WELCOME!
HECA Conference
Cyndy McDonald
Visalia, CA
Adapted from a presentation by the AVID Network of
Los Angeles County Office of Education
Counseling
Under-Represented
Stu...
A CALL FOR ACTION IN US-
 Minority Students
 Low Income Students
 Immigrant Students
 Other underserved students
“ Cal...
What was your
educational journey?
WHO WERE THE ROLE MODELS IN YOUR LIFE?
• Parent, Grandparent or teacher that was important in
your life for setting an exa...
WHAT DO WE KNOW
ABOUT COLLEGE
ACCESS?
What Does the
Research Show?
1. A Collaborative Research Project with UCLA’s Graduate
School of Education & Information Studies, The
Achievement Counci...
1. COLLEGE TALK
 Clear, ongoing communication about
what it takes
 Create a college-going identity among
students
 Facu...
2. CLEAR EXPECTATIONS
 Explicit goals of college preparation must be
defined
 Goals must be communicated
consistently, c...
3. INFORMATION & RESOURCES
 Students must have access to up-to-date,
comprehensive college information
 Counselors may h...
3. INDICATORS:
INFORMATION & RESOURCES
Existence and visibility of:
 College-related periodicals
 PSAT/SAT/ACT materials...
4. COMPREHENSIVE COUNSELING MODEL
 All counselors are college counselors
 All student interactions with
counselors are c...
5. TESTING & CURRICULUM
 Students must have knowledge and
awareness of necessary tests
 Students must be given the oppor...
6. FACULTY INVOLVEMENT
 Faculty must be active partners
 Faculty must be kept up-to-date on college
knowledge
 Professi...
7. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
 Parents as informed partners
 Parents must have opportunities to gain
knowledge and recognize t...
7. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT
 Frequency and nature of counselor
interactions with parents
 Number of planned events for paren...
8. COLLEGE PARTNERSHIPS
 Active links between school and local
colleges and universities
 Field trips
 College fairs
 ...
9. ARTICULATION
 Students should have a seamless
experience from Kindergarten
through HS graduation
 Ongoing communicati...
IN SUMMARY
 Students are directly affected by their educational
environments- at all grade levels, k- college
 Teachers,...
By touching the life
of a student
you are touching the
lives
of future generations
Counseling Under-Represented Students: How to Create  a College Going Culture
Counseling Under-Represented Students: How to Create  a College Going Culture
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Counseling Under-Represented Students: How to Create a College Going Culture

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Counseling
Under-Represented
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How to Create
a College Going Culture

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Counseling Under-Represented Students: How to Create a College Going Culture

  1. 1. WELCOME! HECA Conference Cyndy McDonald Visalia, CA
  2. 2. Adapted from a presentation by the AVID Network of Los Angeles County Office of Education Counseling Under-Represented Students: How to Create a College Going Culture
  3. 3. A CALL FOR ACTION IN US-  Minority Students  Low Income Students  Immigrant Students  Other underserved students “ Call to action to improve college access and success for underserved students.”
  4. 4. What was your educational journey?
  5. 5. WHO WERE THE ROLE MODELS IN YOUR LIFE? • Parent, Grandparent or teacher that was important in your life for setting an example in terms of education • Great Grand-parent attended college • Grand parent attended college • Parent attended college • Both Parents graduated from high school • First in family to graduate from college
  6. 6. WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT COLLEGE ACCESS? What Does the Research Show?
  7. 7. 1. A Collaborative Research Project with UCLA’s Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, The Achievement Council, and 27 schools in LAUD in 2000- 2001 (www.gseis.ucla.edu - Identified 9 principles schools can use to create a college going culture 2. Pathways to College Network- an alliance of national organizations and funders dedicated to improving college access for underserved students (www.pathwaystocollege.net) -Synthesized numerous studies -Identified 6 core principles to guide actions of LEADERS in all sectors of society TWO RESOURCES TO USE:
  8. 8. 1. COLLEGE TALK  Clear, ongoing communication about what it takes  Create a college-going identity among students  Faculty, administrators must share own experiences  Reveal assumptions about roles
  9. 9. 2. CLEAR EXPECTATIONS  Explicit goals of college preparation must be defined  Goals must be communicated consistently, clearly, in a variety of ways  Students, parents, teachers, administrators, staff must be aware of their roles in college preparation  Focused mission statement  Existence and consistency of four-year plans for students  Frequency and nature of communications with students about their educational attainment
  10. 10. 3. INFORMATION & RESOURCES  Students must have access to up-to-date, comprehensive college information  Counselors may have primary responsibility, but use of this information must extend beyond counseling office
  11. 11. 3. INDICATORS: INFORMATION & RESOURCES Existence and visibility of:  College-related periodicals  PSAT/SAT/ACT materials  Financial Aid materials  College catalogs  College choice guides  Links to internet resources on college planning  Career guides
  12. 12. 4. COMPREHENSIVE COUNSELING MODEL  All counselors are college counselors  All student interactions with counselors are college counseling opportunities  All decisions about students’ coursework and career futures are made with a full range of options in mind  Professional development activities related to college that counselors attend
  13. 13. 5. TESTING & CURRICULUM  Students must have knowledge and awareness of necessary tests  Students must be given the opportunity to prepare for these tests  Testing fees must be taken into account  Students must have access to all necessary coursework
  14. 14. 6. FACULTY INVOLVEMENT  Faculty must be active partners  Faculty must be kept up-to-date on college knowledge  Professional development opportunities must be available  College Talk in the classroom  Parental connections
  15. 15. 7. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT  Parents as informed partners  Parents must have opportunities to gain knowledge and recognize their role  Parents must have access to faculty, counseling staff
  16. 16. 7. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT  Frequency and nature of counselor interactions with parents  Number of planned events for parents (and other opportunities for involvement)  Types and amount of information available to parents related to college  Frequency of field trips for parents to college (and who takes part)
  17. 17. 8. COLLEGE PARTNERSHIPS  Active links between school and local colleges and universities  Field trips  College fairs  Academic enrichment programs
  18. 18. 9. ARTICULATION  Students should have a seamless experience from Kindergarten through HS graduation  Ongoing communication among all schools in a feeder group  Work at one school site should connect with activities at other levels
  19. 19. IN SUMMARY  Students are directly affected by their educational environments- at all grade levels, k- college  Teachers, staff & INDEPENDENT CONSULTANTS or others may not realize their potential for positive impact on student lives  By beginning now to address the principles that comprise a “college going culture” IEC’s and schools can help first generation and under-represented students attain their full potential through receiving a higher education  Contact cyndy@mycca.net for handouts/more information on this topic
  20. 20. By touching the life of a student you are touching the lives of future generations

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