The day in the life of a prisoner
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The day in the life of a prisoner

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  • More clips to watch if time: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7648718.stm http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17068284
  • More clips to watch if time: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7648718.stm http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-17068284

The day in the life of a prisoner The day in the life of a prisoner Presentation Transcript

  • What is prison life like? FACT OR FICTION?1. It costs on average £38000 a year to keep someone in prison3. A third of prisoners have nowhere to live on release5. 75% of criminals sent to prison for the first time commit another offence when they are released7. Prisoners may be allowed to have a computer and games in their cell9. There are approximately 97,000 people in UK prisons11. Unconvicted prisoners can wear their own clothes13. There are only about 5000 women in prison in the UK
  • What is prison life like? FACT OR FICTION?1. It costs on average £38000 a year to keep someone in prison3. A third of prisoners have nowhere to live on release5. first S! commit 75% of criminals sent to prison for the CT time FA another offence when they are released A LL E to have a computer and games7. AR Prisoners may be allowed in their cell EY TH9. There are approximately 97,000 people in UK prisons11. Unconvicted prisoners can wear their own clothes13. There are only about 5000 women in prison in the UK
  • What is prison life like?Fairness and Justice: Human andlegal rights of those arrested and in prison View slide
  • Learning Objectives• To understand the daily routine of life in prison• To explore the rights of prisoners: visits, work and pay, education, personal possessions etc• To be able to explain the challenges faced by the prison system View slide
  • b) Explain threereasons why people may say prison is too lenient (6 marks) c) Present a case in favour of making prisons harsher (12 marks)
  • When is prison necessary? For the most serious offences the court may impose a prison, or custodial, sentence.• The length of sentence imposed by the court will be limited by the maximum penalty for that crime.• A custodial sentence can only be imposed if:• the offence is so serious that only a custodial sentence can be justified;• the offence is a violent or sexual one and the court believes that only a prison sentence would adequately protect the public; or• the offender refuses to comply with the requirements of a community order.
  • Deciding which prison someone is kept in The type of prison offenders are sent to depends on their crime and sentence. The risk of harm to the public and how likely they are to try and escape is also considered important Prisoners have• Open and Closed Prisons the right to complain if they• Training Prisons think their security category is wrong• High Security Prisons Prison staff can change a prisoners security category if they think the prisons has become safer or more dangerous.
  • Prisoner RightsA prisoner has fewer rights that someone who has not broken the law, but all prisoners have basic legal rights on how they are treated that can’t be taken away1. The right to food and water2. Protection from bullying, violence and racial harassment3. Being able to get in contact with a solicitor ADD TO BOX A
  • Privilege Levels Indicates what can a prisoners do, how many visits can they have each week, what personal property can that have etc All prisoners start on standard privileges The levels were introduced in Based on 1995 with the aim...“to behaviour in prison. Thehigher the more »BASIC encourage responsible behaviour by prisoners; to encourage hard work and privileges they receive e.g. »STANDARD other constructive activity by prisoners; to encourage Increased sentenced prisoners to number oflength of visits. »ENHANCED progress through the prison system; and to create a more disciplined better controlled and safer environment for ADD TO BOX B prisoners and staff.”
  • A day in the life of a prisoner… Education Work: During the day Pay: The rate that classes are inmates are allocated Convicted prisoners get paid is not prisoner must provided duties including sewing T- subject to the minimum including shirts, cleaning prison wage. The average is wear the courses in IT, wings, working in the £9.60 week (30p and hour) clothes the Languages, kitchen Gardening, prison gives Reading, Typical Prison Routine: them includingWriting, Maths. underwear Prisoners can •7.30 and socks obtain Breakfast qualification •8.30 Work or education Unconvictedsuch as GCSEs •11.30 Lunch and lock up in cell prisoners may •1.30 Return to work/education wear their own Association= •4.30 clothes unless‘leisure’ time out Finish work and return to cell area of cells. This is •5.30 Dinner and lock up they are a the time that •6.30 Association/education/group work category A prisoners can •8.30 Lock up for the night prisoner, onmake phone calls the way toSome prisons do not have If you are on court or likely enough education or remand you are to escapework places for everyone allowed three so some prisoners are All prisoners should be weekly visits fromlocked up for most of the able to spend between friends and family. If day only being allowed you are convicted 30 minutes to an hour you are allowedout to use the telephone, outside in the open air visits or collect meals fewer each day
  • Life inside: Watch and listenhttp://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/7444313. stm1. Where does he work?2. How much does he get paid?3. What does he spend it on?4. What does he have in his cell? ADD TO BOX C
  • What happens if a prisoner breaks the rulesA prisoner who breaks prison rules - for example by assaulting someone or having a banned item in their cell - is normally punished. The punishment will depend on the offence.• Kept in their cell for up to 21 days (adults) or ten days (young offenders)• Given up to 42 extra days in prison on top of their original sentence• The prison can also take away the prisoner’s privileges by: stopping extravisits from family and friends, removing a TV from their cell, deducting paythe prisoner earns working in the prison
  • What do you think?• Should prisoners have access to TV’s, games consoles etc?• Should prisoners receive minimum wage for the work that they do?• How does educating prisoners fit with the purpose of prisons in the UK?• What are the benefits of keeping prisoners occupied throughout the day?• Do we have a responsibility to provide opportunities for prisoners?
  • The Ministry ofJustice predicts by2015 there will be 93,900 people in prison in England and WalesHow effective are our prisons?
  • b) Explain threereasons why people may say prison is too lenient (6 marks) c) Present a case in favour of making prisons harsher (12 marks)