If you are the parent of an online child, especially a child who is old enough to be onlineunsupervised, then you have pro...
If a child does not want to agree to these rules, then a parent does not have to allow a child tohave any kind of online a...
Learn the basics first   how to give your child the right amount of online privacy.
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Learn the basics first how to give your child the right amount of online privacy.

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Whether you're a personal wanting for additional or less exposure on-line, or a business person
looking to manage and monitor what is being said on-line, we have all solutions for you. Want to
observe what is being said on-line for you and your family or especially for your kids? Don’t worry,
we cover all of them! Full info about us:
http://securitycenteronline.com/7557/20034/pdf

Published in: Self Improvement, Technology
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Learn the basics first how to give your child the right amount of online privacy.

  1. 1. If you are the parent of an online child, especially a child who is old enough to be onlineunsupervised, then you have probably had at least a few disagreements over how much youshould know about your childs online activities. While the details are different for every family, itbasically boils down to the child wanting parents to have as little parental access as possible andparents wanting to have as much as they feel is necessary.The Role of the ParentIn the book "Parenting and the Internet" (Speedbrake Publishing, 2007) the basic philosophy isthat parents are the leaders and the rule makers when it comes to the limits of what children cando online, but they also have a responsibility to lead children toward independence. To do this, aparent is obligated to at least oversee what a child is doing online. To do that, parents need tohave the ability to access anything that a child is doing online without having to wait for a childspermission to do so.What Does Privacy Mean for Parents Because of the role a parent plays in a childsdevelopment, parent has to know quite a bit about a childs personal life. Few parents would havethe desire to monitor every aspect of a childs life, especially a childs online activities. However,most parents would think it was appropriate to become very involved if their child were in somekind of problem situation and reviewing the childs online activities might relieve the situation.Secrecy Is Not the Same as PrivacyVery often a childs concept of online privacy means being able to do things without parentalinterference and with the parents only able to access an online account with the childspermission. The reality for most parents is that privacy has limits and that in some cases a childsprivacy is a secondary consideration. One easy to understand analogy is that of a childs diary.Imagine that your child has one of those diaries with a small lock. It allows a level of privacybecause the lock will keep siblings and parents from casually looking at the diarys content.However, a parent would feel justified in picking that lock and reading the contents in order to dealwith a situation where the child was at risk for harm.Setting Rules for Online PrivacyA reasonable set of rules that balance a childs desire to have privacy with a parents need to lookafter a childs needs would probably include an understanding that a child needs to have at leastsome online privacy, along with an understanding that a parents responsibilities are moreimportant than a childs privacy. The following set of rules would be consistent with this set ofunderstandings:* Parents make the rules when it comes to using the computer and the Internet.* Parents should respect a childs privacy, but they also need to know every password, user name,or screen name of every online account or service that a child uses.* Everyone should do their best to protect their personal privacy and the privacy of others.
  2. 2. If a child does not want to agree to these rules, then a parent does not have to allow a child tohave any kind of online account that needs a user name and password. This is not different thanthe kinds of computer use rules that a child may see at their school, library, or community center.The consequence of not agreeing to play by the rules would be that a child would not have accessto the computers.Additional ResourcesAn additional resource that may help you manage family privacy issues is the Family Forms Packfrom Speedbrake Publishing. This downloadable document at http://forms.speedbrake.com/contains several forms that you can use to help manage your familys online activities. Includedare sample family Internet use agreements that include several suggested rules that deal withonline privacy and children. There is also a form that you can use to record user names andpasswords.Dr. Todd Curtis is the creator of the webs most popular airline safety site AirSafe.com(http://www.airsafe.com), the director of the AirSafe.com Foundation, and an expert in the areas ofengineering risk assessment and risk management. He has applied those basic principles to theproblem of managing Internet use, and has put many of those insights and lessons learned intohis book Parenting and the Internet (Speedbrake Publishing, 2007), an easy to understand how-toguide that parents can use to manage the activities of their online children. For more informationabout the book and how it can help you, visit http://books.speedbrake.comArticle Source:http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Todd_Curtis,_PhD==== ====Whether youre a personal wanting for additional or less exposure on-line, or a business personlooking to manage and monitor what is being said on-line, we have all solutions for you. Want toobserve what is being said on-line for you and your family or especially for your kids? Don’t worry,we cover all of them! Full info about us:http://securitycenteronline.com/7557/20034/pdf==== ====

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