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Temporary vandalism ArtRadar: Contemporary Trends in Art
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Temporary vandalism ArtRadar: Contemporary Trends in Art

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Refacing is a form of street art where artists “defile” public property in a way that is not permanent. Examples of this include yarn-bombing, sticker-slapping, and “reverse” graffiti. …

Refacing is a form of street art where artists “defile” public property in a way that is not permanent. Examples of this include yarn-bombing, sticker-slapping, and “reverse” graffiti.
This trend came about when police began cracking down harder on graffiti artists. By making their art temporary, artists believed it could not be considered vandalism and they would therefore not get in trouble.
Unfortunately, many policemen do still consider this type of art vandalism and illegal.

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  • The idea of sticker art has been around a while, but has really taken hold in the last few years. Now, it is everywhere and everyone does it.
    Before, the subject on the stickers was often confined to a theme. For example up until 2007 or 2008, almost all stickers were put up to convey a political message and it was questionable whether or not it was “art”. Today, there is no question that sticker art is art.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Refacing Yarn-Bombing, Sticker Slapping, and “Reverse” Graffiti
    • 2. Refacing “Its refacing, not defacing…Its very temporary. It glows and twinkles and then fades away.”- Paul “Moose” Curtis • Refacing is a form of street art where artists “defile” public property in a way that is not permanent. Examples of this include yarn-bombing, sticker-slapping, and “reverse” graffiti. • This trend came about when police began cracking down harder on graffiti artists. By making their art temporary, artists believed it could not be considered vandalism and they would therefore not get in trouble. • Unfortunately, many policemen do still consider this type of art vandalism and illegal.
    • 3. Sticker Art •Sticker art is slapping stickers (with your art on them) onto public places. •Signs, buildings, posts, cars, mailboxes, etc •Sticker art is one of the forms of temporary vandalism less tolerated by law enforcement officers because it does take some effort to remove the stickers. Miami, Florida http://www.streetartstickers.com/
    • 4. B.N.E. “I can’t do 500 tags in a day, but I can do 500 stickers.” • B.N.E is a more well-known sticker artist. • His stickers, simply featuring the letters BNE, are found all over the world. • There are people who constantly hunt for B.N.E stickers and create blogs and Flickr pages devoted solely to him. • In San Francisco, there is a $2,500 for the person behind the B.N.E stickers. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/17/us/17graffiti.html
    • 5. Yarn-Bombing • Yarn-bombing is covering public objects with knitting. This includes tree cozies, roof blankets, telephone-booth sweaters, etc. • The movement started with a single event in London in 2009 called Knit the City • Since then, the movement has become worldwide. Now you can find knitting covered objects almost anywhere. • Strangely, yarn-bombing is still considered vandalism by police in most European countries and the United States. However, most knitting artists have only ever reported getting warnings rather than arrests. A knit street corner in New York City
    • 6. Lauren O’Farrell • Lauren O’Farrell is the founder of the Knit the City organization in London. • She knit-bombs herself but her most important accomplishment in making the movement more wellknown and globalized. http://yarnbombing.com/files/2009/07/phonebox31.jpg
    • 7. Reverse Graffiti • Reverse graffiti is when artists carve into dirt or dust already present on a surface. Some artists just use their fingers while other artist use (environmentally friendly) cleaning products. • Acceptance of this particular form of street art usually varies case by case. http://www.dirtycarart.com/DCAGallery/slides/038_GWPE.html
    • 8. Reverse Graffiti Artists Scott Wade • Artist of dirtycarart.com • Scott is known for recreating old masters drawings in random dirty car windshields Paul “Moose” Curtis • An English reverse graffiti artist who creates massive murals in dirty places by using GreenWorks cleaning products and a wire brush.
    • 9. http://www.dirtycarart.com/DCAGallery/index.html
    • 10. http://feelgoodguru.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/dirty-pictures.jpg
    • 11. Bibliography