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Newpp Newpp Presentation Transcript

  • Birth Control Pills
  • What is the birth control pill?
    • The Pill is taken by mouth by the woman to prevent pregnancy, and when taken correctly, is up to 99.9% effective.
    • According to the Center for disease control and prevention, “The leading contraceptive method among women aged 15-29 is the pill.”
  • How long have birth control pills been around?
    • Oral contraception is about four thousand years old. There is a long history of woman orally consuming a wide concoction  of " potions" and toxins to prevent pregnancy.
    • Women in China drank mercury to prevent pregnancy.
    • Women in India swallowed carrot seeds as  a "morning after" contraceptive in 1500s.
    • Today's birth control pills were developed in the 1930s  from Mexican plant barbasco root.
  • How long have birth control pills been around?
    • More than 45 years since the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved "the pill" in 1960, it continues to be the most popular and one of the most effective forms of reversible birth control ever invented.
  • How does the birth control pills prevent pregnancy?
    • Normally a woman becomes pregnant when an egg released from her ovary is fertilized by a man's sperm. The fertilized egg attaches to the woman's uterus where it receives nourishment and develops into a baby. Hormones in the woman's body control the release of the egg from the ovary and prepare the body to accept the fertilized egg.
  • How does the birth control pills prevent pregnancy?
    • The pill contains a small amount of synthetic estrogens and progestin hormones. These hormones work to inhibit the body's natural cyclical hormones to prevent pregnancy.
    • Pregnancy is prevented because the pill:
      • stops the body from releasing an egg from the ovary
      • changes the cervical mucus to make it difficult for the sperm to find an egg
      • makes the lining of the womb inhospitable for implantation
  • What types of birth control pills are available?
    • The 3 most common types of birth control pills:
    • 1. Progestin-only pills (POP).
      • This type of pill contains no estrogen. Called the progestin-only pill, or "mini-pill," it's ideal for breastfeeding women because estrogen reduces milk production. It's also ideal for women who cannot take estrogen.
  • What types of birth control pills are available?
    • 2. Combination pills
      • When you hear the term "birth control pill," it most often refers to oral contraceptives containing estrogen and progestin. Each pill in the pack contains a combination of these two hormones.
  • What types of birth control pills are available?
    • In September 2003, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a 91-day oral contraceptive regimen called Seasonale, in which you take a pill containing progestin and estrogen for 12 weeks (84 days), followed by one week of placebo tablets. If you use this product, you only menstruate about once every three months instead of once a month.
  • What types of birth control pills are available?
    • 3. Emergency contraceptive pills
      • ECPs are not intended to be used regularly as a contraceptive. They are designed to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex.
  • What if I forget to take one or more birth control pills?
    • If you forget to take one active combination pill at your usual time, take it as soon as you remember.
    • Take your next pill at the regular time. Also, use a back-up type of contraception such as condoms for the 7 days after the missed pill.
    • If you do not remember until the next day, then take two pills that day.
  • How many women actually use birth control pills?
    • According to the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Population Information Program, more than 18 million US women rely on birth control pills, also called oral contraceptives, as their birth control method.
    • Only 73 % of women have admitted to ever used a condom, yet 80% of women have used BCPs.
  • Are birth control pills safe?
    • Unlike the original oral contraceptives used decades ago, low-dose forms with few health risks are the norm. Today's birth control pills even offer health benefits.
    • Although generally safe they do have some side effects, and long term health risks, but also many benefits.
  • What are the side effects?
    • Common:
    • Nausea
    • Weight gain
    • Sore or swollen breasts
    • Small amount of blood, or spotting, between periods
    • Lighter periods
    • Mood changes
    • Abnormal & Serious:
    • Abdominal pain (stomach pain)
    • Chest pain
    • Headaches (severe)
    • Eye problems (blurred vision)
    • Swelling and/or aching in the legs and thighs
  • Benefits
    • Prevent pregnancy
    • Improve menstruation cycle
    • Prevent cancer
    • Improve bone density
    • Protect from ovarian cysts
  • Risks
    • Heart attack
    • Ischemic stroke
    • Migraines and stroke
    • Venous thromboembolism
    • Worsen severe diabetes
    • Possible acceleration of gallbladder disease
    • Lupus/sickle cell anemia
  • What do other people in our class think about taking birth control pills?
    • When asked her opinion on birth control Lori said she was "All for it. The absence of birth control can alter your life dramatically.“
    • Ashley, another student in the class said "I think birth control is okay depending on what its used for. If you need it, then its a good idea."
  • What do real women using birth control pills think about them?
    • Crystal is currently taking the brand "Ortho Tri-cyclen“.
      • She has been using birth control pills takes them every night for 4 years now.
      • Menstrual cycle has decrease in flow and length
      • Noticed a weight gain of 25 pounds
      • Experiences a constant feeling of hunger
      • Notices no headache   
    • When she stopped using pills for about a year because her doctor moved away, it took about 6 months for her body to go back/ regulate.
  • What do real women using birth control pills think about them?
    • Antonet started using birth control pills from the age 14-18.
      • Still got pregnant
      • Use to have really heavy menstrual cycle (it was so bad that she even went to the hospital to get shots, so her cramps wouldn't be so painful).
      • Her menstrual cycle is now light and short.
  • Conclusion
    • According to the Center for disease control and prevention, “The leading contraceptive method among women aged 15-29 is the pill.”
    • There are 3 major types of the BCPs, within them are subgroups like Seasonale for example.
    • The birth control pill was an important invention for women, it has liberated women and allowed them to be much more spontaneous and carefree.
    • Interestingly only 73 % of women have admitted to ever used a condom, yet 80% of women have used BCPs. It is the most popular and most effective form of birth control. “the pill” is safe and women have adjusted to popping the pill on a daily bases.
    • By increasing the hormones in your body , your body chemistry changes, thus preventing pregnancy.
    • And remember NO contraceptive methods are 100% perfect. As we have heard every contraceptive has advantages and disadvantages.
    • When it comes time for you to pick what birth control you want, you have to take in consideration your own body and what is best for yourself.
  • References
    • "The Gynecological Sourcebook" Author : M. Sara Rosenthal, Ph.D. 4th edition
    • Personal Reference - Lori
    • Personal Reference - Ashley
    • Personal Reference - Crystal
    • Personal Reference - Antonet
    • http://www.youngwomenshealth.org/femalehormone1.html
    • http://webmd.com
    • http://healthywomen.org