Research, technology & networks Martin Weller
Background <ul><li>Open Access book on digital scholarship </li></ul><ul><li>Boyer’s categories of discovery, integration,...
I’m depressed
<ul><li>Researchers of Tomorrow: Annual Report: 2009‐2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Julie Carpenter, Louise Wetheridge, Nick Smith...
<ul><li>“ a majority of researchers are making at least occasional use of one or more web 2.0 tools or services for purpos...
<ul><li>Carpenter  et al  describe researchers as ‘risk averse’ and ‘behind the curve in using digital technology’.  </li>...
<ul><li>Harley et al (2010)  “We found no evidence to suggest that “tech-savvy” young graduate students, postdoctoral scho...
<ul><li>“The advice given to pre-tenure scholars was consistent across all fields: focus on publishing in the right venues...
<ul><li>Kroll & Forsman </li></ul><ul><li>“ Almost all researchers have created a strong network of friends and colleagues...
<ul><li>Waldrop 2008 (on blogging) </li></ul><ul><li>““ It's so antithetical to the way scientists are trained,&quot; Duke...
Some thoughts
The negative context
The inverse innovation diagram
Relationship to publishing/ reward
Research is about control
Research is most valued
Possible changes
Granularity
Bellow’s Law <ul><li>“there is no fineness or accuracy of suppression; if you hold down one thing, you hold down the adjoi...
Pushback from outlets
Crowdsourcing
Light connections & nodes
What is research? <ul><li>REF: “a process of investigation leading to new insights effectively shared” </li></ul>
Does it matter?
Powerful tools
Network weather
Researchers should lead
What do you think? <ul><li>Too pessimistic? </li></ul><ul><li>Should we just let it play out? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it happ...
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Research, technology & networks

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I look at some recent surveys of researchers' use of new technologies and suggest why uptake has been slow and what the emerging trends might be.

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Research, technology & networks

  1. 1. Research, technology & networks Martin Weller
  2. 2. Background <ul><li>Open Access book on digital scholarship </li></ul><ul><li>Boyer’s categories of discovery, integration, application & teaching </li></ul>
  3. 3. I’m depressed
  4. 4. <ul><li>Researchers of Tomorrow: Annual Report: 2009‐2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Julie Carpenter, Louise Wetheridge, Nick Smith, Meg Goodman, Oscar Struijvé </li></ul><ul><li>A Slice of Research Life: Information Support for Research in the United States </li></ul><ul><li>Susan Kroll and Rick Forsman </li></ul><ul><li>Procter, R., Williams, R., and Stewart, J. (2010).  If you build it, will they come? How researchers perceive and use web 2.0 . Research Information Network, London. </li></ul><ul><li>THE LIVES AND TECHNOLOGIES OF EARLY CAREER RESEARCHERS </li></ul><ul><li>Laura James, John Norman, Anne-Sophie De Baets, Ingrid Burchell-Hughes, Helen Burchmore, Dr Amyas Philips, Dr Dan Sheppard Dr Linda Wilks, Prof. John Wolffe </li></ul><ul><li>Harley, Diane, Acord, Sophia Krzys, Earl-Novell, Sarah, Lawrence, Shannon, </li></ul><ul><li>& King, C. Judson. (2010). Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: An Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven </li></ul><ul><li>Disciplines. UC Berkeley: Center for Studies in Higher Education. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.mendeley.com/research-papers/collections/4482331/Digital-Scholarship-Book/ </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>“ a majority of researchers are making at least occasional use of one or more web 2.0 tools or services for purposes related to their research: for communicating their work; for developing and sustaining networks and collaborations; or for finding out about what others are doing. But frequent or intensive use is rare, and some researchers regard blogs, wikis and other novel forms of communication as a waste of time or even dangerous” </li></ul><ul><li>( Proctor, Williams and Stewart (2010) </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Carpenter et al describe researchers as ‘risk averse’ and ‘behind the curve in using digital technology’. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Harley et al (2010) “We found no evidence to suggest that “tech-savvy” young graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, or assistant professors are bucking traditional publishing practices” </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>“The advice given to pre-tenure scholars was consistent across all fields: focus on publishing in the right venues and avoid spending too much time on public engagement, committee work, writing op-ed pieces, developing websites, blogging, and other non-traditional forms of electronic dissemination” </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>Kroll & Forsman </li></ul><ul><li>“ Almost all researchers have created a strong network of friends and colleagues and they draw together the same team repeatedly for new projects… </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone emphasizes the paramount importance of interpersonal contact as the vital basis for agreeing to enter into joint work. Personal introductions, conversations at meetings or hearing someone present a paper were cited as key in choosing collaborators.” </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>Waldrop 2008 (on blogging) </li></ul><ul><li>““ It's so antithetical to the way scientists are trained,&quot; Duke University geneticist Huntington F. Willard said at the April 2007 North Carolina Science Blogging Conference.. The whole point of blogging is spontaneity--getting your ideas out there quickly, even at the risk of being wrong or incomplete. “But to a scientist, that's a tough jump to make,” says Willard. “When we publish things, by and large, we've gone through a very long process of drafting a paper and getting it peer reviewed.” </li></ul>
  11. 11. Some thoughts
  12. 12. The negative context
  13. 13. The inverse innovation diagram
  14. 14. Relationship to publishing/ reward
  15. 15. Research is about control
  16. 16. Research is most valued
  17. 17. Possible changes
  18. 18. Granularity
  19. 19. Bellow’s Law <ul><li>“there is no fineness or accuracy of suppression; if you hold down one thing, you hold down the adjoining” </li></ul><ul><li>There is no targeting of liberation; if you release one thing, you also release the adjoining . </li></ul>
  20. 20. Pushback from outlets
  21. 21. Crowdsourcing
  22. 22. Light connections & nodes
  23. 23. What is research? <ul><li>REF: “a process of investigation leading to new insights effectively shared” </li></ul>
  24. 24. Does it matter?
  25. 25. Powerful tools
  26. 26. Network weather
  27. 27. Researchers should lead
  28. 28. What do you think? <ul><li>Too pessimistic? </li></ul><ul><li>Should we just let it play out? </li></ul><ul><li>Is it happening anyway? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the barriers? </li></ul>

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