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Generation Y in Workplace
 

Generation Y in Workplace

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Slides from my prentation to the Salina Chamber of Commerce

Slides from my prentation to the Salina Chamber of Commerce

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  • American companies are short of workers. There are 9.6 million unemployed, working-age people with disabilities who would prefer to be working. You are probably reading this because, like most other companies in America, your company can’t afford to ignore a poorly-tapped labor pool of 9.6 million willing workers.  The good news is that there really are 9.6 million unemployed Americans who want jobs. The bad news is that recruiting them isn’t all that easy – particularly finding the ones with the right skills for your job openings.Companies that are proactive about recruiting people with disabilities, companies that proactively do “targeted” recruiting, find that this minority group is quite different from others that they have targeted in the past. Unlike racial and ethnic minorities, people with disabilities are more difficult to target. They do not as readily congregate in groups. With few exceptions, you are unlikely to find high concentrations of people with disabilities in particular neighborhoods, churches, cultural organizations, etc. Similarly, particularly on a local level, there are few media sources (magazines, TV programs, radio shows, etc.) that effectively reach a broad audience within the disability community.Given that, how can your company develop a strategic recruiting program that will enable you to successfully attract applicants with disabilities? A truly successful recruiting program is going to be a multi-faceted one. While there isn’t a proscribed “recipe for success”, there are many ingredients that are typically a part of successful programs – and we will describe them here. Which ones you choose to use (and what proportions you choose to use them in) will be determined by your own resources, commitment and creative planning!
  • American companies are short of workers. There are 9.6 million unemployed, working-age people with disabilities who would prefer to be working. You are probably reading this because, like most other companies in America, your company can’t afford to ignore a poorly-tapped labor pool of 9.6 million willing workers.  The good news is that there really are 9.6 million unemployed Americans who want jobs. The bad news is that recruiting them isn’t all that easy – particularly finding the ones with the right skills for your job openings.Companies that are proactive about recruiting people with disabilities, companies that proactively do “targeted” recruiting, find that this minority group is quite different from others that they have targeted in the past. Unlike racial and ethnic minorities, people with disabilities are more difficult to target. They do not as readily congregate in groups. With few exceptions, you are unlikely to find high concentrations of people with disabilities in particular neighborhoods, churches, cultural organizations, etc. Similarly, particularly on a local level, there are few media sources (magazines, TV programs, radio shows, etc.) that effectively reach a broad audience within the disability community.Given that, how can your company develop a strategic recruiting program that will enable you to successfully attract applicants with disabilities? A truly successful recruiting program is going to be a multi-faceted one. While there isn’t a proscribed “recipe for success”, there are many ingredients that are typically a part of successful programs – and we will describe them here. Which ones you choose to use (and what proportions you choose to use them in) will be determined by your own resources, commitment and creative planning!

Generation Y in Workplace Generation Y in Workplace Presentation Transcript

  • how to attract and retain the “young & the restless” (generation Y)
    Myra Golden
  • Veterans (1922 – 1943) “radio”
    Outlook: practical
    Work ethic: dedicated
    View of authority: respectful
    Leadership by: hierarchy
    Relationships: personal sacrifice
    Perspective: civic
    Compelling Messages of Their Formative Era:
    Make do or do without
    Stay in line
    Sacrifice
    Be heroic
    Consider the common good
  • Baby boomers (1943 - 1960) “Television”
    Outlook: optimistic
    Work ethic: driven
    View of authority: love/hate
    Leadership by: consensus
    Relationships: gratification
    Perspective: team
    Compelling Messages of Their Formative Era:
    Be anything you want to be
    Change the world
    Work well with others
    Live up to the expectation
    Duck and cover
  • Generation x (1960 - 1980) “computer”
    Outlook: skeptical
    Work ethic: balanced
    View of authority: unimpressed
    Leadership by: competence
    Relationships: reluctant to commit
    Perspective: self
    Compelling Messages of Their Formative Era:
    Don’t count on it
    Remember – heroes…aren’t
    Get real
    Survive- staying alive
    Ask “why?”
  • Generation Y (1980 -) “Internet”
    Outlook: hopeful
    Work ethic: ambitious
    View of authority: relaxed, polite
    Leadership by: collaboration
    Relationships: loyal
    Perspective: civic
    Compelling Messages of Their Formative Era:
    Be smart – you are special
    Leave no one behind
    Connect 24/7
    Achieve now!
    Serve your community
  • How to change the face of your workplace
    Moving into a Generation Y Workplace as Baby Boomers Retire
  • A closer look at generation y
  • The Generation y personality
    Don’t expect to stay in a job too long
    Believe in their own self worth
    Expect constant recognition and feedback
    Technically savvy
    Work/life balance is not a buzz word
  • The Generation y personality
    Focus on children & family
    Scheduled, structured lives
    Connected
    Inclusive
    Civic minded
    Goal oriented
  • What Generation y needs from you
    Fair and direct
    Engaged in their professional development
    Training in people skills
    Training to increase their marketability
  • What Yers value in the workplace
    Positive relationships with colleagues
    Attractive salaries
    Exposure to challenging assignments
    Opportunities to expand skills and knowledge
    Flexibility in work schedule
  • The 7 gen y retention strategies
    Be direct and ethical
    Develop individualized career tracks
    Equip them with the latest technology
  • The 7 gen y retention strategies
    Support their values, individuality and self expression
    Provide adequate training
    Offer mentoring support and thorough feedback
    Convey how their work affects the bottom line
  • 6 ways to remain attractive to yers
    Be available, but give them room
    Tell them the “why”
    Let them be problem solvers
  • 6 ways to remain attractive to yers
    Provide a life-work balance workplace
    Don’t be authoritative or paternal
    Encourage them
  • Bridging the gap
    Create Intergenerational Teams
    Veterans enjoy mentoring and Ys are typically eager for mentoring
    Boomers, Xers, and Ys are strong collaborators
  • Bridging the gap
    All interested in learning
    Ys used to and want instant feedback
    Teaming Xers and Ys
    All looking for flexibility in today’s workplace
    All value meaningful work
  • “If people would believe in us like Special Olympics and see what we can do, they would be amazed. My ambition in life is to turn ‘no’ into ‘yes.’  If someone says I can’t do something, I want to prove I can.”
    Suzanne O’Moore, Special Olympics athlete
  • Top 6 Ways to Be Inclusive in Your Recruitment
    Establish partnerships (i.e. Sponsor a Special Olympics event)
    Use government organizations and job boards
    Utilize peer and family connections
    State “People with disabilities encouraged to apply” in your ads
    List only job requirements that are absolutely essential
    Consider a 1-2 week job trial
  • Resources for hiring disabled workers
    EarnWorks.com - Business Case for Hiring Disabled Workers http://www.earnworks.com/BusinessCase/roi_level2asp
    Office of Disability Employment Policy - U.S. Department of Labor Resources http://www.dol.gov/odep/
    Recruiters Network - Career sites for the disabled. http://www.recruitersnetwork.com
    Career Search Opportunities - Job search, resume database for both employers and disabled candidates. http://www.newmobility.com
    President's Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities - The "grandaddy" of all sites for employment of people with disabilities. It hosts a list of over 80 employers who are actively recruiting disabled workers. Some of these employers may be your competitors. Consider participating in this recruiting program yourself. http://www50.pcepd.gov/pcepd
  • Business EDUCATION
    Without EXECUTION
    Is just ENTERTAINMENT