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Healthy Hearts Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Learning Areas Levels Objectives Software Description
    • Health, physical education
    • 11- to 13-year-olds
    • Students will identify:
    • Good and bad nutrition for heart health.
    • The potential impact of different activities on the heart.
    • Specific anatomical and physiological features of a healthy heart.
    • Positive and negative life choices as they relate to a healthy heart.
    • Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint, Excel)
    • Nutrition and activity-tracking software
    • In health and physical education classes students learn to use heart-rate monitors, biofeedback machines, nutrition software and pedometers. They collect data, download the data to Excel and create graphs to analyze what they’ve learned. Students empower others to make healthy heart decisions by sharing their work at a community health fair.
    Documents Authors Kirk Mathias, Ken Briggs, and Leanne Oltman, Central Washington University; Ruth Miller and Hilary Lampard, Thorp School
  • 2. Documents Teacher Planning and Management Click the documents below to help you understand the context of this exemplary learning project: Background & Planning: A synopsis of the origin and objectives of the learning project. Discusses how the project was planned and managed. Project Images: Images of the project to give you a better feeling for how the project was implemented.
  • 3. Work Samples and Teacher Reflection Click the documents below to see work samples and reflections from the teachers and students: Student Work Samples: Examples of student-created brochures and PowerPoint presentations that were displayed at the health fair. Teacher Reflection: Thoughts and reflective comments from the teacher, including advice for future implementations. Documents Student Presentation
  • 4. Teaching Resources Click on the documents below to view the teaching resources used with this project: Physical Education Lesson Plan: The lesson plan used in the physical education class component of the project. Health Lesson Plan: The lesson plan used in the health class component of the project. Other Teaching Resources: A document with heart facts and a spreadsheet showing target heart rate zones for students 11-15 years old. Documents
  • 5. Assessment and Standards Click the documents below to see the assessment rubrics and standards cover in this learning project: Assessment Rubric: An assessment rubric provided to students showing how their participation in the health fair was to be evaluated. Cardio Quiz: The quiz used in the Physical Education class. Mapping the Standards: Mapping this project’s learning objectives against curriculum standards. National Educational Technology Standards (NETS) for Students: Performance indicators for technology-literate students. Documents
  • 6. Teacher Guide Click the documents below to learn from this project and create your own classroom project: The Starting Point: Questions to keep in mind when reviewing this project. Using the Tour Model: Questions to consider before you begin to create a technology-integrated project based on this Virtual Classroom Tour. Authentic Assessment: Understanding that assessment needs to move into the realm of authenticity helps to make learning more meaningful for students. Implementing a Project: Some questions to consider at the implementation stage of a learning project. Record Your Thoughts: A document in which you can record your comments and reflections as you create your own learning project. Documents
  • 7. Staff Developer Guide Click the documents below to learn from this project and help your staff create their own learning projects: The Starting Point: Questions to keep in mind when reviewing this project with your faculty. Using the Tour Model: Questions to pose as you assist others in creating a technology-integrated project based on this Virtual Classroom Tour. Authentic Assessment: Keys to promoting the understanding that assessment needs to move into the realm of authenticity in order to make learning more meaningful for students. Implementing a Project: Some questions to pose at the implementation stage of a learning project. Documents
  • 8. Microsoft Office Training Resources Click the links below to access training resources on Microsoft Office and other software: Microsoft Innovative Teachers : Find the latest classroom resources and professional development tools. http://www.microsoft.com/education/Innovativeteachers Tutorials : Learn to create rich learning experiences using Microsoft products and technologies. http://www.microsoft.com/education/?ID=Tutorials Productivity in the Classroom: Lesson plans with great ideas for integrating technology into teaching and learning. http://www.microsoft.com/education/?ID=LessonPlans Office Tips for Teachers: Ready-to-use ideas that integrate Office programs into subject areas such as math, science, and language arts. http://www.microsoft.com/education/default.asp?ID=ClassTipsArchive
  • 9. Learning Areas Levels Objectives Software Description
    • Health, physical education
    • 11- to 13-year-olds
    • Students will identify:
    • Good and bad nutrition for heart health.
    • The potential impact of different activities on the heart.
    • Specific anatomical and physiological features of a healthy heart.
    • Positive and negative life choices as they relate to a healthy heart.
    • Microsoft Office (Word, PowerPoint, Excel)
    • Nutrition and activity-tracking software
    • In health and physical education classes students learn to use heart-rate monitors, biofeedback machines, nutrition software and pedometers. They collect data, download the data to Excel and create graphs to analyze what they’ve learned. Students empower others to make healthy heart decisions by sharing their work at a community health fair.
    Documents Authors Kirk Mathias, Ken Briggs, and Leanne Oltman, Central Washington University; Ruth Miller and Hilary Lampard, Thorp School
    • To use this tour:
    • Read the overview information on this page.
    • Click the Teacher Planning link to learn about the project. The documents contain background and planning information, and classroom images.
    • Click the Work Samples & Reflections link to see examples of student work, as well as teacher and student reflection on the project.
    • Click the Teaching Resources link to see the classroom resources used by the teachers.
    • Click the Assessment & Standards link to see the how this project maps against standards.
    • Click the Guides links to access guidance on using this tour to build your own learning project.
      • Click to close
  • 10. Benefits of Fitness Presentation By Carley S. & Gabrial E. Teachers: Mrs. French , Ms. Lampard , Ms. Oltman , Mrs. Miller
  • 11. Elements of Fitness
    • Cardiovascular Endurance (Fitness)
    • Muscular Endurance
    • Flexibility
    • Muscular Strength
    • Body Composition
  • 12. Cardiovascular Endurance
    • Cardiovascular
    • Endurances allows the heart, blood vessels, and blood to carry oxygen throughout the body.
    • Since oxygen is needed in every part of the body this is the most important element of fitness.
  • 13. Muscular Endurance
    • Being able to do physical activity for an extended period of time.
    • Examples of Muscular
    • Endurance Activities -
    • Football
    • Basketball
    • Cross Country Running
    • & Skiing
  • 14. Flexibility
    • Being able to stretch your muscles easily. And being able to bend your body without discomfort.
    • Examples of Flexibility
    • Activities -
    • Gymnastics
    • Yoga
    • Karate
  • 15. Muscular Strength
    • Building muscular strength by doing a physical activity or being able to lift a certain amount of weight.
    • Examples of Building Muscular Strength:
      • Weight Lifting
      • Sprinting
      • Gymnastics
  • 16. Body Composition
    • The amount of body
    • fat vs. the amount
    • of muscle you
    • contain in your
    • body.
    If your Body Mass Index (BMI) is 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2 is considered a healthy person. And a person with a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more are at a high risk of heart disease. How the elements of your body are made up.
  • 17. Body Mass Index (BMI) Considered healthy if BMI is 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2. Formula for BMI = Weight x 705 / height (in) / height (in)
  • 18. Benefits of Exercise
    • Live longer
    • Heart muscles become stronger
    • Less physical and mental stress
    • Lower risk of heart attacks & strokes
    • Intake of oxygen improves
    • Blood pressure lowers
    • Reduction in risk of certain cancers - Colon Cancer
      • - Breast Cancer
  • 19. Sources
    • “ New Fitness”, Author Unknown, Copyright Unknown
    • www.new-fitness.com/exercise/benefits.html
    • “ Heart Point – Being Physically Fit”, Copyright 1997, HeartPoint
    • www.heartpoint.com/exercise%20for%20health.html
    • “ Body Composition Tests”, Copy Right 2002, American Heart Association ,Inc.
    • www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4489
    Return to Virtual Classroom Tour