Please continue for slide show on correct bike posture.Allan and Jeff climbing Col de Portillon, French Pyrenees.
Correct Posture on the Bike =►       Maximum power output►       Maximum endurance►       Maximum efficiency►       Maximu...
Leverage                  produces                                                                  Power  produces       ...
Which is the correct posture of the two?Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
Correct posture is a function of:                                           • Pelvis position (note: pelvis position dicta...
Incorrect posture is a function of:                                               • Insufficient forward tilt of pelvis ! ...
Muscles of the “Core” are key to maintaining posture.They are the muscles you use to sustain the low back and pelvis in th...
Muscles that extend the hip:           Hamstrings                                                Glutes…all three hamstrin...
Extended backCore disengaged                              Core engaged                                 Flat backBackward t...
Incorrect posture ( hands in drops )                   Correct posture ( hands in drops )                      Flexed back...
Incorrect posture ( hands on hoods )                    Correct posture ( hands on hoods )                      Flexed bac...
Incorrect posture                                          Correct posture                                          Backwa...
Extended back                                                        Forward tilted                                       ...
Better back                                                   position…more neutralPoor posture. Flexedlow back         Al...
Better back                      Flexed low back     position…more neutralAllan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraini...
Flexed low back                                     Flexed low back      Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestrainin...
Flexed low back; tight hamstrings prevent         Better low back position…more neutral. Goodfurther forward tilt of pelvi...
What to work on to develop better posture:• Improve flexibility of hamstrings                  Correct Posture on the Bike...
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Good Bike Posture with Core Engaged

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Good Bike Posture with Core Engaged

  1. 1. Please continue for slide show on correct bike posture.Allan and Jeff climbing Col de Portillon, French Pyrenees.
  2. 2. Correct Posture on the Bike =► Maximum power output► Maximum endurance► Maximum efficiency► Maximum satisfactionAllan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  3. 3. Leverage produces Power produces StabilityCorrectPosture produces produces Efficiency Endurance Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  4. 4. Which is the correct posture of the two?Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  5. 5. Correct posture is a function of: • Pelvis position (note: pelvis position dictates spine position) • Lumbar and thoracic spine position • Shoulder position …which allows for: Pelvis • Maximum hip extensor muscle use • Core stabilization • Eliminates low back discomfort • Eliminates shoulder - arm - hand discomfortAllan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  6. 6. Incorrect posture is a function of: • Insufficient forward tilt of pelvis ! • Flexed lower back • Poor engagement of core muscles …which causes : • Reduced hip extensor muscle use • Low back discomfort & shoulders – arms - hands • Poor stabilization and loss of power deliveryBetter position Wrong position • Result: more fatigue and less power Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  7. 7. Muscles of the “Core” are key to maintaining posture.They are the muscles you use to sustain the low back and pelvis in theiroptimal position. Think of them as “stabilizing” muscles. Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  8. 8. Muscles that extend the hip: Hamstrings Glutes…all three hamstring have origins from Ischial Tuberosity Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  9. 9. Extended backCore disengaged Core engaged Flat backBackward tilted pelvis Forward tilted pelvisAllan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  10. 10. Incorrect posture ( hands in drops ) Correct posture ( hands in drops ) Flexed back Backward tilted Extended back Forward tilted pelvis pelvis Adducted & retracted shoulders Abducted & protracted shoulders Core engaged• Under loaded glutes and hamstrings = loss power. • Loaded glutes and hamstrings = increased power.• Low back and shoulder fatigue – hyper extended neck. • Low back and shoulder relief – neutral neck.• Increased weight bearing in hands. • Decreased weight bearing in hands.• Poor core stabilization = loss power. • Proper core stabilization = increased power. Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  11. 11. Incorrect posture ( hands on hoods ) Correct posture ( hands on hoods ) Flexed back Backward tilted Extended back pelvis Adducted & retracted shoulders Abducted & protracted shoulders Core engaged Forward tilted pelvis• Under loaded glutes and hamstrings = loss power. • Loaded glutes and hamstrings = increased power.• Low back and shoulder fatigue – hyper extended neck. • Low back and shoulder relief – neutral neck.• Increased weight bearing in hands. • Decreased weight bearing in hands.• Poor core stabilization = loss power. • Proper core stabilization = increased power. Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  12. 12. Incorrect posture Correct posture Backward tilted Extended back Flexed back pelvis Forward tilted pelvis Adducted & retracted Abducted & protracted shoulders shoulders• Under loaded glutes and hamstrings = loss power. • Loaded glutes and hamstrings = increased power.• Low back and shoulder fatigue – hyper extended neck. • Low back and shoulder relief – neutral neck.• Increased weight bearing in hands. • Decreased weight bearing in hands.• Poor core stabilization = loss power. • Proper core stabilization = increased power. Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  13. 13. Extended back Forward tilted pelvis Core engagedAllan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  14. 14. Better back position…more neutralPoor posture. Flexedlow back Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  15. 15. Better back Flexed low back position…more neutralAllan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  16. 16. Flexed low back Flexed low back Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  17. 17. Flexed low back; tight hamstrings prevent Better low back position…more neutral. Goodfurther forward tilt of pelvis flexibility of hamstrings and glutes which allows for forward tilt of pelvis. Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
  18. 18. What to work on to develop better posture:• Improve flexibility of hamstrings Correct Posture on the Bike: and gluteus muscles to allow for forward tilt of the pelvis and ► Maximum power output extension of the back. ► Maximum endurance• Address issue of groin pressure to allow for improved forward ► Maximum efficiency pelvic tilt. ► Maximum satisfaction• Improve core function and strength. The End Allan Reeves: Lostende Fitness, www.reevestraining.com, www.francefrominside.com
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