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11H Theory of Everything

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I\'ve been playing with "Hs." First it was 3Hs. Then 7Hs. Then 6, 5, etc. Here I want to share the Grand Finale. (For now.) That is, "The 11H Theory of Everything," a 368-slide ...

I\'ve been playing with "Hs." First it was 3Hs. Then 7Hs. Then 6, 5, etc. Here I want to share the Grand Finale. (For now.) That is, "The 11H Theory of Everything," a 368-slide show. Incidentally, I\'ve included the original "3H Theory of Everything" as an Appendix.

Enjoy!
Tom Peters posted this yesterday.

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  • I am an unabashed Michael Schrage fan. I admit it. AND HIS … UNABASHED … OBSESSION … WITH PROTOTYPING MATCHES MINE! In short: It ain’t real ’til we’ve done something … REAL. Good news [per Schrage and me]: You CAN do “something real” in short order … if your head is screwed on right.
  • Call this … The Big DUH . You can’t get turned on by something … until … there is … SOMETHING TO GET TURNED ON BY. In Schrage-speak, the Reaction To The Prototype … IS THE INNOVATION. Tom-speak: YOU AIN’T DONE NOTHIN’ ’TIL YOU’VE DONE … SOMETHIN’!
  • Pick one!

11H Theory of Everything 11H Theory of Everything Presentation Transcript

  • NOTE : To appreciate this presentation [and insure that it is not a mess ], you need Microsoft fonts: “Showcard Gothic,” “Ravie,” “Chiller” and “Verdana”
  • Excellence: The 11H * “ Theory of Everything” 15 November 2010/Tom Peters *Also see original 3H “Theory of Everything” at APPENDIX, end of this presentation
  • Excellence: The Moral Basis of Enterprise
  • “ At a party …
  • “ At a party given by a billionaire on Shelter Island, Kurt Vonnegut informs his pal, Joseph Heller, that their host, a hedge fund manager, had made more money in a single day than Heller had earned from his wildly popular novel Catch-22 over its whole history. Heller responds …
  • “ At a party given by a billionaire on Shelter Island, Kurt Vonnegut informs his pal, Joseph Heller … that their host, a hedge fund manager, had made more money in a single day than Heller had earned from his wildly popular novel Catch-22 over its whole history. Heller responds … ‘Yes, but I have something he will never have … enough.’” Source: John Bogle, Enough. The Measures of Money, Business, and Life (Bogle is founder of the Vanguard Mutual Fund Group)
  • “ Too Much Cost, Not Enough Value” “ Too Much Speculation, Not Enough Investment” “ Too Much Complexity, Not Enough Simplicity” “ Too Much Counting, Not Enough Trust” “ Too Much Business Conduct, Not Enough Professional Conduct” “ Too Much Salesmanship, Not Enough Stewardship” “ Too Much Focus on Things, Not Enough Focus on Commitment” “ Too Many Twenty-first Century Values, Not Enough Eighteenth-Century Values” “ Too Much ‘Success,’ Not Enough Character” Source: Jack Bogle, Enough. (chapter titles)
  • “ Managers have lost dignity over the past decade in the face of wide spread institutional breakdown of trust and self-policing in business. To regain society’s trust, we believe that business leaders must embrace a way of looking at their role that goes beyond their responsibility to the shareholders to include a civic and personal commitment to their duty as institutional custodians. In other words, it is time that management became a profession.” —Rakesh Khurana & Nitin Nohria, “It’s Time To Make Management a True Profession,” HBR/10.08
  • Organizations exist to serve . Period. Leaders live to serve . Period.
  • EXCELLENCE. Always. If not EXCELLENCE, what? If not EXCELLENCE now, when? EXCELLENCE is not an "aspiration." EXCELLENCE is not a "journey." EXCELLENCE is the next five minutes. Organizations exist to SERVE. Period. Leaders exist to SERVE. Period. SERVICE is a beautiful word. SERVICE is character, community, commitment. (And profit.) SERVICE is a beautiful word. SERVICE is not "Wow." SERVICE is not "raving fans." SERVICE is not "a great experience." Service is "just" that— SERVICE .
  • Why in the World did you go to Siberia ?
  • Enterprise * ** (*at its best): An emotional , vital , innovative , jo y ful , creative , entre p reneurial endeavor that elicits maximum concerted human potential in the wholehearted service of others .** **Employees, Customers, Suppliers, Communities, Owners, Temporary partners
  • “ Excellence … can be obtained if you: ... care more than others think is wise; ... risk more than others think is safe; ... dream more than others think is practical; ... expect more than others think is possible.” Source: Anon. (Posted @ tompeters.com by K.Sriram, November 27, 2006 1:17 AM)
  • Two things Before we begin …
  • #1
  • If the regimental commander lost most of his 2nd lieutenants and 1st lieutenants and captains and majors, it would be a tragedy. If he lost his ser g eants it would be a catastro p he . The Army and the Navy are fully aware that success on the battlefield is dependent to an extraordinary degree on its Sergeants and Chief Petty Officers. Does industry have the same awareness?
  • #1 cause of employee Dis-satisfaction?
  • Employee retention & satisfaction: Overwhelmin g l y based on the first-line mana g er! Source: Marcus Buckingham & Curt Coffman, First, Break All the Rules: What the World’s Greatest Managers Do Differently
  • I am sure you “spend time” on this. My question: Is it an … OBSESSION …worthy of the impact it has on enterprise performance?
  • Suggested addition to your statement of Core Competencies: “We are obsessed with developing a cadre of 1st line managers that is second to none—we understand that this cadre per se is arguably one of our top two or three most important ‘Strategic Assets.’”
  • Six “Obvious” Questions (1) Are you, Big Boss, a ... f-o-r-m-a-l student of first-line supervisor behavioral excellence?* (*Yes, this sort of thing can be formally studied.) (2) Do you spend ... gobs and gobs (and then more and more gobs and gobs) of time ... selecting the first-line supervisors? (3) Do you have the ... absolute best training program in the industry ... (or some subset thereof) for first-line supervisors? (4) Do you Formally & Rigorously ... mentor ... first-line supervisors? (5) Are you willing, pain notwithstanding, to ... leave a first-line supervisor slot open ... until you can fill the slot with somebody spectacular? (And are you willing to use some word like ... “spectacular” ... in judging applicants for the job?) (6) Is it possible that promotion decisions for first-line supervisors are more important than promotion decisions for VP slots?) (Hint: Yes .)
  • Capital Asset **Selecting and training and mentoring one’s pool of front- line managers can be a “Core Competence” of surpassing strategic importance. **Put under a microscope every attribute of the cradle-to- grave process of building the capability of our cadre of front-line managers.
  • #2
  • Problem #1. Opportunity #1.
  • XFX = #1 * *Cross-Functional eXcellence
  • Never waste a lunch!
  • ???? % XF lunches* *Measure! Monthly! Part of evaluation! [The PA’s Club.]
  • Lunch > SAP/ Oracle
  • “ Allied commands depend on mutual confidence [and this confidence is] gained, above all through the develo p ment of friendshi p s .” — General D.D. Eisenhower, Armchair General* (05.08) *“Perhaps his most outstanding ability [at West Point] was the ease with which he made friends and earned the trust of fellow cadets who came from widely varied backgrounds; it was a quality that would pay great dividends during his future coalition command.”
  • (Way) Underutilized Lever Space! Space! Space! Space!
  • Geologists + Geophysicists + A little bit of love = Oil
  • “ XFX Social Accelerators.” 1. EVERYONE’s [more or less] JOB #1: Make friends in other functions! (Purposefully. Consistently. Measurably.) 2. “Do lunch” with people in other functions!! Frequently!! (Minimum 10% to 25% for everyone? Measured.) 3. Ask peers in other functions for references so you can become conversant in their world. (It’s one helluva sign of ... GIVE-A-DAMN-ism.) 4. Invite counterparts in other functions to your team meetings. Religiously. Ask them to present “cool stuff” from “their world” to your group. (B-I-G deal; useful and respectful.) 5. PROACTIVELY SEEK EXAMPLES OF “TINY” ACTS OF “XFX” TO ACKNOWLEDGE—PRIVATELY AND PUBLICALLY. (Bosses: ONCE A DAY … make a short call or visit or send an email of “Thanks” for some sort of XFX gesture by your folks and some other function’s folks.) 6. Present counterparts in other functions awards for service to your group. Tiny awards at least weekly; and an “Annual All-Star Supporters [from other groups] Banquet” modeled after superstar salesperson banquets. 7. Discuss—A SEPARATE AGENDA ITEM—good and problematic acts of cross-functional co-operation at every Team Meeting.
  • “ XFX Social Accelerators.” 8. When someone in another function asks for assistance, respond with … more … alacrity than you would if it were the person in the cubicle next to yours—or even more than you would for a key external customer. (Remember, XFX is the key to Customer Retention which is in turn the key to “all good things.”) 9. Do not bad mouth ... “the damned accountants,” “the bloody HR guy.” Ever. (Bosses: Severe penalties for this—including public tongue-lashings.) 10. Get physical!! “Co-location” may well be the most powerful “culture change lever.” Physical X-functional proximity is almost a … guarantee … of remarkably improved co-operation—to aid this one needs flexible workspaces that can be mobilized for a team in a flash. 11. Formal evaluations. Everyone, starting with the receptionist, should have a significant XF rating component in their evaluation. (The “XFX Performance” should be among the Top 3 items in all managers’ evaluations.) 12. Demand XF experience for, especially, senior jobs. For example, the U.S. military requires all would-be generals and admirals to have served a full tour in a job whose only goals were cross-functional achievements. 13. XFX is … PERSONAL … as well as about organizational effectiveness. PXFX [Personal XFX] is arguably the #1 Accelerant to personal success—in terms of organizational career, freelancer/Brand You, or as entrepreneur.
  • C(I) > C(E)
  • C(I) > C(E) Lunch Kudos Learning/ Presence/Presentations Facetime C(E) Transparency Awards Co-locate/Geologists-Geophysicists Time!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Motherhood (“If don’t take credit …) Staff C.Sat./Unicredit
  • THE WHOLE POINT HERE IS THAT “XFX” IS ALMOST CERTAINALY THE #1 OPPORTUNITY FOR STRATEGIC DIFFERENTIATION. WHILE MANY WOULD LIKELY AGREE, IN OUR MOMENT-TO-MOMENT AFFAIRS, XFX PER SE IS NOT SO OFTEN VISIBLY & PERPETUALLY AT THE TOP OF EVERY AGENDA. I ARGUE HERE FOR NO LESS THAN … VISIBLE. CONSTANT. OBSESSION.
  • “ Suck down for success!” * ** *** **** **** *“He [Gust Avarkotos] had become something of a legend with these people who manned the underbelly of the Agency [CIA],” from Charlie Wilson’s War **Getting to know “the risk guys” [GE Power] *** “Spend less time with your customer!” **** C(I) > C(E) *****The ATT systems sales exec
  • Loser: “He’s such a suck-up!” Winner: “He’s such a suck-down.”
  • ??????? “Success doesn’t depend on the number of people you know; it depends on the number of people you know in hi g h places!” or “Success doesn’t depend on the number of people you know; it depends on the number of people you know in low places!”
  • S = ƒ(#&DR; -2L, -3L, -4L, I&E) Success is a function of: Number and depth of relationships 2, 3, and 4 levels down inside and outside the organization S = ƒ(SD>SU) Sucking down is more important than sucking up—the idea is to have the [your] entire organization working for you. S = ƒ(#non-FF, #non-FL) Number of friends not in my function S = ƒ(#XFL/m) Number of lunches with colleagues in other functions per month S = ƒ(#FF) Number of friends in the finance organization
  • S =ƒ(#PK“ W ”P) S = ƒ(#PK“ L ”P) # of people you know in the “wrong” places # of people you know in “low” places
  • Excellence: The 11H * “ Theory of Everything” 15 November 2010/Tom Peters *Also see original 3H “Theory of Everything” at APPENDIX, end of this presentation
  • H1
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • Conrad Hilton …
  • Conrad Hilton, at a gala celebrating his career, was asked, “What was the most important lesson you’ve learned in your long and distinguished career?” His immediate answer …
  • “ remember to tuck the shower curtain inside the bathtub ”
  • “ Execution is strategy.” —Fred Malek
  • “ Execution is the job of the business leader .” —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/ Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
  • “ Execution is a systematic process of rigorously discussing hows and whats, tenaciously following through, and ensuring accountability.” —Larry Bossidy & Ram Charan/ Execution: The Disci p line of Getting Things Done
  • “ In real life, strategy is actually very straightforward. Pick a general direction … and im p lement like hell ” —Jack Welch
  • “ Costco figured out the big , simple things and executed with total fanaticism .” —Charles Munger, Berkshire Hathaway
  • “ GE has set a standard of candor. … There is no puffery. … There isn’t an ounce of denial in the place .” —Kevin Sharer, CEO Amgen, on the “GE mystique” (Fortune)
  • “ The art of war does not require complicated maneuvers; the simplest are the best and common sense is fundamental. From which one might wonder how it is generals make blunders; it is because the y tr y to be clever .” —Napoleon
  • Internal organizational excellence = Deepest “Blue Ocean”
  • “ The score takes care of itself.” —Bill Walsh
  • 30 -fold!
  • B(I) > B(O)
  • “ If there is any one ‘secret’ to effectiveness, it is concentration. Effective executives do first things first and they do one thing at a time.” —Peter Drucker
  • H2
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • 25
  • Sunday “Drive By”: The CEO of a very successful mid-sized bank, in the Midwest, attended a seminar of mine in northern California in the mid-’80s—but I remember the following as if it were yesterday. I’ve forgotten the specific context, but I recall him saying to me, pretty much word for word, “Tom let me tell you the definition of a good lending officer. After church on Sunday, on the way home with his family, he takes a little detour to drive by the factory he just lent money to. Doesn’t go in or any such thing, just drives by and takes a look.”
  • “ I call 60 CEOs [in the first week of the year] to wish them happy New Year. …” —Hank Paulson, former CEO, Goldman Sachs Source: Fortune , “Secrets of Greatness,” 0320.05
  • MBWA Managing By Wandering Around/ HP
  • Dov Frohman: The “50% Rule” Dov Frohman: “Daydream!”
  • You = Your calendar * *The calendar never lies.
  • “ You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” Gandhi
  • “ Dennis, you need a … ‘To-don’t ’ List !”
  • Don’t > Do* * “Don’ting,” systematic, > WILLPOWER
  • “ It’s alwa y s showtime.” —David D’Alessandro, Career Warfare
  • “ It suddenly occurred to me that in the space of two or three hours …
  • “ It suddenly occurred to me that in the space of two or three hours … he never talked about cars.” — Les Wexner             
  • “ On the face of it, shareholder value is the dumbest idea in the world. Shareholder value is a result, not a strategy. … Your main constituencies are your em p lo y ees , your customers and your p roducts .” — Jack Welch, FT, 0313.09, page 1
  • “ Mapping your competitive position” or …
  • The “Have you …” 50
  • 1. Have you in the last 10 days … visited a customer? 2. Have you called a customer … TODAY ?
  • 1. Have you in the last 10 days … visited a customer? 2. Have you called a customer … TODAY? 3. Have you in the last 60-90 days … had a seminar in which several folks from the customer’s operation (different levels, different functions, different divisions) interacted, via facilitator, with various of your folks? 4. Have you thanked a front-line employee for a small act of helpfulness … in the last three days? 5. Have you thanked a front-line employee for a small act of helpfulness … in the last three hours? 6. Have you thanked a front-line employee for carrying around a great attitude … today? 7. Have you in the last week recognized—publicly—one of your folks for a small act of cross-functional co-operation? 8. Have you in the last week recognized—publicly—one of “their” folks (another function) for a small act of cross-functional co-operation? 9. Have you invited in the last month a leader of another function to your weekly team priorities meeting? 10. Have you personally in the last week-month called-visited an internal or external customer to sort out, inquire, or apologize for some little or big thing that went awry? (No reason for doing so? If true—in your mind—then you’re more out of touch than I dared imagine.)
  • 11. Have you in the last two days had a chat with someone (a couple of levels down?) about specific deadlines concerning a project’s next steps? 12. Have you in the last two days had a chat with someone (a couple of levels down?) about specific deadlines concerning a project’s next steps … and what specifically you can do to remove a hurdle? (“Ninety percent of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get things done.”—Peter “His eminence” Drucker.) 13. Have you celebrated in the last week a “small” (or large!) milestone reached? (I.e., are you a milestone fanatic?) 14. Have you in the last week or month revised some estimate in the “wrong” direction and apologized for making a lousy estimate? (Somehow you must publicly reward the telling of difficult truths.) 15. Have you installed in your tenure a very comprehensive customer satisfaction scheme for all internal customers? (With major consequences for hitting or missing the mark.) 16. Have you in the last six months had a week-long, visible, very intensive visit-“tour” of external customers? 17. Have you in the last 60 days called an abrupt halt to a meeting and “ordered” everyone to get out of the office, and “into the field” and in the next eight hours, after asking those involved, fixed (f-i-x-e-d!) a nagging “small” problem through practical action? 18. Have you in the last week had a rather thorough discussion of a “cool design thing” someone has come across—away from your industry or function—at a Web site, in a product or its packaging? 19. Have you in the last two weeks had an informal meeting—at least an hour long—with a front-line employee to discuss things we do right, things we do wrong, what it would take to meet your mid- to long-term aspirations? 20. Have you had in the last 60 days had a general meeting to discuss “things we do wrong” … that we can fix in the next fourteen days?
  • 21. Have you had in the last year a one-day, intense offsite with each (?) of your internal customers—followed by a big celebration of “things gone right”? 22. Have you in the last week pushed someone to do some family thing that you fear might be overwhelmed by deadline pressure? 23. Have you learned the names of the children of everyone who reports to you? (If not, you have six months to fix it.) 24. Have you taken in the last month an interesting-weird outsider to lunch? 25. Have you in the last month invited an interesting-weird outsider to sit in on an important meeting? 26. Have you in the last three days discussed something interesting, beyond your industry, that you ran across in a meeting, reading, etc? 27. Have you in the last 24 hours injected into a meeting “I ran across this interesting idea in [strange place]”? 28. Have you in the last two weeks asked someone to report on something, anything that constitutes an act of brilliant service rendered in a “trivial” situation—restaurant, car wash, etc? (And then discussed the relevance to your work.) 29. Have you in the last 30 days examined in detail (hour by hour) your calendar to evaluate the degree “time actually spent” mirrors your “espoused priorities”? (And repeated this exercise with everyone on team.) 30. Have you in the last two months had a presentation to the group by a “weird” outsider?
  • 31. Have you in the last two months had a presentation to the group by a customer, internal customer, vendor featuring “working folks” 3 or 4 levels down in the vendor organization? 32. Have you in the last two months had a presentation to the group of a cool, beyond-our-industry ideas by two of your folks? 33. Have you at every meeting today (and forever more) re-directed the conversation to the practicalities of implementation concerning some issue before the group? 34. Have you at every meeting today (and forever more) had an end-of-meeting discussion on “action items to be dealt with in the next 4, 48 hours”? (And then made this list public—and followed up in 48 hours.) And made sure everyone has at least one such item.) 35. Have you had a discussion in the last six months about what it would take to get recognition in local-national poll of “best places to work”? 36. Have you in the last month approved a cool-different training course for one of your folks? 37. Have you in the last month taught a front-line training course? 38. Have you in the last week discussed the idea of Excellence? (What it means, how to get there.) 39. Have you in the last week discussed the idea of “Wow”? (What it means, how to inject it into an ongoing “routine” project.) 40. Have you in the last 45 days assessed some major process in terms of the details of the “experience,” as well as results, it provides to its external or internal customers?
  • 41. Have you in the last month had one of your folks attend a meeting you were supposed to go to which gives them unusual exposure to senior folks? 42. Have you in the last 60 (30?) days sat with a trusted friend or “coach” to discuss your “management style”—and its long- and short-term impact on the group? 43. Have you in the last three days considered a professional relationship that was a little rocky and made a call to the person involved to discuss issues and smooth the waters? (Taking the “blame,” fully deserved or not, for letting the thing-issue fester.) 44. Have you in the last … two hours … stopped by someone’s (two-levels “down") office-workspace for 5 minutes to ask “What do you think?” about an issue that arose at a more or less just completed meeting? (And then stuck around for 10 or so minutes to listen—and visibly taken notes.) 45. Have you … in the last day … looked around you to assess whether the diversity pretty accurately maps the diversity of the market being served? (And …) 46. Have you in the last day at some meeting gone out of your way to make sure that a normally reticent person was engaged in a conversation—and then thanked him or her, perhaps privately, for their contribution? 47. Have you during your tenure instituted very public (visible) presentations of performance? 48. Have you in the last four months had a session specifically aimed at checking on the “corporate culture” and the degree we are true to it—with all presentations by relatively junior folks, including front-line folks? (And with a determined effort to keep the conversation restricted to “real world” “small” cases—not theory.) 49. Have you in the last six months talked about the Internal Brand Promise? 50. Have you in the last year had a full-day off site to talk about individual (and group) aspirations?
  • “ The doctor interrupts after …* *Source: Jerome Groopman, How Doctors Think
  • 18 seconds
  • 18 seconds!
  • [An obsession with] Listening is ... the ultimate mark of Respect. Listening is ... the heart and soul of Engagement . Listening is ... the heart and soul of Kindness . Listening is ... the heart and soul of Thoughtfulness . Listening is ... the basis for true Collaboration . Listening is ... the basis for true Partnership . Listening is ... a Team Sport . Listening is ... a Developable Individual Skill .* (*Though women are far better at it than men.) Listening is ... the basis for Community . Listening is ... the bedrock of Joint Ventures that work . Listening is ... the bedrock of Joint Ventures that grow . Listening is ... the core of effective Cross-functional Communication * (*Which is in turn Attribute #1 of organizational effectiveness.) [cont.]
  •  
  • Best Listeners Win … “ if you don’t listen, you don’t sell anything.” — Carolyn Marland
  • If you agree with the above, shouldn’t listening be ... a Core Value? If you agree with the above, shouldn’t listening be ... perhaps Core Value #1?* (*“We are Effective Listeners—we treat Listening EXCELLENCE as the Centerpiece of our Commitment to Respect and Engagement and Community and Growth.”) If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... a Core Competence? If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... Core Competence #1? If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... an explicit “agenda item” at every Meeting? If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... our Strategy—per se? (Listening = Strategy.) If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... the #1 skill we look for in Hiring (for every job)?
  • “ We are Effective Listeners—we treat Listening EXCELLENCE as the Centerpiece of our Commitment to Respect and Engagement and Community and Growth.”
  • If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... the #1 attribute we examine in our Evaluations? If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... the #1 skill we look for in Promotion decisions? If you agree, shouldn’t listening be ... the #1 Training priority at every stage of everyone’s career—from Day #1 to Day LAST? If you agree, what are you going to do about it ... in the next 30 MINUTES? If you agree, what are you going to do about it ... at your NEXT meeting? If you agree, what are you going to do about it ... by the end of the DAY? If you agree, what are you going to do about it ... in the next 30 DAYS? If you agree, what are you going to do about it ... in the next 12 MONTHS?
  • *Listening is of the utmost … strategic importance! *Listening is a proper … core value ! *Listening is … trainable ! *Listening is a … profession !
  • Listen = “Profession” = Study = practice = evaluation = Enterprise value
  • Message: Listening is a … profession !
  • Listen! • Listening Leaders: The Ten Golden Rules To Listen, Lead & Succeed—Lyman Steil and Richard Bommelje • The Zen of Listening—Rebecca Shafir • Effective Listening Skills—Dennis Kratz and Abby Robinson Kratz • Are You Really Listening?—Paul Donoghue and Mary Siegel • Active Listening: Improve Your Ability to Listen and Lead—Michael Hoppe • Listening: The Forgotten Skill — Madelyn Burley-Allen
  • “ You can make more friends in two months b y becomin g interested in other p eo p le than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.” —Dale Carnegie
  • “ It was much later that I realized Dad’s secret. He gained respect by giving it. He talked and listened to the fourth-grade kids in Spring Valley who shined shoes the same way he talked and listened to a bishop or a college president. He was seriously interested in who you were and what you had to say.” — Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Respect
  • And the answer is …. otis
  • H3
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • “ You have to treat your employees like customers.” —Herb Kelleher, upon being asked his “secret to success” Source: Joe Nocera, NYT, “Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer,” on the occasion of Herb Kelleher’s retirement after 37 years at Southwest Airlines (SWA’s pilots union took out a full-page ad in USA Today thanking HK for all he had done; across the way in Dallas American Airlines’ pilots were picketing the Annual Meeting)
  • "If you want staff to give great service, give great service to staff." —Ari Weinzweig, Zingerman's
  • Zabar’s Parking Garage * *Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America
  • “ The path to a hostmanshi p culture paradoxically does not go through the guest. In fact it wouldn’t be totally wrong to say that the guest has nothing to do with it. True hostmanship leaders focus on their employees. What drives exceptionalism is finding the right people and getting them to love their work and see it as a passion. ... The guest comes into the picture only when you are ready to ask, ‘Would you prefer to stay at a hotel where the staff love their work or where management has made customers its highest priority?’” “ We went throu g h the hotel and made a ... ‘ consideration renovation. ’ Instead of redoin g bathrooms, dinin g rooms, and g uest rooms, we g ave em p lo y ees new uniforms, bou g ht flowers and fruit, and chan g ed colors. Our focus was totall y on the staff. The y were the ones we wanted to make ha ppy. We wanted them to wake up ever y mornin g excited about a new da y at work.” Source: Jan Gunnarsson and Olle Blohm, Hostmanship: The Art of Making People Feel Welcome .
  • “ We are a ‘Life Success’ Company.” Dave Liniger, founder, RE/MAX
  • “ No matter what the situation, [the great manager’s] first response is always to think about the individual concerned and how things can be arranged to help that individual experience success.” —Marcus Buckingham, The One Thing You Need to Know
  • “ Managing winds up being the management of the allocation of resources against tasks. Leadership focuses on people. M y definition of a leader is someone who hel p s p eo p le succeed .” —Carol Bartz, Yahoo!
  • “ Business has to give people enriching, rewarding lives … or it's simply not worth doing .” — Richard Branson
  • Brand = Talent.
  • Our Mission To develop and manage talent; to apply that talent, throughout the world, for the benefit of clients; to do so in partnership; to do so with profit. WPP
  •  
  • … no less than Cathedrals in which the full and awesome power of the Imagination and Spirit and native Entrepreneurial flair of diverse individuals is unleashed in passionate pursuit of … Excellence .
  • Oath of Office: Managers/Servant Leaders Our goal is to serve our customers brilliantly and profitably over the long haul. Serving our customers brilliantly and profitably over the long haul is a product of brilliantly serving, over the long haul, the people who serve the customer. Hence, our job as leaders—the alpha and the omega and everything in between—is abetting the sustained growth and success and engagement and enthusiasm and commitment to Excellence of those, one at a time, who directly or indirectly serve the ultimate customer. We—leaders of every stripe—are in the “Human Growth and Development and Success and Aspiration to Excellence business.” “ We” [leaders] only grow when “they” [each and every one of our colleagues] are growing. “ We” [leaders] only succeed when “they” [each and every one of our colleagues] are succeeding. “ We” [leaders] only energetically march toward Excellence when “ they” [each and every one of our colleagues] are energetically marching toward Excellence. Period.
  • “ The role of the Director is to create a space where the actors and actresses can become more than they’ve ever been before, more than they’ve dreamed of being .” —Robert Altman, Oscar acceptance speech
  • “ The ONE Question”: “In the last year [3 years, current job], name the … three people … whose growth you’ve most contributed to. Please explain where they were at the beginning of the year, where they are today, and where they are heading in the next 12 months. Please explain in painstaking detail your development strategy in each case. Please tell me your biggest development disappointment—looking back, could you or would you have done anything differently? Please tell me about your greatest development triumph—and disaster—in the last five years. What are the ‘three big things’ you’ve learned about helping people grow along the way?”
  • “ A man should never be promoted to a managerial position if his vision focuses on people’s weaknesses rather than on their strengths.” Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management
  • Andrew Carnegie’s tombstone inscription Here lies a man Who knew how to enlist In his service Better men than himself Source: Peter Drucker, The Practice of Management
  • TP: “How to throw $500,000 into the sea in one easy lesson!!”
  • < CAPEX > People!
  • 2X Source: Container Store/increase average sale per shopper
  • Luiza Helena, Magazine Luiza
  • Wegmans.
  • “ The four most important words in any organization are …
  • The four most important words in any organization are … “What do you think?” Source: courtesy Dave Wheeler, posted at tompeters.com
  • Tomorrow: How many times will you “ask the WDYT question”? [ Count! ] [Practice makes better!] [This is a STRATEGIC skill!]
  • “ WDYT” = Certification of me as a person of Importance whose opinion is valued.
  • What do managers do for a living? Help! Right? How many of us could call ourselves “professional helpers,” meaning that we have studied—like a professional mastering her craft—“helping”? (Not many, I’d judge.) Ed Schein: Helping: How to Offer, Give, and Receive Help Last chapter: 7 “principles.” E.g.: PRINCIPLE 2: “Effective Help Occurs When the Helping Relationship Is Perceived to Be Equitable. PRINCIPLE 4: “Everything You Say or Do Is an Intervention that Determines the Future of the Relationship.. PRINCIPLE 5: “Effective Helping Begins with Pure Inquiry. PRINCIPLE 6: “It Is the Client Who Owns the Problem.”* (*Love the idea that the employee is a “Client”! Words matter!! Read a quote from NFL player-turned lawyer-turned NFL coach, calling his players “my clients.”) Employee as Client! “ Helping” is what we [leaders] “do” for a living! STUDY/PRACTICE “helping” as you would neurosurgery! (“Helping” is your neurosurgery!)
  • 53 = 53 * ** *No “bit players” **6B+ = 6B+
  • H4
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • “ Courtesies of a small and trivial character are the ones which strike deepest in the grateful and appreciating heart.” —Henry Clay, American Statesman (1777-1852)
  • “ We do no great things, only small things with great love.” —Mother Teresa
  • “ I long to accomplish a great and noble task, but it is my chief duty to accomplish humble tasks as though they were great and noble.” —Helen Keller
  • none !
  • Press Ganey Assoc : 139,380 former patients from 225 hospitals: none of THE top 15 factors determining P atient S atisfaction referred to patient’s health outcome P.S. directl y related to Staff Interaction P.P.S. directl y correlated with Emplo y ee Satisfaction Source: Putting Patients First , Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel
  • “ There is a misconception that supportive interactions require more staff or more time and are therefore more costly. Although labor costs are a substantial part of any hospital budget, the interactions themselves add nothing to the budget. Kindness is free . Listening to patients or answering their questions costs nothing. It can be argued that negative interactions—alienating patients, being non-responsive to their needs or limiting their sense of control—can be very costly. … Angry, frustrated or frightened patients may be combative, withdrawn and less cooperative—requiring far more time than it would have taken to interact with them initially in a positive way.” — Putting Patients First , Susan Frampton, Laura Gilpin, Patrick Charmel
  • “ Kindness Is Free.” Source: Planetree Alliance/Griffin Hospital
  • K = R = P Kindness = Repeat business = Profit.
  • K = R = P/Kindness = Repeat business = Profit/ Kindness: Kind. Thoughtful. Decent. Caring. Attentive. Engaged. Listens well/obsessively. Appreciative. Open. Visible. Honest. Responsive. On time all the time. Apologizes with dispatch for screwups. “ Over”-reacts to screwups of any magnitude. “ Professional” in all dealings. Optimistic. Understands that kindness to staff breeds kindness to others/outsiders. Applies throughout the “supply chain.” Applies to 100% of customer’s staff. Explicit part of values statement. Basis for evaluation of 100% of our staff.
  • [ALL TOO RARE] EXCELLENCE IN HEALTHCARE PLANETREE ALLIANCE*: BELIEFS STATEMENT We believe … That we are human beings, caring for other human beings We are all caregivers Care giving is best achieved through kindness and compassion Safe, accessible high-quality care is fundamental to patient-centric care In a holistic approach to meeting people’s needs of body, mind and spirit Families, friends and loved ones are vital to the healing process Access to understandable health information can empower individuals to participate in their health The opportunity for individuals to make personal choices related to their care is essential Physical environments can enhance healing, health and wellbeing Illness can be a transformational experience for patients, families and caregivers *The Planetree Alliance, headquartered at the award-winning Griffin Hospital in Derby CT, is an association of hospitals committed to “patient-centric care”; the Planetree Alliance is the chief protagonist in this essential movement.
  • 1 /80* *Post-interview “Thank you” notes
  • “ The deepest human need is the … need to be a pp reciated .” —William James
  • “ One kind word can warm three winter months.” – Japanese Proverb
  • Tomorrow: How many times will you mange to blurt out, “Thank you”? [ Count ‘em! ] [Practice makes better!* *The engineer from Manchester.]] [This is a STRATEGIC skill!]
  • “ I regard a p olo g izin g as the most magical, healing, restorative gesture human beings can make. It is the centerpiece of my work with executives who want to get better.” —Marshall Goldsmith, What Got You Here Won’t Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful.
  •  
  • “ Keep a short enemies list. One enemy can do more damage than the good done by a hundred friends.” — Bill Walsh (from The Score Takes Care of Itself)
  • Relationships (of all varieties) : THERE ONCE WAS A TIME WHEN A THREE - MINUTE PHONE CALL WOULD HAVE AVOIDED SETTING OFF THE DOWNWARD SPIRAL THAT RESULTED IN A COMPLETE RUPTURE.
  • The “three-minute call” often-usually-invariably leads to a stren g thenin g of the relationship. It not only acts as atonement but also paves the path for a “better than ever” trajectory.
  • THE PROBLEM IS RARELY/NEVER THE PROBLEM. THE RESPONSE TO THE PROBLEM INVARIABLY ENDS UP BEING THE REAL PROBLEM . * *PERCEPTION IS ALL THERE IS!
  • *effective “Repair”/Apology is of the utmost … strategic importance! *effective repair is a proper … core value ! *effective repair is … trainable ! *effective repair is a … profession !
  • Comeback [big, quick response] >> Perfection
  • Acquire vs maintain*: 5X *Recession goal: Higher “market share” current customers
  • “ One of the secrets of a long and fruitful life is to forgive everybody of everything every night right before going to bed.” —Bernard Baruch
  • Enterprise Value: “We are thoughtful in all we do.”
  • Thoughtfulness is key to customer retention . Thoughtfulness is key to em p lo y ee recruitment and satisfaction . Thoughtfulness is key to brand perception . Thoughtfulness is key to your ability to look in the mirror —and tell your kids about your job. “ Thoughtfulness is free .” Thoughtfulness is key to s p eedin g thin g s u p— it reduces friction . Thoughtfulness is key to trans p arenc y and even cost containment —it abets rather than stifles truth-telling.
  • “ The ‘golden rule’ is of no use whatsoever unless you realize it is your move.” —Frank Crane
  • *Thoughtfulness is of the utmost … strategic importance! *thoughtfulness is a proper … core value ! *Thoughtfulness is … trainable ! *Thoughtfulness is a … profession !
  • Hard Is Soft Soft Is Hard
  • Hard Is Soft (Plans, # s ) Soft Is Hard (people, customers, values, relationships)
  • Give good tea!
  • Edward VII B. Franklin Or Not: Clinton-Cornwallis-Yorktown
  • “ In the same bitter winter of 1776 that Gen. George Washington led his beleaguered troops across the Delaware River to safety, Benjamin Franklin sailed across the Atlantic to Paris to engage in an equally crucial campaign, this one diplomatic. A lot depended on the bespectacled and decidedly unfashionable 70-year-old as he entered the world’s fashion capitol sporting a simple brown suit and a fur cap. … Franklin’s miracle was that armed only with his cann y personal charm and reputation as a scientist and philosopher, he was able to cajole a wary French government into lending the fledgling American nation an enormous fortune. … The enduring image of Franklin in Paris tends to be that of a flirtatious old man, too busy visiting the city’s fashionable salons to pursue affairs of state as rigorously as John Adams. When Adams joined Franklin in Paris in 1779, he was scandalized by the late hours and French lifestyle his colleague had adopted [says Stacy Schiff, in A Great Improvisation ]. Adams was clueless that it was through the dropped hints and seemingly offhand remarks at these salons that so much of French diplomacy was conducted. … Like the Beatles arriving in America, Franklin aroused a fervor—his face appeared on prints, teacups and chamber pots. The extraordinary popularity served Franklin’s diplomatic purposes splendidly. Not even King Louis XVI could ignore the enthusiasm that had won over both the nobility and the bourgeoisie. …” Source: “In Paris, Taking the Salons By Storm: How the Canny Ben Franklin Talked the French into Forming a Crucial Alliance,” U.S. News & World Report , 0707.08
  • “ Berezovsky … came under attack from the newly powerful Primakov, and was shunned by most of the political elite . Putin made a p oint of attendin g Berezovsk y ’s wife’s birthda y part y. Berezovsky repaid Putin by championing his candidacy to run the F.S.B., Russia’s secret police, formerly the K.G.B., and ultimately by suggesting that the Family make him president. To sum up, the man’s qualifications were: he did not take a bribe from a car dealership and had been unafraid to go to a party for an acquaintance who had fallen into disfavor.” —”Dead Soul,” Vanity Fair, October 2008
  • “ Allied commands depend on mutual confidence [and this confidence is] gained, above all through the develo p ment of friendshi p s .” — General D.D. Eisenhower, Armchair General* (05.08) *“Perhaps his most outstanding ability [at West Point] was the ease with which he made friends and earned the trust of fellow cadets who came from widely varied backgrounds; it was a quality that would pay great dividends during his future coalition command.”
  • The Real World’s “Little” Rule Book Ben/tea Norm/tea DDE/make friends WFBuckley/make friends-help friends Gust/Suck down Charlie/poker pal-BOF Edward VII/dance-flatter-mingle-learn the language Vladimir Putin/birthday party of outgroup guy’s wife CIO/finance network ERP installer/consult-“one line of code” GE Energy/make friends risk assessment GWB/check the invitation list GHWB/T-notes Hank/60 calls MarkM/5K-5M Delaware/show up Oppy/snub Lewis Strauss NM/smile -$4.3T/tin ear tp.com/Big 4-What do you think? Women/genes Banker/after church Total Bloody Mess/Can they pay back the loan?
  • R.O.I.R.
  • R eturn O n I nvestment In R elationships
  • “ The 7-S Model” Strategy Structure Systems Style Skills Staff Super-ordinate goal
  • “ The 7-S Model” “Hard S s ” (Strategy, Structure, Systems) “Soft S S ” (Style, Skills, Staff, Super-ordinate goal)
  • “ The 7-S Model” Strategy Structure Systems Style (Corporate “Culture,” “The way we do things around here”) Skills (“Distinctive Competence/s”) Staff (People-Talent) Super-ordinate goal (Vision, Core Values)
  • “ If I could have chosen not to tackle the IBM culture head-on, I probably wouldn’t have. My bias coming in was toward strategy, analysis and measurement. In comparison, changing the attitude and behaviors of hundreds of thousands of people is very, very hard. [Yet] I came to see in my time at IBM that culture isn’t just one aspect of the game — it is the game .” —Lou Gerstner, Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance
  • “… it is the game.”
  • 30 -fold!
  • EXCELLENCE/Five Or Less Words To The Wise 4 most important words: “What do you think?” (Dave Wheeler @ tompeters.com: “Most important 4 words in an organization.”) 4 most important words: “How can I help?” (Boss as CHRO/ Chief Hurdle Removal Officer) 2 most important words: “Thank you!” (Appreciation/ Recognition) 2 most important words: “All yours.” (“Hands-off” delegation/ Respect/Trust) 3 most important words: “I’m going out.” (MBWA/Managing By Wandering Around/In touch!) 2 most important words: “I’m sorry.” (Power of unconditional apology = Stunning! Marshall Goldsmith: #1 exec issue) 5 most important words: “Did you tell the customer?” (Over- communicate!) 2 most important words: “She says …” (“She” is the customer!)
  • EXCELLENCE/Five Or Less Words To The Wise 2 most important words: “Yes ma’am.” (Women are more often than not the best managers.) 2 most important words: “Try it!” (My only “for sure” in 44 years: Herb Kelleher: “We have a strategic plan, it’s called doing things.”/Bill Parcells: “Blame no one. Expect nothing. Do something.”) 3 most important words: “Try it again!” (My only “for sure” in 44 years: MOST TRIES WINS.) 2 most important words: “Good try!” (CELEBRATE “good failures.” Richard Farson/book: Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins. Samuel Beckett: “Fail. Fail again. Fail better.”) 3 most important words: “At your service.” (Organizations exist to serve. Period. Leaders live to serve. Period.) 4 most important words: “How are we doing?” (To customers, regularly.) 4 most important words: “How was Mary’s recital?” (Know your employees’ kids.) 2 most important words: “Let’s party!” (Celebrate “small wins” at the drop of a hat.)
  • EXCELLENCE/Five Or Less Words To The Wise 1 most important word: “No.” (“To don’ts” > “To dos”) 1 most important word: “Yes.” (Hey, give it a shot/Anon. quote: “ The best answer is always, ‘What the hell.’”/Wayne Gretzky: “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.”) 2 most important words: “Lunch today?” (“Social stuff” = Secret to problem/opportunity #1:/XFX/ cross-functional Excellence.) 4 most important words: “Thank Dick in accounting.” (Readily acknowledge help from other functions.) 2 most important words: “After you.” (Courtesy rules.) 3 most important words: “Thanks for coming.” (Civility. E.g., boss acknowledges employee coming to her/his office.) 2 most important words: “Great smile!” (Note & acknowledge good attitude.) 1 most important word: “Wow!” (The gold standard … for everything.) 1 most important word: “EXCELLENT!” (The … ONLY … acceptable standard/aspiration.)
  • H5
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • READY. FIRE! AIM. H. Ross Perot (vs “ Aim! Aim! Aim!” /EDS vs GM/1985)
  • “ We have a strategic plan. It’s called doing things.” —Herb Kelleher
  • A man approached JP Morgan, held up an envelope, and said, “Sir, in my hand I hold a guaranteed formula for success, which I will gladly sell you for $25,000.” “Sir,” JP Morgan replied, “I do not know what is in the envelope, however if you show me, and I like it, I give you my word as a gentleman that I will pay you what you ask.” The man agreed to the terms, and handed over the envelope. JP Morgan opened it, and extracted a single sheet of paper. He gave it one look, a mere glance, then handed the piece of paper back to the gent. And paid him the agreed upon $25,000.
  • 1. Every morning, write a list of the things that need to be done that day. 2. Do them. Source: Hugh MacLeod/tompeters.com/NPR
  • Korea!
  • “ We made mistakes, of course. Most of them were omissions we didn’t think of when we initially wrote the software. We fixed them by doing it over and over, again and again. We do the same today. While our competitors are still sucking their thumbs trying to make the design perfect, we’re already on prototype version # 5 . By the time our rivals are ready with wires and screws, we are on version # 10 . It gets back to planning versus acting : We act from day one ; others plan how to plan — for months .” —Bloomberg by Bloomberg
  • Culture of Prototyping “Effective prototyping may be the most valuable core competence an innovative organization can hope to have.” —Michael Schrage
  • Think about It!? Innovation = Reaction to the Prototype Source: Michael Schrage
  • “ Experiment fearlessly” Source: BusinessWeek , Type A Organization Strategies/ “How to Hit a Moving Target”— Tactic #1
  • “ relentless trial and error” * *cornerstone of effective approach to “rebalancing” company portfolios in the face of changing and uncertain global economic conditions (Wall Street Journal, 11.08.10)
  • Mickey Drexler **Bias for instant action/Towering impatience with in-action **Impatient but not brutal **Relentless/Speed-of-light experimentation; more ASAP if works, drop if not **Vibrates with energy (literally) **Always on the prowl—anywhere, everywhere—for ideas **Lots of team-standing-around-making-instant-assessments-decisions—all contributing **Likes working with women more than men because F more intuitive than M **Dresses like the brand—at 66 **Offense, not defense **Communicates all the time [removes fear from hearing “famous” CEO]. Everyone, including most junior, made part of the decision-making team **Listens attentively regardless of age/seniority **Obvious in his transparent respect for young employees **Trusts intuition plus fanatic about the numbers **Expects everyone to know their numbers cold from memory **Always aware of “the business case”—as well as fashion-master **Aggressive pricing **MBWA/Managing By Wandering Around **Open with everyone, from youth to folks at Earnings Call **Constant customer contact/Dialogues with customer/React instantly to customer feedback **Willing to act (experiment) based on one datapoint **Engages with most junior people ** At 66, comfortably uses “hot” words like “Cool” “Wow” Source: The New Yorker /0920.10
  • We are the company we keep
  • The “We are what we eat” axiom: At its core, ever y (!!!) relationship-partnership decision (employee, vendor, customer, etc) is a strate g ic decision about: “Innovate, ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ ”
  • FFFF* *Find a Fellow Freak Faraway
  • “ Who’s the most interesting person you’ve met in the last 90 days? How do I get in touch with them?” —Fred Smith
  • “ Somewhere in your organization, groups of people are alread y doin g thin g s differentl y and better. To create lasting change, find these areas of positive deviance and fan the flames.” —Richard Pascale & Jerry Sternin, “Your Company’s Secret Change Agents,” HBR
  • “ d”iversity
  • “ Diverse groups of problem solvers—groups of people with diverse tools—consistently outperformed groups of the best and the brightest. If I formed two groups, one random (and therefore diverse) and one consisting of the best individual performers, the first group almost always did better. … Diversity trumped ability .” —Scott Page, The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies
  • Can you pass the … “Squint test”?
  • “‘ Decentralization’ is not a piece of paper. It’s not me. It’s either in your heart , or not.” — Brian Joffe/BIDvest
  • Enemy #1 I.C.D. Note 1: Inherent/Inevitable/ Immutable Centralist Drift Note 2: Jim Burke’s 1-word vocabulary: “No.”
  • “ Fail. Forward. Fast.” High Tech CEO, Pennsylvania
  • “ Fail. Fail again. Fail better.” —Samuel Beckett
  • “ Reward excellent failures. Punish mediocre successes.” Phil Daniels, Sydney exec
  • “ In business, you reward people for taking risks . When it doesn’t work out you p romote them-because they were willing to try new things. If people tell me they skied all day and never fell down, I tell them to try a different mountain.” —Michael Bloomberg ( BW /0625.07)
  • “ It is not enough to ‘tolerate’ failure—you must ‘celebrate’ failure.” —Richard Farson ( Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins )
  • Success 101: “Whoever tries the most stuff and screws the most stuff up and most rapidly launches the next try wins. Failures are not to be ‘tolerated,’ they are to be celebrated.”
  • &quot;How often I found where I should be going only by setting out for somewhere else.” — Buckminster Fuller
  • He who has the quickest “O.O.D.A. Loops” * wins! * O bserve. O rient. D ecide. A ct. /Col. John Boyd
  • OODA Loo p /Bo y d C y cle “Unraveling the competition”/ Quick Transients/ Quick Tempo (NOT JUST SPEED!)/ Agility/ “So quick it is disconcerting” (adversary over-reacts or under-reacts)/ “Winners used tactics that caused the enemy to unravel before the fight” (NEVER HEAD TO HEAD) BOYD: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War (Robert Coram)
  • Read This! Richard Farson & Ralph Keyes: Whoever Makes the Most Mistakes Wins: The Paradox of Innovation
  • “ The secret of fast progress is inefficienc y , fast and furious and numerous failures.” —Kevin Kelly
  • “ No man ever became great except through many and great mistakes.” —William Gladstone
  • “ I have missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. On 26 occasions I have been entrusted to take the game winning shot—and missed. And I have failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.” —Michael Jordan
  • 1 /45
  • Excellence1982: The Bedrock “Eight Basics” 1. A Bias for Action 2. Close to the Customer 3. Autonomy and Entrepreneurship 4. Productivity Through People 5. Hands On, Value-Driven 6. Stick to the Knitting 7. Simple Form, Lean Staff 8. Simultaneous Loose-Tight Properties
  • “ You miss 100 % of the shots you never take.” —Wayne Gretzky
  • BLAME NOBODY. EXPECT NOTHING. DO SOMETHING.              Source: Locker room sign posted by football coach Bill Parcells
  • H6
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • “ One of my superstitions had always been when I started to go anywhere or to do anything, not to turn back , or stop, until the thing intended was accomplished.” —Grant* *Ulysses Simpson Grant was actually Hiram Ulysses Grant
  • “ This [adolescent] incident [of getting from point A to point B] is notable not only because it underlines Grant’s fearless horsemanship and his determination, but also it is the first known example of a very important peculiarity of his character: Grant had an extreme, almost phobic dislike of turning back and retracing his steps . If he set out for somewhere, he would get there somehow, whatever the difficulties that lay in his way. This idiosyncrasy would turn out to be one the factors that made him such a formidable general. Grant would always, always press on—turning back was not an option for him.” — Michael Korda, Ulysses Grant
  • H7
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • On ADMIRAL HORATIO NELSON: “[other] admirals more frightened of losing than anxious to win”
  • The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we reach it. Michelangelo
  • H8
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • 7X. 7:30A-8:00P. F12A. 7:30AM = 7:15AM. 8:00PM = 8:15PM.
  • 2,000,000
  • Conveyance: Kingfisher Air Location: Approach to New Delhi
  • “ May I clean your glasses, sir?”
  • Five pianos
  • Carl’s Street- Sweeper
  • It BEGINS (and ENDS ) in the …
  • parking lot * *Disney
  • F L O W E R P O W E R * *Thanks, Stanley Marcus
  •  
  • “ Think of a $350,000 note walking in the door.”
  • Little = BIG
  • Big carts = 1.5X Source: Walmart
  • Bag sizes = New markets: $B Source: PepsiCo
  • Socks = 10,000
  • 401(k) active opt-in: 45% 401(k) as default: 86% Source: New York Times, 1202.08 (research by Richard Thaler, co-author Nudge )
  • <TG W and … >TG R [Things Gone WRONG -Things Gone RIGHT ]
  • “ Experiences are as distinct from services as services are from goods.” —Joe Pine & Jim Gilmore, The Experience Economy: Work Is Theatre & Every Business a Stage
  • And in Milwaukee …
  • Experience: “Rebel Lifestyle!” “What we sell is the ability for a 43-year-old accountant to dress in black leather, ride through small towns and have people be afraid of him.” Harley exec, quoted in Results-Based Leadership
  • “ At our core, we’re a coffee company, but the opportunity we have to extend the brand is beyond coffee; it’s entertainment .” —Howard Schultz (“The Starbucks Aesthetic,” NYT , 10.22.06)
  • “ An adventure in ‘shoppertainment’” — Jungle Jim’s International Market, Fairfield, OH (George Whalin, Retail Superstars )
  • “ At our core, we’re a coffee company, but the opportunity we have to extend the brand is beyond coffee; it’s entertainment .” —Howard Schultz (“The Starbucks Aesthetic,” NYT , 10.22.06)
  • “ It’s simple, really, Tom. Hire for  s, and, above all , p romote for  s.” —Starbucks middle manager/field
  • C X O * *Chief e X perience Officer
  • All E q ual Exce p t … “At Sony we assume that all products of our competitors have basically the same technology, price, performance and features. Desi g n is the onl y thin g that differentiates one p roduct from another in the market p lace .” —Norio Ohga
  • “ Design is treated like a religion at BMW.” —Fortune
  • “ We don’t have a good language to talk about this kind of thing. In most people’s vocabularies, design means veneer. … But to me, nothing could be further from the meaning of design. Design is the fundamental soul of a man-made creation.” —Steve Jobs
  • Hypothesis: DESIGN is the p rincipal difference between love and hate!
  • C D O * *Chief Design Officer
  • “ The ‘surplus society’ has a surplus of similar companies, employing similar people, with similar educational backgrounds, coming up with similar ideas, producing similar things, with similar prices and s imilar quality.” —Kjell Nordstr ö m and Jonas Ridderstr å le, Funky Business
  • The Value-added Ladder Spellbinding Experiences Services Goods Raw Materials
  • Furniture vs. Dreams “We do not sell ‘furniture’ at Domain. We sell dreams . This is accomplished by addressing the half-formed needs in our customers’ heads. By uncovering these needs, we, in essence, fill in the blanks. We convert ‘needs’ into ‘dreams.’ Sales are the inevitable result .” — Judy George, Domain Home Fashions
  • “ The sun is setting on the Information Society—even before we have fully adjusted to its demands as individuals and as companies. We have lived as hunters and as farmers, we have worked in factories and now we live in an information-based society whose icon is the computer. We stand facin g the fifth kind of societ y : the Dream Societ y. … Future products will have to appeal to our hearts, not to our heads. Now is the time to add emotional value to products and services.” Rolf Jensen/ The Dream Society: How the Coming Shift from Information to Imagination Will Transform Your Business
  • The Value-added Ladder Dreams Come True Spellbinding Experiences Services Goods Raw Materials
  • “ When I first suggested that Love was the way to transform business, grown CEOs blushed and slid down behind annual accounts. But I kept at them. I knew it was Love that was missing. I knew that Love was the only way to ante up the emotional temperature and create the new kinds of relationships brands needed. I knew that Love * was the only way business could respond to the rapid shift in control to consumers.” —Kevin Roberts/ Lovemarks * Stew’s bag in coffin
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  •  
  •  
  •  
  • The Value-added Ladder Lovemark Dreams Come True Spellbinding Experiences Services Goods Raw Materials
  • C L O * *Chief Lovemar k Officer
  • More Moore
  • Up, Up, Up, Up the Value-added Ladder.
  • $50B+* *IBM Global Services/ “Systems integrator of choice”
  • MasterCard Advisors
  • California Closets: “a whole-life upgrade, not just a tidy bedroom.” — WSJ /0329.07, “Why the Closet- Store Guy Wants to Be Your Therapist”
  • I. LAN Installation Co. (3%) II. Geek Squad. (30%.) III. Acquired by BestBuy. IV. Flagship of BestBuy Wholesale “Solutions” Strategy Makeover.
  • The Value-added Ladder Customer Success/ Gamechanging Solutions Lovemark Dreams Come True Spellbinding Experiences Services Goods Raw Materials
  • The Value-added Ladder/ OPPORTUNITY-SEEKING Customer Success/ Gamechanging Solutions Services Goods Raw Materials
  • H9
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hsieh Hill Hartville Helgesen
  • Hartville Hardware Hartville, Ohio, pop <2,500 100,000 square feet (plus catalog, Web serve location) Family run “One of biggest and best tool merchants in USA” Customers from 100s of miles away Renowned semi-annual tool sale (12,000 transactions at recent incarnation) Anchor for 110-independent shops @ Hartville MarketPlace Staff as premier trainers Etc. Etc. Source: Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America , George Whalin
  • “ I am often asked by would-be entrepreneurs seeking escape from life within huge corporate structures, ‘How do I build a small firm for myself?’ The answer seems obvious …
  • “ I am often asked by would-be entrepreneurs seeking escape from life within huge corporate structures, ‘How do I build a small firm for myself?’ The answer seems obvious : Buy a very large one and just wait .” —Paul Ormerod, Why Most Things Fail: Evolution, Extinction and Economics
  • “ Mr. Foster and his McKinsey colleagues collected detailed performance data stretching back 40 years for 1,000 U.S. companies. The y found that none of the lon g -term survivors mana g ed to out p erform the market. Worse, the lon g er com p anies had been in the database, the worse the y did .” —Financial Times
  • “ It’s just a fact: Survivors underperform.” —Dick Foster
  • “ Data drawn from the real world attest to a fact that is beyond our control: Ever y thin g in existence tends to deteriorate .” —Norberto Odebrecht, Education Through Work
  • Dick Kovacevich: You don’t get better by being bigger. You get worse.”
  • #4 Japan #3 USA #2 China #1 Germany
  • MittELstand * ** * “agile creatures darting between the legs of the multinational monsters&quot; (Bloomberg BusinessWeek, 10.10) **E.g. Goldmann Produktion
  • “ agile creatures darting between the legs of the multinational monsters&quot; Source: Bloomberg BusinessWeek on the German … MITTELSTAND
  • Larry Janesky Rocks …
  • *Basement Systems Inc. (Seymour CT) * Dry Basement Science (115,000!) *1990: $0; 2003: $13M; 2008: $62,000,000
  • The Red Carpet Store (Joel Resnick/Flemington NJ)
  • Jim’s Mowing Canada Jim’s Mowing UK Jim’s Antennas Jim’s Bookkeeping Jim’s Building Maintenance Jim’s Carpet Cleaning Jim’s Car Cleaning Jim’s Computer Services Jim’s Dog Wash Jim’s Driving School Jim’s Fencing Jim’s Floors Jim’s Painting Jim’s Paving Jim’s Pergolas [gazebos] Jim’s Pool Care Jim’s Pressure Cleaning Jim’s Roofing Jim’s Security Doors Jim’s Trees Jim’s Window Cleaning Jim’s Windscreens Note: Download, free, Jim Penman’s book: What Will They Franchise Next? The Story of Jim’s Group
  • Jim’s Group : Jim Penman.* 1984: Jim’s Mowing. 2006: Jim’s Group. 2,600 franchisees (Australia, NZ, UK). Cleaning. Dog washing. Handyman. Fencing. Paving. Pool care. Etc. “People first.” Private. Small staff. Franchisees can leave at will. 0-1 complaint per year is norm; cut bad ones quickly. *Ph.D. cross-cultural anthropology; mowing on the side Source: MT/Management Today (Australia), Jan-Feb 2006
  • “ Be the best. It’s the only market that’s not crowded.” From: Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America, George Whalin
  • “ You do not merely want to be the best of the best. You want to be considered the only ones who do what you do .” —Jerry Garcia
  • Retail Superstars: Inside the 25 Best Independent Stores in America —by George Whalin
  • Jungle Jim’s International Market, Fairfield, Ohio: “An adventure in ‘ sho pp ertainment ,’ as Jungle Jim’s call it, begins in the parking lot and goes on to 1,600 cheeses and, yes, 1,400 varieties of hot sauce —not to mention 12,000 wines priced from $8 to $8,000 a bottle; all this is brought to you by 4,000 vendors. Customers come from every corner of the globe.” Bronner’s Christmas Wonderland, Frankenmuth, Michigan, pop 5,000: 98,000-square-foot “shop” features the likes of 6,000 Christmas ornaments, 50,000 trims , and anything else you can name if it pertains to Christmas. Source: George Whalin, Retail Superstars Virtual tour: www.retailsuperstars.com
  • Abt Electronics/Family/1936 Insane competition (Chicagoland!) Campus/350K sqft (40K sqmtrs)/37 acres/$300M Design Center (Classes beyond product, etc.) “Destination” like Ikea (restaurant, atrium with spectacular flowers, 7,500 gallon aquarium, etc.) In-house delivery teams (Attn uniform design, etc.) Training/knowledge training!!!!!!!! “Yes.” Period. “Over”-staffed Merchandising (boats displaying marine electronics, cars with various systems, etc.) Web (encyclopedic info re almost all stuff sold, blog, live chat with live experts “24/7”, etc.) Rating services ( >>> Home Depot, Lowes, etc.) Source: George Whalin, Retail Superstars
  • 1. Courses/Workshops/Demos/Engagement 2. Instructional guides/material/books 3. Events & Events & Events 4. Community of customers 5. Destination 6. Women-as-customer 7. Staff selection/training/retention (FANATICISM) 8. Fanaticism/Execution 9. Design/Atmospherics/Ambience 10. Tableaus/Products-in-use 11. Flow/starts & finishes 12. 100% conscious experience/“Moments of truth” 13. Constant experimentation/Pursue LBTs 14. Social Media/Ongoing conversation 15. Community star 16. Aim high 17. PASSION
  • Orvis fly-fishing school/ Fly-fishing Museum Harley Hogs Ikea/Best in LA <$25 Celebration of Golf/ Art of the Game
  •  
  • Small Giants: Companies that Chose to Be Great Instead of Big “ They cultivated exceptionally intimate relationships with customers and suppliers , based on personal contact, one-on-one interaction, and mutual commitment to delivering on promises. “ E ach company had an extraordinarily intimate relationship with the local city, town, or county in which it did business -- a relationship that went well beyond the usual concept of `giving back.’ “ The companies had what struck me as unusually intimate workplaces . “ I noticed the passion that the leaders brought to what the company did. They loved the subject matter , whether it be music, safety lighting, food, special effects, constant torque hinges, beer, records storage, construction, dining, or fashion.&quot;
  • * Lived in same town all adult life *First generation that’s wealthy/ no parental support *“Don’t look like millionaires, don’t dress like millionaires, don’t eat like millionaires, don’t act like millionaires” *“Many of the types of businesses [they] are in could be classified as ‘dull- normal.’ [They] are welding contractors, auctioneers, scrap-metal dealers, lessors of portable toilets, dry cleaners, re-builders of diesel engines, paving contractors …” Source: The Millionaire Next Door , Thomas Stanley & William Danko
  • H10
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  •  
  • “ Forget China , India and the Internet : Economic Growth Is Driven by Women .” Source: Headline, Economist
    • W > 2X (C + I)*
    • * “Women now drive the global economy. Globally, they control about $20 trillion in consumer spending, and that figure could climb as high as $28 trillion in the next five years. Their $13 trillion in total yearly earnings could reach $18 trillion in the same period. In aggregate, women represent a growth market bigger than China and India combined—more than twice as big in fact. Given those numbers, it would be foolish to ignore or underestimate the female consumer. And yet many companies do just that—even ones that are confidant that they have a winning strategy when it comes to women. Consider Dell’s …”
    • Source: Michael Silverstein and Kate Sayre, “The Female Economy,” HBR, 09.09
  • “ One thing is certain: Women’s rise to power, which is linked to the increase in wealth per capita, is happening in all domains and at all levels of society. Women are no longer content to provide efficient labor or to be consumers with rising budgets and more autonomy to spend. … This is just the beginning. The phenomenon will only grow as girls prove to be more successful than boys in the school system. For a number of observers, we have already entered the age of ‘ womenomics,’ the economy as thought out and practiced by a woman .” —Aude Zieseniss de Thuin, Women’s Forum for the Economy and Society
  • “ Women are the majority market” —Fara Warner/ The Power of the Purse
  • “ The most significant variable in every sales situation is the gender of the buyer, and more importantly, how the salesperson communicates to the buyer’s gender.” —Jeffery Tobias Halter, Selling to Men, Selling to Women
  • The Perfect Answer Jill and Jack buy slacks in black…
  •  
  • Cases! Cases! Cases! McDonald’s (“mom-centered” to “majority consumer”; not via kids) Home Depot (“Do it [everything!] Herself”) P&G (more than “house cleaner”) DeBeers (“right-hand rings”/$4B) AXA Financial Kodak (women = “emotional centers of the household”) Nike (> jock endorsements; new def sports; majority consumer) Avon Bratz (young girls want “friends,” not a blond stereotype) Source: Fara Warner/ The Power of the Purse
  • Lowe’s !
  • “ Women don’t buy brands. They join them .” EVEolution
  • 2.6 vs. 21
  • “ AS LEADERS, WOMEN RULE : New Studies find that female managers outshine their male counterparts in almost every measure” TITLE/ Special Report/ BusinessWeek
  • Women’s Strengths Match New Economy Imperatives : Link [rather than rank] workers; favor interactive-collaborative leadership style [empowerment beats top-down decision making]; sustain fruitful collaborations; comfortable with sharing information; see redistribution of power as victory, not surrender ; favor multi-dimensional feedback; value technical & interpersonal skills, individual & group contributions equally; readily accept ambiguity; honor intuition as well as pure “rationality”; inherently flexible; appreciate cultural diversity . —Judy B. Rosener, America’s Competitive Secret: Women Managers
  • “ Power Women 100”/ Forbes 25.10.10 26 CEOs Public Companies: Vs. Men/Market: +28% * (*Post-appointment) Vs. Industry: +15%
  • * Women decide * Women save * Women s p end * Women rule
  • *Women decide *Women save *Women s p end *Women rule * In the develo p ed world * In the develo p in g world * The trend is acceleratin g
  • 94 % of loans to … women * * M icrolending; “Banker to the poor”; Grameen Bank; Muhammad Yunus; 2006 Nobel Peace Prize winner
  • “ Baby-boomer Women : The Sweetest of Sweet Spots for Marketers” —David Wolfe and Robert Snyder, Ageless Marketing
  • 44-65 : “New Customer Majority” * *45% larger than 18-43; 60% larger by 2010 Source: Ageless Marketing , David Wolfe & Robert Snyder
  • “ Marketers attempts at reaching those over 50 have been miserably unsuccessful. No market’s motivations and needs are so poorl y understood .” — Peter Francese, founding publisher, American Demographics
  • 7/13
  • !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! “ People turning 50 today have more than half of their adult life ahead of them.” —Bill Novelli, 50+: Igniting a Revolution to Reinvent America
  • 55+ > 55-* *“[55-plus] are more active in online finance, shopping and entertainment than those under 55?” — Forrester Research.(USA Today, 8 January 2009)
  • We are the Aussies & Kiwis & Americans & Canadians. We are the Western Europeans & Japanese. We are the fastest growing, the biggest, the wealthiest, the boldest, the most (yes) ambitious, the most experimental & exploratory, the most different, the most indulgent, the most difficult & demanding, the most service & experience obsessed, the most vigorous, (the least vigorous,) the most health conscious, the most female, the most profoundly important commercial market in the history of the world—and we will be the Center of y our universe for the next twent y -five y ears . We have arrived!
  • H11
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • Zappos 10 Corporate Values Deliver “WOW!” through service. Embrace and drive change. Create fun and a little weirdness. Be adventurous, creative and open-minded. Pursue growth and learning. Build open and honest relationships with communication. Build a positive team and family spirit. Do more with less. Be passionate and determined. Be humble. Source: Delivering Happiness, Tony Hsieh, CEO, Zappos.com
  •  
  • “ Insanely Great” Steve Jobs “Radically thrilling” BMW
  • “ Let us create such a building that future generations will take us for lunatics.” —the church hierarchs at Seville
  • Kevin Roberts’ Credo 1 . Ready. Fire! Aim. 2. If it ain’t broke ... Break it! 3. Hire crazies. 4. Ask dumb questions. 5. Pursue failure. 6. Lead, follow ... or get out of the way! 7. Spread confusion. 8. Ditch your office. 9. Read odd stuff. 10. Avoid moderation !
  • Sir Richard’s Rules: Follow your passions. Keep it simple. Get the best people to help you. Re-create yourself. Play. Source: Fortune on Branson/10.03
  • 14,000 20,000 30
  • 14,000/ e Bay 20,000/Amazon 30 /Craigslist
  • Summary: H11
  • All you need to know … Hilton Howard Herb Henry I Henry II Hiram Horatio Hill Hartville Helgesen Hsieh
  • 11H : H ilton, H oward, H erb, H enry I, H enry II, H iram, H oratio, H ill, H artville, H elgesen, H sieh * Sweat the details! * Stay in touch! * It’s all about the people! * Small courtesies, big payoff! * Most tries wins! * Relentless! * Offense! * Little BIG Things! * Monopoly through EXCELLENCE! * Women rule! * Wow!
  • The Memories That Matter.
  • The Memories That Matter The people you developed who went on to stellar accomplishments inside or outside the company. The (no more than) two or three people you developed who went on to create stellar institutions of their own. The longshots (people with “a certain something”) you bet on who surprised themselves—and your peers. The people of all stripes who 2/5/10/20 years later say “ You made a difference in my life,” “Your belief in me changed everything.” The sort of/character of people you hired in general. (And the bad apples you chucked out despite some stellar traits.) A handful of projects (a half dozen at most) you doggedly pursued that still make you smile and which fundamentally changed the way things are done inside or outside the company/industry. The supercharged camaraderie of a handful of Great Teams aiming to “ change the world.”
  • “ The ONE Question”: “In the last year [3 years, current job], name the … three people … whose growth you’ve most contributed to. Please explain where they were at the beginning of the year, where they are today, and where they are heading in the next 12 months. Please explain in painstaking detail your development strategy in each case. Please tell me your biggest development disappointment—looking back, could you or would you have done anything differently? Please tell me about your greatest development triumph—and disaster—in the last five years. What are the ‘three big things’ you’ve learned about helping people grow along the way.”
  • The Memories That Matter Belly laughs at some of the stupid-insane things you and your mates tried. Less than a closet full of “I should have …” A frighteningly consistent record of having invariably said, “Go for it!” Not intervening in the face of considerable loss—recognizing that to develop top talent means tolerating failures and allowing the person who screwed up to work their own way through and out of their self-created mess. Dealing with one or more crises with particular/memorable aplomb. Demanding … CIVILITY … regardless of circumstances. Turning around one or two or so truly dreadful situations—and watching almost everyone involved rise to the occasion (often to their own surprise) and acquire a renewed sense of purpose in the process. Leaving something behind of demonstrable-lasting worth. (On short as well as long assignments.)
  • The Memories That Matter Having almost always (99% of the time) put “Quality” and “Excellence” ahead of “Quantity.” (At times an unpopular approach.) A few “critical” instances where you stopped short and could have “ done more”—but to have done so would have compromised your and your team’s character and integrity. A sense of time well and honorably spent. The expression of “simple” human kindness and consideration—no matter how harried you may be/may have been. Understood that your demeanor/expression of character always set the tone—especially in difficult situations. Never (rarely) let your external expression of enthusiasm/ determination flag—the rougher the times, the more your expressed energy and bedrock optimism and sense of humor showed. The respect of your peers. A stoic unwillingness to badmouth others—even in private.
  • The Memories That Matter An invariant creed: When something goes amiss, “The buck stops with me”; when something goes right, it was their doing, not yours. A Mandela-like “naïve” belief that others will rise to the occasion if given the opportunity. A reputation for eschewing the “trappings of power.” (Strong self- management of tendencies toward arrogance or dismissiveness.) Intense, even “driven” … but not to the point of being careless of others in the process of forging ahead. Willing time and again to be surprised by ways of doing things that are inconsistent with your “certain hypotheses.” Humility in the face of others, at every level, who know more than you about “the way things really are.” Bit your tongue on a thousand occasions—and listened, really really listened. (And been constantly delighted when, as a result, you invariably learned something new and invariably increased your connection with the speaker.)
  • The Memories That Matter Unalloyed pleasure in being informed of the fallaciousness of your beliefs by someone 15 years your junior and several rungs below you on the hierarchical ladder. Selflessness. (A sterling reputation as “a guy always willing to help out with alacrity despite personal cost.”) As thoughtful and respectful, or more so, toward thine “enemies” as toward friends and supporters. Always and relentlessly put at the top of your list/any list being first and foremost “of service” to your internal and external constituents. (Employees/Peers/Customers/Vendors/Community.) Treated the term “servant leadership” as holy writ. (And “preached” “ servant leadership” to others—new “non-managerial” hire or old pro, age 18 or 48.)
  • The Memories That Matter Created the sort of workplaces you’d like your kids to inhabit. (Explicitly conscious of this “Would I want my kids to work here?” litmus test.) A “certifiable” “nut” about quality and safety and integrity. (More or less regardless of any costs.) A notable few circumstances where you resigned rather than compromise your bedrock beliefs. Perfectionism just short of the paralyzing variety. A self- and relentlessly enforced group standard of “ EXCELLENCE-in-all-we-do”/“EXCELLENCE in our behavior toward one another.”
  • “ In a way, the world is a great liar. It shows you it worships and admires money, but at the end of the day it doesn’t. It says it adores fame and celebrity, but it doesn’t, not really. The world admires, and wants to hold on to, and not lose, goodness. It admires virtue. At the end it gives its greatest tributes to generosity, honesty, courage, mercy, talents well used, talents that, brought into the world, make it better. That’s what it really admires. That’s what we talk about in eulogies, because that’s what’s important. We don’t say, ‘The thing about Joe was he was rich!’ We say, if we can, ‘The thing about Joe was he took good care of people.’” —Peggy Noonan, “A Life’s Lesson,” on the astounding response to the passing of Tim Russert, The Wall Street Journal, June 21-22, 2008
  • Excellence
  • EXCELLENCE. Always. If not EXCELLENCE, what? If not EXCELLENCE now, when? EXCELLENCE is not an &quot;aspiration.&quot; EXCELLENCE is not a &quot;journey.&quot; EXCELLENCE is the next five minutes. Organizations exist to SERVE. Period. Leaders exist to SERVE. Period. SERVICE is a beautiful word. SERVICE is character, community, commitment. (And profit.) SERVICE is a beautiful word. SERVICE is not &quot;Wow.&quot; SERVICE is not &quot;raving fans.&quot; SERVICE is not &quot;a great experience.&quot; Service is &quot;just&quot; that— SERVICE .
  • The “19 Es” of EXCELLENCE Enthusiasm ! (Be an irresistible force of nature! Be fire! Light fires!) Exuberance ! (Vibrate—cause earthquakes!) Execution ! (Do it! Now! Get it done! Barriers are baloney! Excuses are for wimps! Accountability is gospel! Adhere to coach Bill Parcells’ doctrine: “Blame nobody!! Expect nothing!! Do something!!” ) Em p owerment ! (Respect! Appreciation! Ask until you’re blue in the face, “ What do you think?” Then: Listen! Liberate! 100.00% innovators!) Ed g iness ! (Perpetually dance at the frontier and a little, or a lot, beyond.) Enra g ed ! (Maintain a permanent state of mortal combat with the status-quo!) En g a g ed ! (Addicted to MBWA /Managing By Wandering Around. In touch. Always.) Electronic ! (Partner with the whole wide world 60/60/24/7 via all manner of electronic community building and entanglement. Crowdsourcing wins!) Encom p assing ! (Relentlessly pursue diversity of every flavor! Diversity per se generates big returns!) (Seeking superb leaders: Women rule! ) Emotion ! (The alpha! The omega! The essence of leadership! The essence of sales! The essence of design! The essence of life itself! Acknowledge it! Use it!)
  • The “19 Es” of EXCELLENCE Em p ath y! (Connect! Connect! Connect! Click with others’ reality and aspirations! “Walk in the other person’s shoes”—until the soles have holes!) Ears ! (Effective listening in every encounter: Strategic Advantage No. 1! Believe it!) Ex p erience ! (Life is theater! It’s always showtime! Make every contact a “Wow” ! Standard: “Insanely Great”/Steve Jobs; “Radically Thrilling”/BMW.) Eliminate ! (Keep it simple!! Furiously battle hyper-complexity and gobbledygook!!) Error p rone ! (Ready! Fire! Aim! Try a lot of stuff, make a lot of booboos. CELEBRATE the booboos! Try more stuff, make more booboos! He who makes the most mistakes wins! Fail! Forward! Fast!) Evenhanded ! (Straight as an arrow! Fair to a fault! Honest as Abe!) Ex p ectations ! (Michelangelo: “The greatest danger for most of us is not that our aim is too high and we miss it, but that it is too low and we hit it.”) Eudaimonia ! (The essence of Aristotelian philosophy: True happiness is pursuit of the highest of human moral purpose. Be of service! Always!) EXCELLENCE ! (The only standard! Never an exception! Start NOW! No excuses!)
  • “ Excellence … can be obtained if you: ... care more than others think is wise; ... risk more than others think is safe; ... dream more than others think is practical; ... expect more than others think is possible.” Source: Anon. (Posted @ tompeters.com by K.Sriram, November 27, 2006 1:17 AM)
  • Appendix
  • The “3H Theory of Everything” Tom Peters/0913.10
  • Howard Hilton Herb
  • 25
  • Starbucks boss Howard Schultz visits 25 shops a week.
  • Conrad Hilton, at a gala celebrating his life, was asked, “What was the most important lesson you’ve learned in your long and distinguished career?” His immediate answer: “ remember to tuck the shower curtain inside the bathtub ”
  • Conrad Hilton shares his foremost key to success.
  • “ You have to treat your employees like customers.” —Herb Kelleher, upon being asked his “secret to success” Source: Joe Nocera, NYT, “Parting Words of an Airline Pioneer,” on the occasion of Herb Kelleher’s retirement after 37 years at Southwest Airlines (SWA’s pilots union took out a full-page ad in USA Today thanking HK for all he had done; across the way in Dallas American Airlines’ pilots were picketing the Annual Meeting)
  • Herb Kelleher (Southwest Airlines) says this is his only success “secret.”
  • 3H: Howard, Hilton, Herb ** Stay in touch! ** Sweat the details! ** It’s the people, stupid!