Real World Math (Packet for Home)

751 views
528 views

Published on

real world math

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
751
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
11
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Real World Math (Packet for Home)

  1. 1. 3 Real World Math Activities to Support Instruction at Home Activities include: • Balancing a checkbook/bank account • Grocery Shopping • Percents (Calculating coupons and discounts) • Measurement (Following a recipe) Mrs. Winfield-Corbett’s Class
  2. 2.  
  3. 3. © 2011 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated Building Understanding and Excitement for Children Need to go food shop- ping? Why not turn it into an opportunity for your child to practice what he’s learning in math. Here are some ideas. Weigh and multiply. Fruits and vegetables are often sold by the pound. Ask your youngster to compute how much your produce will cost. For example, say you want 6 bananas and they cost 49 cents a pound. He would weigh them and multiply their weight by the cost per pound (2 lb. x 49 cents = 98 cents) to get the total cost. Comparison shop. Let your child help you save money and learn to be a better consumer. Ask him to read unit-pricing labels on shelves to find the best value (8 cents per ounce for one brand of pasta sauce vs. 13 cents per ounce for another brand). Or he can look for the better deal: one box of cereal for $2.79 Habitat for rent Help your child think about what animals need to survive (shelter, food, water). Then, have her choose an animal (monkey) and write a classified ad for a home that will meet its needs. Example: “Tall tree in a tropical rain forest. Large river nearby for drinking. Plenty of leaves, fruit, and insects to eat.” Counting practice Have your youngster practice count- ing by 10s—but start at a number that doesn’t end in zero. For instance, begin at 787 and count by 10s (787, 797, 807). Try other numbers, too. Examples: Count by 3s, starting at 52 (52, 55, 58), or by 5s, starting at 92 (92, 97, 102). Book picks Hotel Infinity is fully booked, but there’s always room for more. Read The Cat in Numberland (Ivar Ekeland) for a clever introduction to infinity. Learning about the solar system is fun when planets tell the story them- selves. Dan Green’s Astronomy: Out of This World! contains fascinating facts and details along with cartoon illus- trations your child is sure to love. Worth quoting “Wondering is the seed of genius.” William Mocca Q: Why did the man water only half of his lawn? A: Because he heard there was a 50 per- cent chance of rain. Math at the grocery store info bits Just for fun Look at me! Help your youngster learn about the science of optics with this mealtime activity. Have her look at herself in a clean spoon. What happens if she looks in the bowl of the spoon? (She’s upside down.) What happens on the other side? (She’s right side up.) Next, have her bring her finger toward the spoon and watch what happens on each side. The bowl (the concave side) will magnify her finger, or make it look larger. The back (the convex side) will make her finger look smaller. Ask your child how scientists might use this information to make eyeglasses, cameras, or telescopes. Tip: She can remember which side is which by thinking of concave as “caves in.” or two boxes for $5? ($5 ÷ 2 = $2.50 per box, so you’ll save money buying two boxes and storing one for later.) Estimate the total. Ask your youngster to predict your total bill by keeping track of what you put in your cart. With each item, he should check the price and round it up or down to the nearest dol- lar. As you go, he can keep a running tally on paper, in his head, or on a calcu- lator. At checkout time, see how close he came.
  4. 4. © 2011 Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated To provide busy parents with practical ways to promote their children’s math and science skills. Resources for Educators, a division of CCH Incorporated 128 N. Royal Avenue • Front Royal, VA 22630 540-636-4280 • rfecustomer@wolterskluwer.com www.rfeonline.com O u r P u r p o s e Page 2Intermediate Edition What’s the angle? Learning about angles is an important step in understanding geometry. Try these suggestions with your youngster: ●● Help her use her arms to demonstrate angles. For a right angle, she can stretch her left arm straight up and her right arm straight out to her side. An acute angle is smaller, so have her move her arms closer together. And an obtuse angle is larger than a right angle, so she should move her arms wider. ●● Next, see how many angles your child can find in the alpha- bet. Have her print all 26 uppercase letters on a large sheet of paper. With different-colored markers, have her mark right angles (one in “L,” for exam- ple), acute angles (three in “A”), and obtuse angles (two in “X”). ●● Together, look for angles in the real world. Right angles will be easiest to find—they’ll be in corners of rooms where one wall meets another, on window frames, or at the edge of a square sandbox. But your youngster will also be able to find angles that are acute (spokes in a bicycle wheel) and obtuse (a door that’s wide open). Suggest that she make a three-column chart (name of object, type of angle, sketch of the angle) to record her findings. How many times can your youngster fold a piece of paper in half? She will find out with this sur- prising activity.  Give her a piece of notebook paper, and ask her to predict how many times she can fold it in half. Then, have her test her prediction by folding the paper in half again and again until it won’t fold anymore. She’ll dis- cover she can’t fold it more than 6 times. Learning math words My son Kaiden struggles with vocabulary. And since he’s learning so many new math words this year, like circumference and integer, this problem was affecting his math work. I talked to Kaiden’s teacher, and she thought it would help to post the words where he could see them. She suggested that he write each word on an index card and illustrate it. Kaiden and I talked about what each word reminds him of. For instance, car tires help him remem- ber that circumference is the distance around a circle, so he drew a car with tires on his circumference card. We hung the cards on the refrigerator so he could see the words every day. Once he masters a word, we take it down and add it to a pile on the counter. By associating the math words with some- thing meaningful to him, he has been able to remember them more easily in class. And watching his stack of words grow seems to be giving him confidence. Save your breath Your child can inflate a balloon without using his breath. A chemical reaction will do the job for him! You’ll need: empty plastic soda bottle (20 fl. oz.), 1 –4 cup water, 1 tsp. baking soda, uninflated balloon, lemon juice Here’s how: Have your youngster add the water and baking soda to the bottle, close the cap, and swirl it around until the water is cloudy. Then, help him stretch out the balloon and place the opening over the top of the bottle, leaving a small space. He should very quickly add a squirt of lemon juice, seal the balloon com- pletely over the bottle, and shake lightly. What happens? The balloon inflates. Why? When you mix an acid (lemon juice) with a base (baking soda), they create carbon dioxide. The molecules spread out as the gas forms, pushing against the walls of the balloon and causing it to inflate. Paper folding Have her try again with different sizes and types of paper (tissue paper, paper towel, newspaper). No matter the size or kind of paper, she won’t be able to fold it more than 6, 7, or 8 times. Ask your child if she can figure out why. Hint: It has to do with doubling. The first time she folds the paper, she’ll have 2 layers. The next time, 4 layers, and so on…until 8 folds = 256 layers. The paper simply becomes too thick to fold again. parent to Parent SCIENCE LAB MATH corner
  5. 5. keeping a running balance www.practicalmoneyskills.com using banking services activity 6-3a name:____________________________________________________________ date: ______________________ Directions: Record checks, a check card payment, an ATM transaction and a deposit in the checkbook register below. Include the date, description, and amount of each entry. Calculate the balance. 1. May 26: write beginning balance of $527.96. 2. May 27: write check #107 to Mrs. Wilson. You pay your landlord your share of the rent payment: $225.00. 3. May 28: make a check card payment to Foodland. You pay $22.52 for groceries. 4. June 1: write check #108 to Bank of Illinois. You make a car payment of $165.23. 5. June 2: write check #109 to Interstate Phone Service for $62.77. 6. June 2: use your ATM card to withdraw $20.00. 7. June 15: you deposit your paycheck for $425.00. Write this amount in the DEPOSIT column. CHECK DATE DESCRIPTION TRANSACTION DEPOSIT BALANCE NO. AMOUNT AMOUNT
  6. 6. keeping a running balance www.practicalmoneyskills.com using banking services activity 6-3a cont. name:____________________________________________________________ date: ______________________ Directions: Use the check register you just completed to answer the questions: 1. What was your account balance on May 30? _______________________ 2. Your favorite band just released a new CD. It costs $21.00. Can you afford to buy the CD on June 3? What will your account balance be if you do? _______________________ 3. You find a leather jacket on sale for $189.00. Can you afford to buy the jacket on June 16? What will your account balance be if you do? _______________________ 4. What was the amount of check #109? Who was it payable to? _______________________
  7. 7. keeping a running balance www.practicalmoneyskills.com using banking services activity key 6-3a cont. name:____________________________________________________________ date: ______________________ Directions: Use the check register you just completed to answer the questions: 1. What was your account balance on May 30? * $280.44 2. Your favorite band just released a new CD. It costs $21.00. Can you afford to buy the CD on June 3? What will your account balance be if you do? * Yes—$11.44 3. You find a leather jacket on sale for $189.00. Can you afford to buy the jacket on June 16? What will your account balance be if you do? * Yes—$268.44 4. What was the amount of check #109? Who was it payable to? * $62.77 to Interstate Phone Service
  8. 8. ©Learning ZoneXpress • www.learningzonexpress.com P.O. Box 1022, Owatonna, MN 55060 • 888-455-7003 Reading a Recipe Read the following recipe for oatmeal cookies. • Rewrite the recipe to double it (using correct abbreviations). • List the equipment needed to make the recipe. AWESOME OATMEAL COOKIES Ingredients Double Recipe Equipment List 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup butter, softened 1/2 cup brown sugar, packed 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1 large egg 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 1/2 cups rolled oats 3/4 cup raisins 3/4 cup chocolate chips Recipe Directions: 1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly grease two baking sheets. 2. Cream butter and sugars together until light and fluffy, using an electric mixer set on medium-high speed. 3. Add the egg and mix until combined. Stir in the vanilla extract. 4. Stir together the dry ingredients (flour, baking powder, and salt) in a separate bowl. With the mixer set on a low speed or using a wooden spoon, gradually add the dry ingredients to creamy mixture until combined. Stir in rolled oats. 5. Divide the batter in half. Stir the raisins into one half and the chocolate chips into the other. 6. Drop the dough by rounded tablespoonfuls onto the baking sheets (leave about 3 inches between each one for spreading). Flatten each cookie slightly with the back of the spoon. 7. Bake 1 or 2 baking sheets at a time for 10 to 13 minutes (check for doneness after 10 minutes). The cookies are done when they are lightly browned around the edges. 8. Remove the baking sheets to a wire rack and let the cookies cool for about 2 minutes. Using a metal spatula, remove the cookies to wire racks to cool completely. Store in an airtight container.
  9. 9. Kitchen Math Workbook 6 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook6 The Food Budget #1 Addition and subtraction A budget is a plan for spending money. Many people plan how much money they want to spend for food each week. They try not to spend more than the amount in their budget. Example: Mary Rose’s food budget is $175 per week. So far she has spent $101. Problem: How much does she have left for the rest of the week? Solution: Amount in budget: $175 Subtract the amount spent – 1. Tony planned to spend $100 for food this week. On Monday he spent $22 and on Thursday he spent $52. How much money does he have left for the week? ____________________ 101 $74 She has $74 left. Directions: Answer the questions below. 2. Kate’s food budget for the month is $700. The first week she spent $189, the second week she spent $200 and the third week she spent $150. How much did she spend? ___________ How much does she have left for the last week? __________ 3. Last week Karen spent $121.35 on food for her family. She only has $200 to spend every two weeks. How much does she have left to spend? __________ 4. Mike and Lisa try not to spend more than $150 per week on groceries (including going out to eat). Mike spent $84 on groceries and Lisa spent $23. They both went out for lunch on Wednesday and spent $30. How much money do they have left for groceries or dining out? ________________
  10. 10. Kitchen Math Workbook 7 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook 7 The Shopping List #2 Multiplication, division and addition Have you ever gone to the grocery store and then forgotten half of the things you wanted to buy? Smart shoppers make a list of what they need to buy before going shopping. A list will help you remember what you need and it will help you avoid buying things that you don’t need. The Northern Store Orange juice $2.19 Cheese slices (one package) $8.95 Frozen pizza $12.99 Parmesan cheese $7.89 Spaghetti noodles $2.99 Cereal $6.99 12 grain bread $3.49 Container of olive oil $9.59 Ice cream (1 litre) $5.79 Large eggs (1 dozen) $3.99 Low fat milk (2 litres) $4.99 Pork chops (2) $4.98 Chicken breasts (4) $11.98 1 container of yogurt $.99 Directions: Use the prices above and find the total cost of the items on each person’s shopping list. You may need another sheet of paper to do the problems. The first one is done for you. 1. Lisa’s List $ Each Cost 2 pizzas 2 x $12.99 $25.98 1 cereal $6.99 $6.99 2 dozen eggs 2 x $3.99 $7.98 2 packages of cheese 2 x $8.95 $17.90 Total $58.85
  11. 11. Kitchen Math Workbook 8 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook8 2. Jill’s List $ Each Cost 2 orange juice 2 spaghetti noodles 6 pork chops 12 yogurt Total 3. Joe’s List $ Each Cost 1 parmesan cheese 2 litres ice cream 2 loaves of bread 8 chicken breasts Total 4. Mike’s List $ Each Cost 1 olive oil 3 frozen pizzas 4 pork chops 2 spaghetti noodles Total 5. Mary’s List $ Each Cost 2 low fat milk 3 litres of ice cream 2 chicken breasts 3 packages of cheese slices Total
  12. 12. Kitchen Math Workbook 9 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook 9 More on Shopping Lists #3 Multiplication, division and addition Below is a list of food and prices. Use the list to answer the questions below. kilogram (kg) litre (L) 1 dozen = 12 Cheese $7.88/kg Tomatoes $3.89/kg Bananas $1.99/kg Milk $2.49/L Bread $3.79/loaf Oranges $5.99/kg Grapes $4.89/kg Eggs $2.69/dozen Directions: Jack has $65 for grocery shopping. Calculate the total amount of the shopping list below. Does Jack have enough money? The first one is done for you. Quantity of Grocery Item Price Total Running Total 2 kg of tomatoes $3.89/kg $7.78 $7.78 2 kg of oranges $5.99/kg ½ kg of cheese $7.88/kg 3 dozen eggs $2.69/dozen 2 kg of grapes $4.89/kg 2 L of milk $2.49/L 3 loaves of bread $3.79/loaf 4 kg of bananas $1.99/kg
  13. 13. Kitchen Math Workbook 10 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook10 What was the total amount spent on shopping? _____________________ How much money will be left over, or how much more money is needed? ________________________ Does Jack have enough money? ___________________
  14. 14. Kitchen Math Workbook 11 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook 11 Estimating Your Groceries #4 Estimation, multiplication and addition Usually when we go to the grocery store we don’t have a calculator with us. We usually estimate how much things will cost. Part 1: Emily has $60 for grocery shopping. When shopping, Emily estimates the total amount of the groceries. To estimate, round each item to the nearest dollar. Keep track of the running total to see if Emily has enough money. The first one is done for you. Item on list Price per unit Your estimate Estimate running total 3 kg of ground beef $2.69/kg $9.00 $9.00 3 kg of chicken $3.99/kg 5 cartons of juice $2.28/carton 2 kg of bananas $.99/kg 2 packages of butter $3.29/package 3 dozen(12) eggs $2.59/doz 5 kg of potatoes $1.19/kg 2 packages of carrots $3.19/package Calculate the total without estimating. ___________________ What is the difference between the actual and the estimate? ______________________
  15. 15. Kitchen Math Workbook 12 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook12 Part 2: Jacob has $75 for grocery shopping. When shopping, Jacob estimates the total amount of groceries. To estimate, round each item to the nearest dollar. Keep track of the running total to see if Jacob has enough money. The first one is done for you. Item on list Price per unit Your estimate Estimate running total 5 loaves of bread $3.05/loaf $15.00 $15.00 2 kg of apples $3.99/kg 3 boxes of cereal $3.89/box 4 cans of beans $1.29/can 5 cans of pizza sauce $.89/can 4 boxes of macaroni and cheese $1.79/box 4 L of milk $2.69/2L 2 kg of cheese $4.78/kg Calculate the total without estimating. ___________________ What is the difference between the actual and the estimate? ______________________
  16. 16. Kitchen Math Workbook 13 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook 13 Using Coupons #5 Subtraction, multiplication Coupons printed in newspapers and magazines can save you money on food. You need to cut out the coupon and bring it to the store. Give your coupon to the cashier when you pay for the item. Example: This coupon is worth 50 cents off the price of a box of cereal. Problem: How much will you pay for the cereal if you use this coupon? Solution: Find the original price of the cereal. $2.99 Subtract the worth of the coupon. $2.49 You will pay $2.49. ―.50 Part 1: This coupon was printed in the newspaper. Look at the coupon and answer the questions below. 1. What amount of money can this coupon save you? ________________ 2. Does this coupon tell you the price of the item? ________________ 3. Can you use this coupon any time you want? _____________________ Why? _____________________________________ 4. Can you buy as many as you would like? ____________________ Why? ________________________________________ 5. If the regular price is $1.59, what will you pay if you use this coupon? ____________ 6. How much would you pay if you wanted to buy 2 packages? ________________ Save 50¢ Save 75¢ Expires March 31st . Limit 2 per person
  17. 17. Kitchen Math Workbook 14 Shopping for the Kitchen Shopping for the Kitchen Kitchen Math Workbook14 Part 2: This coupon was printed in the newspaper. Look at the coupon and answer the questions below. 7. What amount of money can this coupon save you? ________________ 8. Does this coupon tell you the price of the item? __________________ 9. Can you deduce how much one jar of jam is? ____________________ How much is one jar? ______________________ 10.Can you use this coupon any time you want? _____________________ Why ? _________________________________ 11.Can you buy as many as you would like? ____________________ Why? _________________________ 12.How much would you pay if you took home 2 jars of jam? _________________ 13.How much would you pay if you took home 4 jars of jam? _________________ Buy One Get One Free Save $3.99 Expires May 20th Limit 4 per person
  18. 18. Directions: Choose  3  of  the  following  ac1vi1es.    Each  one  counts  as  20   points  (60  points  total).    If  you  complete  more  than  3,  they  will  count  as   extra  credit.    Put  a  check  beside  the  acEviEes  you  complete.    AHach  all  of   your  acEviEes  to  this  assignment  sheet  and  be  sure  to  include  ALL  of  your   work.   q Find  a  recipe.  Write  down  the  original  recipe.  Double  it  to  serve  twice  as  many   people.  Go  back  to  the  original  recipe  and  cut  it  in  half  to  serve  half  as  many   people.     q Find  a  receipt.  Figure  out  what  the  total  would  have  been  if  the  items  were  on   sale  for  10%  off,  25%  off,  30%  off,  45%  off  and  50%  off.  Figure  out  what  the  total   would  have  been  if  the  sales  tax  in  Michigan  were  9%  (9  cents  on  every  dollar)   instead  of  6%.  Be  sure  to  aHach  the  receipt.       q Find  a  newspaper  or  magazine  arEcle  with  math  in  it.  Read  it  and  write  a  criEcal   response  that  includes  a  brief  summary,  a  descripEon  of  how  math  is  used  in   the  arEcle,  and  your  analysis  of  it.  Here  are  some  quesEons  to  get  you  started:  Is   the  math  used  to  make  a  point?  To  convince  the  reader?  To  provide   informaEon?  To  compare  two  or  more  different  things?  To  entertain?  Are  you   convinced/informed/entertained?  What  informaEon  would  have  been  more   important  to  include?  Be  sure  to  aHach  the  arEcle.     q Pick  three  TV  sitcoms  that  are  the  same  length  of  Eme.  Count  the  number  of   Emes  the  laugh  track  is  used.  Find  the  rate  (how  many  laughs  per  minute)  for   each  show.  Don’t  forget  to  subtract  the  Eme  the  shows  are  in  commercial.  A   half-­‐hour  show  is  rarely  a  full  30  minutes  long.  Be  sure  to  record  the  names  of   the  TV  shows.     q Measure  15  things  around  your  house  and  record  the  measurements  in  a  table.   Include  the  name  of  the  object,  what  you  are  measuring  (height,  width,   diameter,  etc.),  and  the  measurement.  Report  all  of  your  measurements  in  both   English  and  metric  units.  For  example,  if  you  measure  a  pencil  in  inches,  you   should  also  report  the  measurement  in  cenEmeters.  Here  are  some  ideas  to  get   you  started:  the  height  of  a  window,  the  width  of  a  TV  screen,  the  rise  and  tread   of  a  staircase,  the  height  of  your  brother,  the  circumference  of  a  soda  can,  the   diameter  of  a  car’s  Eres,  the  length  of  a  square  on  the  sidewalk,  or  the  depth  of   your  microwave.      
  19. 19. Name  _________________________     Homeroom  _________________________     Date  ______________________   Activity Points Earned Comments Recipe Receipt Article TV Measurement Total /60 Have you… q  AHached  all  acEviEes  and  materials  to  this   paper?   q  Shown  ALL  of  your  work?   q  Checked  off  which  acEviEes  you  did?   q  WriHen  neatly  and  clearly?  

×