Manhattan Kansas Bicycle Master Plan Revision

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Presented at the February 23rd Bicycle Advisory Committee meeting in Manhattan, Kansas. The presentation presents an update to the 1998 Master Plan, recommending that we focus more on the 60% of potential riders who are "interested but scared" by creating a low-traffic, low-speed "green grid" for bicycle commuting.

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Manhattan Kansas Bicycle Master Plan Revision

  1. 1.
  2. 2. Where we are now …<br />Amsterdam = 40% CPH = 33% Davis = 17% Boulder = 12.3% Berkeley 9.9% Portland 5.8%<br />
  3. 3. Missoula, Montana<br />Population 57,000 in 2000, now 69,000+<br />College Town<br />7.2% bicycle mode share<br />64% of arterials with bike lanes <br />
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  11. 11. “The Missoula Model”<br />Retrofit streets to max of 3 lanes<br />Replace traffic signals with single lane roundabouts emphasizing bike/walk<br />Connect all bike lanes, sidewalks, and trails<br />One street per neighborhood = “green street”<br />Max 25 mph speed in city limits<br />Double bus service<br />
  12. 12. 1998 Master Plan<br />Complete Linear Trail<br />Develop inter-city bicycle facilities<br />Bicycle parking<br />Policies for future growth<br />
  13. 13. Types of Cyclists<br />A: operate under most conditions <br />B: casual riders. Prefer low-speed, low-volume streets or paths <br />C: child riders. Require comfortable areas.<br />
  14. 14. 1998 plan for completing the bike network<br />“wheel and spokes” concept<br />“All streets should be accessible to bicycle travel.”<br />“An inter-connected network of designated bicycle routes – spokes – should be developed throughout the community.”<br />“ideally, a rough grid of approximately ¼ - ½ mile spacing”<br />Designated major streets as bicycle routes (College, Browning, Kimball, Poyntz, 14th, Juliette, etc.)<br />
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  16. 16. Ehreth’s 2004 critique of the Master Plan<br />
  17. 17. Curb lane widths under 12 ft.<br />
  18. 18. Topography<br />
  19. 19. Traffic Volume<br />
  20. 20. Traffic Speeds<br />
  21. 21. Expert Observations<br />
  22. 22. Final calculations<br />
  23. 23. Ehreth’s 2004 critique of the Master Plan<br />
  24. 24. “on-street road segments suggested by the Master Plan were very unsafe for shared use of bicycles and automobiles” – Ben Ehreth 2004<br />
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  31. 31. Current shortcomings<br />Not up to date with latest paths<br />Unfamiliar with backroads, cut-throughs, unofficial paths, and B-biker workarounds<br />Focus on A-bikers (<2%)<br />Recent innovations in bicycle planning <br />
  32. 32. A revised approach …<br />Focus on B-bikers not A-bikers<br />Focus on everyday commuting, not just recreation<br />Goal: Complete ½ mile unbroken grid network<br />Use separate low-traffic routes when possible (B-biker friendly)<br />
  33. 33. Why B-bikers?<br />Over 85% of potential riders<br />A-Bikers will ride anyway <br />B-bikers not swayed by A-focused improvements<br />
  34. 34. Types of Cyclists (Portland DOT Revision)<br />Strong & Fearless = 1-2% (prefer no amenities … ride with traffic)<br />Enthused & Confident = 6% (will ride with traffic, but prefer amenities)<br />Interested but scared = 60%<br />“No way. No how” = 32%<br />Aim for the 60%<br />
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  36. 36. “safe and comfortable”<br />
  37. 37. Goal: An unbroken “green” grid<br />
  38. 38. Ehreth’s 2004 calculations<br />
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  42. 42. Adding Points of Interests (POIs)with an iPhone using Mapzen<br />
  43. 43. Sharing Tracks on iPhone<br />
  44. 44. OSMTracker for Android<br />
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  50. 50. We’re closer than we think …<br />
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  52. 52. B-biker accessibility<br />
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  55. 55. Projects Needed<br />
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  60. 60. How do we get there?<br />
  61. 61. Step One: Mark and promote current network<br />
  62. 62. Step Two: Transform informal network into official Bicycle Boulevards<br />
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  69. 69. 12 miles needed=<br />$56,000 for signs<br />$30,000 for road markings<br />More for signals, etc. if needed<br />
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  71. 71. 9th & Houston<br />
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  75. 75. Advantages of BBs<br />Cheap! (as little as $3,500/mile)<br />Works for B-bikers (Portland State study)<br />B-biker access to key destinations<br />Preliminary studies show dramatic increase in ridership <br />Creates *liveable* streets<br />“For people concerned with safety and avoiding traffic, a well-connected network of low-traffic streets, including some bicycle boulevards, may be more effective than adding bike lanes on major streets with high volumes of motor vehicle traffic.” – Jennifer Dill 2009 JPHP<br />
  76. 76. But they don’t solve all our problems …<br />
  77. 77. Still needed<br />2.5 miles of essential trails (Hayes, Anderson, Poliska, Miller Ranch – Anneberg, etc.)<br />2 miles of recommended trails<br />2 miles of recreational trail (N. Linear)<br />6 crossings of “the beltway”<br />A few other intersection/crossing improvements<br />
  78. 78. Setting Specific Priorities: Garden City example<br />
  79. 79. Austin Model (1,600 projects!)<br />
  80. 80. The Manhattan Formula<br /># of key destinations served by route<br />x # of people served by that route<br />x level of improvement of that route<br />+ “network score” which =<br />1,000s of people brought into network<br />+ centrality of the improvement<br />+ miles of bike-able routes it adds to network<br />/ total cost = Impact per Dollar <br />
  81. 81. Improvement Matrix<br />Other notes:<br />Bike Lanes = +1<br />Soft Surface => Hard Surface = +1<br />Smooth Surface => +1<br />(Soft => Smooth = +2)<br />Sidewalk = Street Score +1 (min.2)<br />
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  84. 84. Current priorities posted on city website<br />
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  86. 86. Summary of suggested revisions<br />Current Master Plan<br />Suggested Revisions<br />bike lanes on core major arterials, complete Linear Trail<br />Bike lanes on outer arterials (including roads with existing multi-use paths)<br />Bike lanes in new developments<br />Bicycle boulevards(BBs), complete core connections (will increase ridership)<br />Complete outer connections using short multi-use paths connecting living streets / BBs.<br />With money saved, dream big. Manhattan Greenway Project.<br />(Update code to include requirement for BB/connections every 2,000 feet in new developments. Culdesacs must have pedestrian/bicycle connectivity.<br />
  87. 87. Additional slides from Talbert & Vickrey for brainstorming session<br />

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