neatly to all of the above and more, than black and white photography. 40 |
  29. 29. Black & White | N ow the argument may lie in whether it is a genre, an art form or simply an equated decision to whichever process you decide to divulge into – analogue or digital – the monotone magic will forever charm its way through the history books and tantalise the onlooker with its dramatic and thought-provoking tones that takes us to a deep and emotive place. As Don McCullin once said: “For my documentary photography I shoot in black and white because everyone knows the colour of blood,” and a statement has never been more true when capturing the grit and grace of a subject. Monotone creates an atmosphere and takes a subject back to its simplest form, not concentrating on colour but instead its shapes, textures and shades from light to dark with nothing too distracting in between. And with this genre there are the die-hard enthusiasts who like to lock themselves away developing film that they have fed with their very hands into a camera they have possessed for years, and those that prefer to adapt to the digital way of life manipulating what they see before their eyes in-camera or in the digital darkroom. As for the film lovers who take inspiration from the likes of Ansel Adams and Eve Arnold and those that have documented historic events such as both world wars, the erection of the Eiffel Tower or a kiss in New York’s Times Square, there’s a >> photographymonthly.com | 41
  30. 30. Black and white imagery by Karl Redshaw www.karlredshaw.com Swallet Falls, Peak District Canon 5D Mark III | 17-40mm f/4 | 40mm |13secs | f/20 | ISO 50 Baslow Edge, Peak District Canon 5D Mark III | 17-40mm f/4 | 40mm | 1/100sec | f/16 | ISO 400 Set up in 1893 by Alfred Harman 42 | more sentimental value to black and white. In an age when research shows that only 30 per cent of people actually print off their images and more and more new-age photography tagalongs shoot on their smartphones and upload straight to social networks, it’s time to take it slow and appreciate the pleasant past time of printing. Whether you’re shooting on HP5 film or Ilford Harman’s very own black and white disposable camera, the options are aplenty for those who want to dance with the dark arts. And behind many iconic black and white photographs that have been laid upon the pages of the history books and magazines, or hung on the walls of the most prestigious galleries, there has been one brand that has been called upon time and time again for its quality of paper and film supplies; Ilford Harman. With over 130 years in the business, surpassing the decline of film as the digital revolution waltzed in, and maintaining a presence by revolutionising the thinking behind their products for a new wave of photographers, Ilford Harman are the go-to guys for this genre – you’ve only got to look at the works of David Bailey, Jill Furmanovsky and Don McCullin to see why. But interestingly, the newcomers are overtaking the professionals when it comes to black and white photography with their student clientele dominating 80 per cent of sales. Now, we knew that analogue photography had become a somewhat show piece for hipsters who insist that they were born in the wrong decade, but au contraire, as London’s Central Saint Martins was the hub for renowned fashion designers Alexander McQueen and John Galliano in the 80s,
  31. 31. Black & White | Chesterton Mill Canon 5D Mark III | 17-40mm f/4 | 22mm | 1/5sec | f/22 | ISO 100 Curbar Edge Rock, Peak District Canon 5D Mark III | 17-40mm f/4 | 17mm | 1/80sec | f/11 | ISO 500 towards the end of the noughties it was the colleges that helped nurture students and a passion for film. “Students absolutely adore darkrooms, because a lot of young people don’t know about them and they find it exciting,” said Harman Technology Marketing Director Steven Brierley. “It’s photo education that is the big market for us, that’s what’s sustaining our business. The students learn about black and white photography on Ilford Harman materials and stay loyal to the brand. “Ten or twenty years ago our main sales would have generated from professional photographers and the press, but as digital technologies have replaced film because of the urgency for imagery nowadays, the clientele has changed.” But it has to be said that names such as Lomography and Holga were part of the attraction for younger photographers. “If you asked me five years ago if our 120 roll film would go up in sales because of some toy retro-styled camera, I would have said absolutely not. And yet here we are with this growth we never expected. The Holga or Lomo followers are seeing digital as everyday and see artisan photography as something appealing,” said Steve. Rewinding the clocks back to 1879, Ilford Harman started out making dry plates and was founded by one Alfred Harman who didn’t begin manufacturing their famous rolls of film until the century after in 1912. Proceeded by multigrade paper in 1940 their production line grew and grew and they were so indestructible that they survived through the Blitz. But of course the pressures of the press going to digital was the real black out for >> Its estimated turnover is £24 million photographymonthly.com | 43
  32. 32. William Henry Fox Talbot created stabilised photographic negatives on paper in 1835 Ilford and questioned their future in 2004, and held the company in a state of flux until June 2005. “The reason we ran into trouble was because our business was changing, the volumes of film and paper were reducing, and the company was engaged in a very aggressive strategy to grow a new inkjet business to replace the traditional black and white,” says Steven. “It was an awful time, I came into work on the Monday and the administrators had moved in. It wasn’t necessarily bankrupt, so by midday the six of us went to see the receiver who said they wanted to buy it from us and told them we wanted to save it. We felt the core black and white business had a future.” It was this faith in the product, innovative developments and loyal fan base who share the same passion for traditional photography that powered Ilford Harman through its darkest days. “If you’re in a real niche, which black and white is, you either totally embrace it or you might as well give up. People look to us to give them the confidence that they should carry on with their darkroom 44 | work and believe that we’re here for the future.” And while you’ve got the greats such as Norman Parkinson and Lord Snowdon amongst your alumni end users, there is still a demand for other legendary photographers who want something extra special, and that includes David Bailey who called upon the services of Ilford Harman to make an original style of paper that adapts to digital photography. “Bailey commissioned a fibre based digital black and white paper that a lightjet could print onto. The difference between what an inkjet printer and silver gelatine commands is three times the difference. So you could have all the winning combinations of silver gelatine fibre-based prints from a collectors’ point of view and marry it to an image that could have come from a negative or digital file. It wasn’t a difficult ask and it shot off to be a big success around the world.” We’re all familiar with sending off our holiday snaps to be printed by the high street chemist, but as printing becomes more valuable investing in Ilford Harman’s
  33. 33. Black and white imagery by Karl Redshaw www.karlredshaw.com Black & White | Next month In the upcoming issues of Photography Monthly we’ll be sharing with you some hints and tips of the craft – whether that’s with film or digital – and giving you inspiration along the way. So if you’re just starting out in black and white photography, would like to offer some tips and advice to your fellow readers or have something to really shout about, then get in touch for your chance to appear in the magazine. www.facebook.com/photographymonthly @photomonthly services within their village-sized premises in Cheshire is an attractive option because its quality cannot be emulated. “Collectors don’t want inkjet prints, they know that Ilford prints can stand the test of time because the business started in 1879 and we can prove it. There’s a guarantee that it’s going to be there in years to come, that’s why collectors spend thousands of pounds on an image.” You’ve only got to look at Edward Steichen’s landscape photograph The Pond from 1904 which sold for $2.9million in 2006 and Richard Avedon’s Dovima with Elephants from the 1950s which was auctioned for $1.15million in Paris in 2010, to know that collectable black and white photography is big money. With such a classic product, Ilford Harman is always on the lookout for new potentials in the photographic market, taking an age-old idea and bringing it to the mass market. From a Victorian-inspired pinhole camera to a retro black and white disposable camera, their heart lies in traditional methods but that doesn’t mean they’re not experts in the digital black and white field either. Releasing their Galerie Digital fibre-based 315gsm silver gelatine paper in partnership with Ilford Imaging in Switzerland, it’s designed to be exposed in laser printers which allows photographers to enjoy the aesthetic and archival properties of traditional darkroom prints which is ideal for digital black and white photographers. Able to explore the best of both worlds we photographers are spoilt for choice with the mediums we choose to indulge in to produce monotone imagery. Whether you remember the magic of creating your very first print in the darkroom or prefer being creative with in-camera filters that instantly let you see your masterpiece on screen, there’s an element of experimenting to black and white photography that no other genre can compare to. So continue with us on our journey in the upcoming issues of Photography Monthly magazine as we explore those that are pushing boundaries, new processes and practises that are coming to the forefront and be inspired by the plentiful and the passionate who share that connection for the dark arts. [PM] Harman Technology’s most popular products are the HP5 film and 8x10 pearl 4RC Multigrade paper photographymonthly.com | 45
  34. 34. B&W Interview | Ted Dwane A Show of Faces W At the launch of his very first photography exhibition, Mumford and Sons’ Ted Dwane tells Jessica Bracey why black and white photography is more than just a hobby ithin an hour of entering the realm of professional photography and opening his debut exhibition, Mumford and Sons’ Ted Dwane sold two prints showing that he is far more than a musician who just plays with a camera. Since exposing his adorning passion for film photography in Photography Monthly, the beardy bassist has been scurrying away plotting a unique project following the news that Mumford and Sons were taking a hiatus. “Now that we’ve taken some time off it’s nice to devote my creativity to photography which has had to take a back seat for the last four to five years,” he says. Announcing earlier this year that he was to host A Show of Faces showcasing his imagery shot on a Pentax 6 x 7in camera bought after a gig in Prague, and also his trusty Rolleiflex, the week long exhibition was released upon the public with a twist – they were the subject. Using 16 x 20in direct to positive paper from the black and white experts Ilford, the aim of Ted’s social photographic experiment was to create over 100 unique portraits in a live collaboration with Reuben Feels. Selecting random members of the public that stumbled past the London Newcastle building in Shoreditch, they’ve been given a set of questions to answer about themselves and their day surrounded by home comforts to get the sitter truly reaching within themselves before holding for an eight second exposure. With the whole process from questionnaire to portrait shoot, developing the prints in Ted’s on-site darkroom and hanging them on the wall taking half an hour, the whole space started with white walls and finished with floor to ceiling one-off portraits. >> photographymonthly.com | 47
  35. 35. Ted’s Photo P rocess >> - The subject is invited to have their photograph taken by Ted - Reubin Feels sits them down with tea and biscuits and asks them to fill out a questionnaire about themselves - The person is then sat before the camera - Ted composes them - He then goes inside the camera and focuses the image with the glass screen and lens - Covers the lens and replaces the glass with direct to positive paper - Exposes for eight seconds - Closes the shutter - Removes the paper and develops it for three minutes, puts it in stop for a minute, fixes it for three minutes and washes for however long needed - Dries and then hangs on the wall - Duration: 20 minutes 48 | “It’s amazing how this exhibition fell together. Some friends found a space, Walter Hugo lent me the Camera obscura, the concept developed and somehow we’ve arrived at the opening night. When we were on tour and people started asking about the exhibition date it seemed like a lifetime ago and I was frankly terrified,” he says. “The idea was kind of born out of the space because it’s so big. Just a succession of black and white images would not have been that interesting and we thought that we could do a lot more with it. We thought about developing negatives and making C-type prints, but knew that it would take a really long time. So then we went through this whole evolution of finding the quickest way to take a portrait and putting it on the wall, hopefully in the time that the sitter was still in the gallery. We started with the idea of using the 20 x 24in Polaroid which was simply just unattainable and the film is so expensive. I had done some test shots on the Camera obscura that Walter gave me and it cost a couple hundred of pounds to print and if that had been the Polaroid then it would have cost thousands. And actually, the longer exposure times which are about eight seconds with this camera produce really nice images. This direct to positive paper is amazing and I’m pleased that it’s nearer to the black and white process that I’m familiar with – Polaroid would have been a slight departure.” Borrowing the Camera obscura from a friend of a friend, Walter Hugo is a portrait photographer who has exhibited in the Paul Smith gallery and was recommended to Ted by Labrynth in Bethnal Green after requesting a camera with a difference. More of a room for a party of five than a camera, the wooden boxed enclosure holds the lens, darkroom chemicals and movable glass screen to focus and hold the direct to positive paper, and the technical process was a step closer to what Ted is accustomed to with his usual portrait work. “With analogue you’re creating one-off positive images of people, it’s just such a connected process and I understand how the chemistry works because it’s so simple. We are constantly distracted in our day to day lives and I’m so attracted to the process which requires so much of your devoted attention. With analogue and vinyl, you can actually see it working and therefore you can control it and be creative with it. I love it. There’s a theatrical element to this exhibition, a part of it is involving people in the process and maybe even getting them excited about the process,” he says about sharing his passion for black and white analogue photography. Alongside the live portrait shoot is the exhibition itself – a culmination of physical printed images taken during his time on the road as part of Mumford and Sons. An art he feels is dying out with the ease of digital photography, printing his work remains a special process to him but is another side of Ted that he is wary of showcasing. “I’ve always taken photos, and I’ve gotten to a point now where I’ve got such an accumulation of images that it does feel a bit weird just sitting on it, so it was time to do something with it. I think I’m nervous because it’s new territory and I haven’t shown much of my work before. It’s a whole new adventure and one that I’m really excited for, as it’s the opening night I’m going to be nervous but as soon as that’s over I can focus on getting the prints done. I think the solitude of the darkroom after the busy few years I’ve had will be quite nice, compared to any sort of performance where it’s a completely different side,” he says about finding sanctuary in photography. But it’s the people in front of the lens that gets him excited: “Quite a while ago I
  36. 36. B&W Interview | View from the Sitter: Patsy Youngstein “Having my picture taken by Ted was great, he was lovely and explained what he was going to do. I was told to look into the lens and think about something that meant a lot to me at that time. I actually thought about a landscape that I love. The interview part was strange because I suddenly felt like opening up and talking about myself more than I normally would, the beer might have had something to do with that, it was like being on a psychoanalyst couch. I don’t understand the technology behind the camera but I like the idea that it was a slow process, except that my eyes began to sting, but apart from that I thought it was very friendly and a very lovely feeling. I enjoyed it. Shooting analogue photography means a lot to me because I’m of the analogue age, and from what I’ve seen of Ted’s portraits what I find interesting is that the character of the people seems to come out more clearly compared to if they were in a more instant format.” photographymonthly.com | 49
  37. 37. Winston Marshall at 16th Street Station. 50 |
  38. 38. B&W Interview | realised that when I compose a shot, whether it’s in the >> countryside or a city, the image wouldn’t be complete unless there was some sort of human element, and that’s evolved to the point where I believe that there is nothing more interesting to look at than a face, there is just so much about it. The closeup lens with the Rolleiflex enables me to get really tight shots, and I love those because you can really see a person – you can’t just stare at someone in the street because it’s socially unacceptable, so to steal their face and hang it on the wall for people to then stare at and study, to me there’s nothing more interesting. I love the human element of taking a portrait, especially what we were trying to create in the exhibition, because you’re taking them off the street, sitting them down, giving them a cup of tea, talking about their day, and in those eight seconds when we’re creating the exposure all they’ve got to do it sit still and stare down the lens with music playing, and I hope that in that moment they’ll be thinking about themselves. During the trials that we have done you can just tell that there is nothing else there other than their thoughts, and there’s something really magical about that.” A camera junky who only the night before the exhibition bought a 10 x 12in wooden bellows camera from eBay, there will always be a fan-boy addiction to analogue photography for Ted. “The plan with that one is to shoot on direct to positive paper. eBay is so dangerous, but I’m pretty good now because I’ve realised that I’ve got everything that I need, but I’m sure that Photography Monthly’s readers can relate to the fun side of gear. I went through a real succession of discovering the TLR cameras and then SLRs with the big mirrors.” But his buying habits don’t just stop at gear, when in Chicago recently Ted saw himself close to purchasing a Vivian Maier original. “I’m sure a lot of people can relate to the allure of her work. I was looking through her most recent published self portraits, they’re just so amazing. Putting a price on photography is something I have struggled with a lot, because I’m not keen on selling work necessarily, but to do this exhibition alone was really expensive and I’d hope to sell some work purely to fund the next one.” Speaking of future exhibitions, Ted hopes to create a book from all the photographs he has printed from A Show of Faces and wants to take it further afield to create a world-wide showcase of faces, alongside getting back in the studio – in the musical sense. “I like the idea of all these strangers being united by this illumination; it’s sort of a metaphor for whatever you like, to get all those strangers assembled on a wall together. I definitely see it as on-going. Getting inside this camera and shooting direct to positives has been amazing and it’s been so much more than I hoped for and I just really want to go down that route and create some set-up shots. I’ve got some concepts brewing away now with some nice compositions that are beautifully lit portraits, but I want to make them before I really talk about them.” [PM] photographymonthly.com | 51
  39. 39. Canon 5D Mark II | 17-40mm f/4L | 21mm | 501secs | f/16 | ISO 50 | Lee Big Stopper, 0.9 ND grad and 0.6 ND grad filter MINIMAL MONO Revealing the tricks behind his stunning black and white landscape shot on a digital camera, multi-award winning East Anglian photographer Justin Minns is certainly an inspiration when it comes to this timeless genre “I’ve photographed this local lighthouse countless times, usually at sunrise but on this occasion I wanted to do a mono long exposure to smooth the water and capture the other-worldly appearance of the lighthouse; I find bright days with plenty of fluffy clouds are best for this. I composed the shot with the receding groynes leading the viewer out to the 52 | lighthouse and set up on a tripod with a Lee Big Stopper filter. An exposure time of around 120 seconds was enough to smooth the water but that wasn’t long enough to capture movement in the clouds. I tweaked the settings and added a further 0.9 ND filter to get the longest exposure time I could and settled down for a long wait!”
  40. 40. B&W Technique | What makes a particularly good subject matter for black and white photography for you? For this sort of black and white photography I look for a strong or unusually shaped subject that isn’t going to move during a long exposure, but with something else in the scene that will – water and clouds are the obvious choices but the fun is in coming up with new ideas. What made it the perfect shot this time round? I’ve been lucky enough to have caught some spectacular sunrises here in the past but this time all the elements – tide, weather and light – all came together to produce the drama I’d been looking for. Thinking about it, I haven’t been back since. What time of day is best to shoot this type of image? Although I regularly drag myself out of bed in the early hours to catch the best light, for shots like this I prefer a bright day with strong directional light so there’s plenty of contrast. Some big fluffy clouds and enough wind to blow them nicely across the sky is always welcome too. Why did you choose the settings that you did? I used a small aperture of f/16 and the lowest ISO I could to get the longest exposure possible. Around two minutes would have been enough to smooth the water but as the wind wasn’t particularly strong a longer exposure was needed to capture movement in the cloud. What should people take into consideration when shooting long exposures? The camera’s sensor gets hot during long exposures so noise can be a problem. If you use live view, remember to turn it off before pressing the shutter. Exposing to the right (making the exposure as bright as possible without clipping highlights) will also help, so keep a close eye on the histogram. What kit would you advise people who want to achieve something like this? You only need minimal gear. Any camera with bulb mode that you can attach filters to will suffice but preferably something with a large sensor like a DSLR or CSC. A sturdy tripod and shutter release cable are essentials along with a few filters – 10 stop and 3 stop ND filters and a 2 stop graduated ND filter. What advantages are there in using a Big Stopper Filter and ND Filter With a strong ND filter like the Big Stopper you can take long exposures even in full daylight. They reduce the shutter speed by ten stops so 1/30sec without the filter and 30 seconds with. Coupled with other ND filters exposure times in the minutes are possible even in bright sunlight. Would you recommend shooting black and white in camera or edit it in post production? Do both! If you shoot in Raw but set the camera’s picture style to monochrome you get the best of both worlds. The preview on the camera screen will appear in black and white giving instant feedback on how the shot looks in mono, helping you to think in black and white. Meanwhile the Raw file still contains all the colour information allowing you the control of doing the black and white conversion yourself in post production. What challenges did you face? Tripod sinkage... I needed to be close to the water to get the angle I wanted while avoiding the incoming tide to keep the tripod stable. Other than that, boredom! With exposures measured in minutes there’s a lot of standing around waiting. What advice would you offer other photographers looking to shoot something like this? Work methodically, compose your picture, focus and meter before adding any filters. Once you’re happy with everything then add your filters and work out the new exposure (if you have a smartphone you can download an app for that!) If you have any monotone shots that you would like to proudly show off, upload them to the black and white section in our online gallery. photographymonthly.com | 53
  41. 41. Message from the Editor ‘‘ We believe that photography is more than just taking pictures, it’s about the whole experience, hence our belief in the concept of ‘‘ take, make and share – don’t just keep your images locked away. It should also be a fun, inspirational and creative process, and that’s what we give you with PM. Adam Scorey, Group Editor, Photography Monthly Subscribe today! NT PRI PTION CRI UBS Neale James | S A cuppa with… Save £14.95 on the shop price of 5 issues! Every issue delivered direct to your door Neale James From Radio 1 presenter to professional wedding photographer, Jessica Bracey finds out about swapping sound for pictures with Neale James How did you first gain an interest in photography? I’m not sure that I always had an active interest, though from my teens I owned some SLRs like a Zenit, and I distinctly remember being leant a tripod by my uncle, that certainly made me feel like the real deal. My interest grew further during an arts programme I presented on BBC Radio Cambridgeshire where one of the regular guests was a regional newspaper photographer. I’m still in touch with him from time to time, odd to be on the same playing field professionally now. Was photography a big part of your life during your days at Radio 1? Unfortunately no; a great shame, particularly when I remember the people I met and things I saw. My father bought me a Nikon TW Zoom 105, which at the time was one of the top-line film compacts. That was in 1992, along with the words: “You see so much great stuff son, you should really record it.” I did take some pictures with it, but not enough. It still has a roll of film in. God knows what’s on it! The BBC did however give me a chance to learn a little more about photography and I certainly used that opportunity. How was the transition going from radio presenter to wedding photographer? It’s been a slow curve to be honest. For the first four or five years of the decade I turned professional I couldn’t quite believe I was doing what I did and not because I felt charmed, or somehow luckier than most, it was because I felt like some kind of visitor in the profession. I certainly worked hard at it, knuckled down and put the hours in, but there were plenty of days I didn’t feel half as comfortable as when sat in a studio with a pair of headphones waffling! But now I feel comfortable in my photographic shoes, still far more to achieve of course, but I’m no longer a visitor. What is it about wedding photography that you like the most? Wedding work was pretty much from the start a real injection of freedom. Apart from some set family portraiture, you really are your own boss and there’s a great emphasis on you having to know your onions. I like that. So it’s the freedom and frankly emotional exchange that drives me. I can’t think of another accessible genre that allows me to see so many differing levels of emotion on a day-to-day basis. You’ve shot some pretty high profile weddings such a Chris Tarrant’s daughter Fia, is there anyone else you would like to photograph? Radio presenters know me, well, some still do! That does bring me a reasonable amount of broadcaster weddings, though I turned down a wedding unwittingly for a broadcaster who inspired me to get into that industry in the first place. Boy did I kick myself hard! I’d certainly like to photograph more musicians. There’s something about a wedding when the people getting wed are creative; there’s often a higher sense of emotion to the day. Photographing higher profile weddings is an interesting part of my work. I don’t do a lot of it, but when I do I usually can’t raise the bragging flag. Celebs are a private type of client. Who has been an inspiration to your work? From weddings then, without a doubt Jeff Ascough is an important figure for me. His work has a high level of maturity and reason – and that’s something that is misunderstood and misrepresented in our business. From America, Joe Buissink. I love his story; a man who at 45 changed his life on the back, pretty much, of one photograph, an image that persuaded him that story telling could and would be a valid proposition. His work is excellent and I can really engage with the emotion he shows. Do you have a favourite image by another photographer? Too many! Some would certainly belong to the photographers above. Of late though it’s a landscape picture taken, developed and printed by a good friend of mine, an ex army news photographer called Giles Penfound, that my wife gave to my brother-in-law as a present! I saw it the other day, propped up in his lounge, still not hung. If I see it like that again I’m nicking it back! There’s a depth to that photograph that captivates me. Is there a photograph of yours which is a favourite? They fluctuate year to year to be fair. But probably the most important photograph I have taken in terms of presenting to prospective clients and being recognised for, is the daughter cradling her mother’s face in her outstretched hand. I have a massive print of that picture to the right of where I sit in my office, and it reminds me that this is what I seek every time I go to a wedding; honest, real, almost tunnel vision moments. The mother was congratulating her daughter following the ceremony, though there is an undertone of the absence of the bride’s father and I think the whole thing shows in the exchange. It’s not a perfect photograph, there’s a jaunty angle which troubles me slightly. I can say with all genuine honesty that this photograph affects some people in quite clear ways. I was exhibiting at a London wedding fayre and one chap couldn’t stop crying every time he saw that picture. They booked there and then. What’s the best piece of advice you have been given? The most influential advice given in my life would certainly have been my late father, who showed me that belief is so much more powerful than initial skill. I hear my early radio shows and wince at what I sounded like. I see my early photographs and wonder what on earth I was even looking at when taking the photograph. But somehow my father’s philosophy has carried me through both my careers and I certainly wouldn’t be doing what can do now, if it weren’t for him. He’s hugely missed. [PM] www.nealejames.com | 12 photographymonthly.com | 13 B&W Technique | Canon 5D Mark II | 17-40mm f/4L | 21mm | 501secs | f/16 | ISO 50 | Lee Big Stopper, 0.9 ND grad and 0.6 ND grad filter MINIMAL MONO L ITA N DIG IPTIO SCR SUB What makes a particularly good subject matter for black and white photography for you? For this sort of black and white photography I look for a strong or unusually shaped subject that isn’t going to move during a long exposure, but with something else in the scene that will – water and clouds are the obvious choices but the fun is in coming up with new ideas. What made it the perfect shot this time round? I’ve been lucky enough to have caught some spectacular sunrises here in the past but this time all the elements – tide, weather and light – all came together to produce the drama I’d been looking for. Thinking about it, I haven’t been back since. Revealing the tricks behind his stunning black and white landscape shot on a digital camera, multi-award winning East Anglian photographer Justin Minns is certainly an inspiration when it comes to this timeless genre What time of day is best to shoot this type of image? Although I regularly drag myself out of bed in the early hours to catch the best light, for shots like this I prefer a bright day with strong directional light so there’s plenty of contrast. Some big fluffy clouds and enough wind to blow them nicely across the sky is always welcome too. Why did you choose the settings that you did? I used a small aperture of f/16 and the lowest ISO I could to get the longest exposure possible. Around two minutes would have been enough to smooth the water but as the wind wasn’t particularly strong a longer exposure was needed to capture movement in the cloud. Access online or through our dedicated apps Full access to the fully searchable magazine archive Download for offline reading to enjoy anytime What should people take into consideration when shooting long exposures? The camera’s sensor gets hot during long exposures so noise can be a problem. If you use live view, remember to turn it off before pressing the shutter. Exposing to the right (making the exposure as bright as possible without clipping highlights) will also help, so keep a close eye on the histogram. What kit would you advise people who want to achieve something like this? You only need minimal gear. Any camera with bulb mode that you can attach filters to will suffice but preferably something with a large sensor like a DSLR or CSC. A sturdy tripod and shutter release cable are essentials along with a few filters – 10 stop and 3 stop ND filters and a 2 stop graduated ND filter. What advantages are there in using a Big Stopper Filter and ND Filter With a strong ND filter like the Big Stopper you can take long exposures even in full daylight. They reduce the shutter speed by ten stops so 1/30sec without the filter and 30 seconds with. Coupled with other ND filters exposure times in the minutes are possible even in bright sunlight. Would you recommend shooting black and white in camera or edit it in post production? Do both! If you shoot in Raw but set the camera’s picture style to monochrome you get the best of both worlds. The preview on the camera screen will appear in black and white giving instant feedback on how the shot looks in mono, helping you to think in black and white. Meanwhile the Raw file still contains all the colour information allowing you the control of doing the black and white conversion yourself in post production. What challenges did you face? Tripod sinkage... I needed to be close to the water to get the angle I wanted while avoiding the incoming tide to keep the tripod stable. Other than that, boredom! With exposures measured in minutes there’s a lot of standing around waiting. What advice would you offer other photographers looking to shoot something like this? Work methodically, compose your picture, focus and meter before adding any filters. Once you’re happy with everything then add your filters and work out the new exposure (if you have a smartphone you can download an app for that!) “I’ve photographed this local lighthouse countless times, usually at sunrise but on this occasion I wanted to do a mono long exposure to smooth the water and capture the other-worldly appearance of the lighthouse; I find bright days with plenty of fluffy clouds are best for this. I composed the shot with the receding groynes leading the viewer out to the lighthouse and set up on a tripod with a Lee Big Stopper filter. An exposure time of around 120 seconds was enough to smooth the water but that wasn’t long enough to capture movement in the clouds. I tweaked the settings and added a further 0.9 ND filter to get the longest exposure time I could and settled down for a long wait!” If you have any monotone shots that you would like to proudly show off, upload them to the black and white section in our online gallery. | 52 photographymonthly.com | 53 Winter Portraits | Cool tones Andrea Denniss from Pink Lily Photography, and trainer at Aspire Photography Training, tells Boo Marshall why she welcomes the cold season in her portrait shoot J ust a quick look at some of Andrea’s beautiful images makes you yearn to pick up your camera and capture a similar result, so when she said she was very happy to pass some tips onto the readers of Photography Monthly, I grabbed my pen very quickly so I too could learn. As soon as the clocks went back, you could hear the photography collective moan across the country, as it signalled the arrival of the cold, but Andrea thinks with her photographical mind and tells me that: “Every season has wonderful opportunities to create beautiful images. Winter is no exception.” For her, it starts with the vibrant colours of autumn and then she watches as the snow, mist and cool, crisp winter sun take their place. “As the first snowdrops make their appearance, I know that my winter portrait opportunities are ending, so I do all I can to get as much done in the cold season as possible. I truly believe there is no better time to take your camera outside to create unique portraits that capture the beauty of winter.” Andrea began her professional portrait life working from within a studio but soon realised that by venturing out beyond the walls of her studio she could be so much more creative.” Being outside, Andrea – in common with other lifestyle photographers – found that her clients were happier and therefore more relaxed. “That made it possible for me to capture the essence of the people I photographed, and to take advantage of the seasons and landscapes that surrounded them. Each season has its challenges, but it’s important to overcome them so you can portray the unique beauty each one brings.” Putting her passion into practise here are Andrea’s tips for creating perfect winter portraiture. Location, Location, Location “You need to have the right location for your shoot,” Andrea stresses, “If a person loves a particular place, then that is exactly where we will go. This could be somewhere they just enjoy being, or somewhere that they relate good memories to. If your subject is emotionally attached to the place where you’re doing the shoot, they will be more likely to connect with the images that you create.” Andrea always takes her subjects on a walk when they get to the shoot location. “In my head, I am setting up shots and situations as we walk. It keeps me thinking and I am continually inspired by observing the changing environment and by watching them in that situation. By doing this, I can then create a selection of images in a number of different places aimed at putting together an album that tells the story of their shoot.” Andrea always has back-up locations though. “I find these through location hunting trips and from experience with past shoots.” She also suggests that throughout the year you should spend some time visiting different places, with the possibility of a future shoot in mind, so that you build up your own collection of locations. “It’s worth visiting these locations at different times of the year as they will look very different in camera.” /photographymonthly @photomonthly Light is King Photographers will repeatedly say that an understanding of light is key to taking good photographs, and the same rule holds true for winter portraits, and Andrea is no exception and recognises that: “The one thing that has made the biggest difference to my photography is understanding natural light and how to work with it. “The light is very different in all the seasons and winter light has to be my favourite.” While a high summer sun can create harsh contrasts, the cool and gentle qualities of winter light in particular can be incredibly atmospheric especially when added to the frequent mist and fog we get at this time of year. “In fact,” Andrea muses, “one of my favourite shots was done on a cold and foggy winter’s day.” Andrea suggests: “It’s important to remember that the light in winter does fade quickly in the afternoon. I always plan my winter shoots in the morning to ensure I get the best light available.” Preferring to shoot into the light, a signature trademark of her beautiful images, she believes the light at this time of the year with the sun much lower in the sky is perfect. Don’t forget, that you are more likely to have nature’s own diffusers in place during the winter! “Clouds are the perfect diffuser of light,” she says, “and the winter light can create shadows which are beautifully long.” >> 68 | photographymonthly.com | 69 T&Cs: UK only offer. Savings are based on the cover price of a subscription by Direct Debit. After your first 5 issues your subscription will continue at a 35% saving by 6 monthly Direct Debit. Offer ends: 31/05/2014 54 |
  42. 42. Subscription offer 5FOR £5 ISSUES Subscribe to Photography Monthly and enjoy savings of up to 75% Instant digital access Direct to your door 5 issues for £5 by Direct Debit* EASY WAYS TO ORDER: www.subscriptionsave.co.uk/PM 0844 848 4211 and quote code CMMPG01S Lines are open 8am-9.30pm Mon-Fri, 8am-4pm Saturdays. BT calls to 0844 cost no more than 5p/minute, calls from mobiles usually cost more. For overseas subscriptions please call +44(0) 1858438840. Offer ends 31/05/14. photographymonthly.com | 55
  43. 43. Camera Travels | Training Day Exploring some personal journeys across the land through all manor of transportation, Will Roberts takes a day trip on the North Yorkshire Moors to see the sights from a steam train Newcastle Upon Tyne Middlesbrough Whitby Scarborough Pickering Leeds Hull Scunthorpe Whitby Scarborough Pickering photographymonthly.com | 57
  44. 44. I ’d take a train journey over a trip in a car, a bus or a motorbike any day of the week. Cars require roads, and wherever there are roads, people inevitably build around them. I love the way train lines silently and smoothly slice through our landscape, taking in unseen parts of the countryside, sneaking into cities through the back door. But putting the rose-tinted spectacles to one side, it’s sometimes hard to enjoy the trains here in Britain – especially if they form part of the hustle of a daily commute. Too often they are late, overcrowded or both. But a heritage rail route is a different story – far from the preserve of train spotters and history buffs, it’s a great way to see, and photograph, new countryside and towns. With these trains, the journey is just as important as the destination, which is the way it should be. So I’m excited to head to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, a line which takes in wide, expansive moorland, quaint villages untouched by time and a bustling seaside town, where the North Sea meets stunning coastline. The Route The NYMR runs from Pickering to Whitby, passing across barren moorland to a number of attractive villages along the way. Whitby is far from an undiscovered photographic gem – its beauty has been recorded by photographers for hundreds of years, stretching back to Frank Sutcliffe’s brilliant work at the end of the 19th century. It’s undoubtedly photogenic, the sea combining with steep, winding streets, a busy harbour, a wide beach and, of course, the famous abbey and church on top of the cliffs. For most of the year, the NYMR runs three return services a day between Pickering and Whitby, with another two services a day planned for later in 2014. But on the day of my journey, owing to the time of year, the trains are only running a section of the line. I’m keen to photograph Whitby though, so I set my alarm clock and get to Whitby just after sunrise, a few hours before my train leaves later in the day from nearby Grosmont. Whitby As is so often the case with photography, my early start is richly rewarded. I’ve been to Whitby many times before and I adore it – who wouldn’t? Judging by the hoards of visitors who swarm in at the weekend, I’m not the only one with a soft spot for this coastal gem. But while crowded streets and busy beaches are great for observational, candid photography, they are not perhaps so great for decent landscapes. But Whitby at 8am is a gloriously quiet place – even the harbour seems deserted. I have the entire pier to myself, with only the seagulls to keep me company. I’m alone as I climb the 199 steps to the abbey and the church – home of perhaps the most wind-blasted graveyard in the country, but boy do those headstones have a view to die for. Just after 9am, the clouds are replaced by blue, mottled sky that will remain for much of the remainder of the day. I pick up some kippers from Fortune’s smokehouse at the foot of the 199 steps and as I head for the car, the crowds begin to arrive, moving into the streets, braving the biting wind at the end of the pier. Call me anti-social, but I’m glad I already have my shots. >> 58 |
  45. 45. Camera Travels | Nikon D7000 | 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 | 26mm | 1/100sec | f/4 | ISO 280 The North Yorkshire Moors Railway – Essential Information • The line first opened in 1836 as the Whitby and Pickering Railway • The great train pioneer George Stephenson thought the line would open up important trade routes between the port of Whitby and in-land towns and cities • The line shut in 1965 but was reopened eight years later as a heritage railway • There are six stations along the 18 miles of line between Pickering and Whitby • There are three daily return services between Pickering and Whitby, but this is set to increase to five later in the year • A Day Rover ticket costs £24, with discounts for children, pensioners and concessions • For more information visit www.nymr.co.uk or call 01751 472508 photographymonthly.com | 59
  46. 46. Nikon D7000 | 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6 | 18mm | 1/400sec | f/3.5 | ISO 280 Tips on a Train • Consider which side of the train is better to shoot from, both in terms of scenery, but also in terms of light. Quite often train lines are built into the hillside – you certainly don’t want to be glaring at a grassy bank for the whole journey. If it’s possible to change to a different side of the train, do so. If you aren’t sure which side is best, ask locals or train staff, or use Google Maps to plan the journey. • Shooting from a moving train requires a fast shutter speed to freeze the contents of your frame, but it is also worth experimenting with movement. Try a slower shutter speed to blur landscapes and capture that feeling of movement in an abstract way. • If the windows do open, take extra care when sticking a camera lens, or your head out of them. Check with train staff if you are unsure whether it is safe to do so. • Many older trains and stations are packed full of character. These small elements are what makes a train journey such as this different from a commuter train. Make sure you capture these elements. • If the train stops, and passengers are allowed to get off, take the opportunity to get off and get some external shots of the train, the platform and the station. It’s a vital part of the journey. • Make sure you move around the train, rather than simply staying in your seat. Who knows who, or what, you’ll see. • Look ahead to make sure you can see what is coming up, that way you’ll be ready to take a shot when it’s nearer. 60 |
  47. 47. Camera Travels | All Aboard I head to Grosmont, where my train leaves towards Pickering. I’m doing a return journey, with a short stop in Pickering – a great chance to get off and take some more pictures. I’ve never taken photographs from a train before. Not ‘proper’ photographs anyway. I’m relieved when I find the traditional-style train carriages have windows, which slide open to allow you to poke your camera out, meaning you don’t have to settle for through the window shots, which rarely turn out successfully. Popping my Nikon D7000 out of the window also allows a much wider field of vision and while it’s generally okay to put your camera out of the window, it’s downright dangerous to lean out too far to get a shot. This is where using the LCD screen, instead of the viewfinder to frame your shot is useful – if your camera has that function. I’m also lucky enough to have access to windows at both sides of the train, so I hop from one side of the carriage to the other depending on what I can see. Opening the windows also improves the audio experience of the journey too, amplifying the rhythmic chug of the engine, punctuated only by the occasional screech of the whistle or squawk of pheasants as they flee from the on coming train. Light and Dark I’m blessed with a glorious winter’s day for my train journey. The early morning clouds which lingered above Whitby earlier on have all but gone, allowing for clear blue skies and crisp, bright sunlight. This type of sunshine however, is a double-edged sword. It brings light and dark, problems and reward. As we head south towards Pickering, I’m invariably shooting straight into the sun, which is low in the sky. As the train passes through valleys rust stained by autumn, I’m faced with great patches of deep shadow together with bright areas bathed in sunlight, which causes exposure problems. But the sun also brings with it good aspects. At this time of year the shadows on small details are long and slender, making tiny rivets protrude more than usual. Meanwhile the steam pouring out of the locomotive is shimmering white in the light. This is especially noticeable when the stops at Pickering and the light streams through the station, illuminating the steam quite brilliantly. Challenges It’s certainly an intriguing challenge to try and capture decent landscapes from a train. It is a test both from a technical and an artistic point of view. Even at the modest speed of the train, landscapes come and go in an instant. While time is a consideration in all landscape photography, when you are chugging along at 30mph, that perfect shot doesn’t hang around for long. Speed also plays its part in the settings on the camera – I have to bump up the ISO to freeze the action. But I also enjoy playing around with longer exposures, allowing some blur to capture that feeling of speed. I also find it difficult to capture any foreground interest in my pictures. A square-on shot of fence, field and forest seems to lack something, so I often find myself waiting until the train goes around a bend, then snapping a shot of the carriages, the locomotion and some scenery. >> photographymonthly.com | 61
  48. 48. Stretch the Legs The NYMR route is blessed with dozens of landmarks to add interest to my pictures, not least the stations along the way, which are wonderfully maintained and effortlessly photogenic. To make the most of them, it’s best to buy a Day Rover ticket, which will allow passengers to hop on and off the trains all day. This means you can wander around beautiful stations such as Goathland, giving yourself time to take a variety of landscape shots. But I find myself drawn to the detail shots too – those close ups of signs, machinery and rusting carriages – all of which play a big part in the story of the railway line. There is also a ‘rail trail’ between Grosmont and Goathland stations, allowing passengers to stretch their legs and walk some of the way – another great chance to get some varying shots. Fans of the television series Heartbeat – I admit I’m not one of them – may recognise Goathland as the setting for the fictional village of Aidensfield. It also starred as Hogsmeade Station in the Harry Potter films. Dirt Soon after hopping aboard my train I realise one problem, I would need to keep on top of those pesky particles on my lens throughout the day. On the outward journey, I sat towards the rear of the train and discover the occasional speck on my lens. But on the return, when I was positioned directly behind the steam engine, I really noticed it. Coal dust, ash and water droplets all landed on my lens, and occasionally in my eye. I kept wiping the lens with a cloth, but sometimes specks still creep into pictures, meaning a little retouching when back at the desktop and on the computer. Final Shots The return trip from Pickering is a cloudy affair, but I enjoy being behind the engine – I get a better feeling of the sheer power of the machine and enjoy snapping shots of the train drivers as they poke their heads out. Back at Grosmont Station, I have a brief opportunity to take some more photos of the station as the winter light leaks out of the day. As I drive home in the car, already looking forward to the Whitby kippers I’ll be enjoying later, I find myself following the route of the railway back down towards Pickering. It’s a great chance to hop out of the car and look from a different angle, this time trackside, as the line and the road meet at a crossing, the sunset peaking where the tracks meet the horizon. The trip has certainly been a worthwhile one photographically, but perhaps more importantly, I’ve enjoyed the journey, which can easily occupy a day or even a weekend. As the final stop, Whitby is a reward for any fan of landscape photography, and I even found that the journey is just as special too. [PM] 62 |
  49. 49. Camera Travels | Nikon D7000 | 10-20mm f/4-5.6 | 11mm | 1/125sec | f/5 | ISO 220 63 | photographymonthly.com
  50. 50. COURSES AVAILABLE FOR 2014 LAKE DISTRICT LANGDALES/ DERWENTWATER NOV 2013 FLAMBOROUGH THORNWICK BAY JAN 2014 YORKSHIRE DALES/ LITTONDALE JAN 2014 LAKE DISTRICT LANGDALES/ DERWENTWATER JAN 2014 ROBIN HOODS BAY FEB 2014 KIRKSTALL ABBEY PHOTOGRAPHY MARCH 2014 YORKSHIRE DALES SWALEDALE PHOTOGRAPHY APRIL 2014 WHITBY JUNE & JULY 2014 INSPIRATIONAL LANDSCAPE YORKSHIRE DALES/ INGLEBOROUGH  RIBBLEHEAD NOV 2013 SALTWICK BAY JUNE 2014 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS, FROM THE YORKSHIRE DALES, MOORS & COAST. Whether an advanced amateur looking to learn new locations and overcome a photographic stumbling block, or a complete beginner getting to grips with the basics of landscape photography, there is no better, or more inspirational classroom to learn in, than the Dales and coastline of Yorkshire. Be part of a small group or bespoke one-to-one workshops. Tel: 07536 068699 www.davidspeightphotography.co.uk The White Horse farm Inn is a 16th Century country inn set on a hillside with panoramic views over the village of Rosedale Abbey, surrounded by the North Yorkshire Moors. The bar and restaurant are full of old world charm and character featuring a roaring log fire. The bar offers a wide selection of traditional hand-pulled ales, fine wines and malt whiskeys. Traditional Yorkshire fayre is served daily, both in the cosy bar and the stylish restaurant, where the extensive menu specialises in local game, fish and organic meats. All meals are cooked to order using only the finest ingredients. Located in the heart of the North Yorkshire Moors, a trip to historic York will take an hour by car and Yorkshire’s Heritage Coast is a mere 19 miles away. The White Horse Farm Inn guarantees you a warm welcome, a great atmosphere and excellent value. Tel: 01751 417239 Email: whitehorsefarmrosedale@msn.com www.whitehorserosedale.co.uk Rosedale Abbey, North Yorkshire YO18 8SE
  51. 51. Buyers’ Guide | An explorer’s kit If you’re thinking about making your own Camera Travels t’north then you might want to consider packing some of these items Garmin’s Dakota 10 This handheld navigation system could well save your bacon if you happen to lose your way in the rugged northern countryside. Boasting touchscreen navigation, satellite prediction and highsensitivity GPS with a worldwide basemap you can put full faith in this pocket-size creation. It’s also reassuring to know that the Dakota 10 will even maintain pin-point tracking in heavy cover and deep valleys. £130 www.garmin.com MacWet Long Climatec Sports Gloves Tried and tested by the PM team, these gloves are great for keeping your digits toasty while you operate your camera in the great outdoors. The long cuff allows for reduced heat leak and their specialised Climatec fabric means you get 100 per cent grip even in the wettest weather. The gloves are also lined with warm fleece for the nippier days and each pair is measured to fit, ensuring that there’s no end fold on the fingers when you’re trying to use your camera and movement is comfortable and clean. £30 www.macwet.com ViewRanger Outdoors GPS & Maps If it’s all about the age of the mobile phone for you, then why not grab this free app for your phone and have all your maps on one device and on the go? This app can provide GPS locations even in areas without signal and can work offline via its Create Saved Map mode, so you don’t need to worry if you stumble into a particularly rural area of the north! You can also use track recording to share your journey with friends via Flickr with added photos. It also features a power save mode so you need not worry about the horror movie style battery black out in the wilderness. FREE www.viewranger.com Kenro teleconverter lens M58S200 Perfect for lessening the weight of your rucksack while you explore, the Kenro teleconverter lens simply attaches onto the camera’s existing built-in lens and enhances it to telephoto capabilities to 58mm. It can be used with any digital compact and can be attached using an appropriate adaptor. With this lens you can capture the beauty of the north and any wildlife you find within it! Bonus. £84.90 www.kenro.co.uk Thule Gauntlet smartphone cases With a wide range of protective smartphone cases, covering iPhones to Samsung Galaxy models, you can venture out in confidence knowing that your link to the rest of the world is safe and sound. Thule smartphone cases are slim, gripable and easily snap onto your phone to safeguard it from bumps and scratches. £20 approx. www.thule.com photographymonthly.com | 65
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