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Powerpoint for Objective 3.02

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    Career research power_point_1.1.2.g1 Career research power_point_1.1.2.g1 Presentation Transcript

    • Career Research 1.1.2 Family Economics and Financial Education Take Charge of Your Finances
    • Making an informed Career Decision
      • Includes a self evaluation of interests
      • Making future career projections
      • Selecting personal goals
        • Goals are the end result of something a person intends to acquire, achieve, do, reach, or accomplish sometime in the near or distant future
          • Short-term goals are accomplished within one year
          • Long-term goals are accomplished in more then one year
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    • Career vs. Job
      • What is the difference between a job and a career?
      • Career
        • A commitment to a profession which requires continued training and offers a clear path for occupational growth
        • Example: Educator
      • Job
        • An employment position obtained mainly to earn money
        • Example: Gas Station Attendant
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    • Job Opportunities
      • Pick a career path with job opportunities in the future
      • Three main factors influencing future job opportunities
        • Population
        • Labor force
        • Demand for goods and services
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    • Factors
      • Population affects the size of the labor force
        • Affects the quantity of goods produced
      • Demand for goods and services determines employment within industries
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    • Resources
      • Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook
        • www.bls.gov
      • For hundreds of different jobs the handbook tells you:
        • The training and education needed
        • Earnings
        • Expected job prospects
        • What workers do on the job
        • Working conditions
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    • Education training © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    • Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
    • Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
    • Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
    • Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
    • Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
    • Fact
      • Among the 20 fastest growing occupations, a bachelor’s or associate degree is the most significant source of postsecondary education or training for 12 of them!
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
      • Healthcare occupations comprise 12 of the 20 fastest growing occupations
      Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
      • Computer occupations account for 5 out of the 20 fastest growing occupations
      Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
    • Occupations projected to Grow Fastest, 2004-2014
      • In groups of 2-3 hypothesize why health care positions and computer/technology positions are growing so fast
      • These combined jobs will add more than 1.8 million new jobs
      Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
      • Increases in employment: health education, sales, transportation, office
      • and administrative support, and food service
    • Job Declines projected 2004-2014
      • Declining occupational employment stems from:
        • declining industry employment
        • technological advancements
        • changes in business practices
      • The majority of declines are office and administrative support and production occupations
        • Increasing plant and factory automation
        • Implementation of office technology
    • Job Declines in Occupations with the largest numerical decreases in Employment, projected 2004-2014
    • Researching a Career
      • Questions that you should ask:
        • Are there opportunities for advancement?
        • What are the educational requirements?
        • Does it pay enough?
        • What are the working conditions?
      © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona