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Writing in the right way for your website, by Expert Market
 

Writing in the right way for your website, by Expert Market

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We take turns to present on a given subject, while another of us bakes. This is David's slideshow, the week Andrea baked strudel, and it's all about writing for websites and also how different sites ...

We take turns to present on a given subject, while another of us bakes. This is David's slideshow, the week Andrea baked strudel, and it's all about writing for websites and also how different sites have devised their own ways for people to engage with the site and other users. A better title might have been 'Attention currency', but I chose the far less attractive title of 'Writing in the right way for your website.'
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    Writing in the right way for your website, by Expert Market Writing in the right way for your website, by Expert Market Presentation Transcript

    • Tell me if you disagree with this next bit
    • -iii- Playthings still have to work.
    • 1. Transition Voice likes to be provocative and talk about how the US governmentand big business are manipulative bullies etc.I’ve tried a few semi-provocative posts. Worth it sometimes, not always.( – NB: Readers like articles to be surprising AND PLEASANT )
    • 2. Low Carbon Hub has a team of ‘hub advisors’ who write their blog posts.You can send messages to advisors. This page makes clear to visitors this siteis a bonified resource for them. Each advisor has a different speciality. Wecould do more along these lines, with an ‘about us’ section on blogs andarticles?
    • 2. The AV Club knows exactly what kind of person reads their site. They aretheir own demographic. Perhaps we could find out more about ours? The AVClub site contains nothing that its visitors won’t want to play with. Allreviews, love columns. It’s a sweet shop for geeks and fanboys.
    • 4. The Independent has this feature on its opinion articles. It’s installed its own system ofStrongly Agree vs Strongly Disagree votes, instead of using a Facebook plug-in or straight upcomments section with up-voting and down-voting. They obviously want people to getpassionate in this part of their website.I don’t think we would do this, or have the visitors to do this, but it’s interesting nonetheless.
    • 5. MNN – Mother Nature Network. These guys use a points system so people can find out whatbird they are, beginning as a chick and eventually becoming a bald eagle. Is it meant to beinspiring? Just a clickety reward system.For sites like VIVATIC this would work along Taskrabbit lines – the better you are the more youcan charge. Could potentially work if we included author bio’s for our articles, but I doubt thisis going to happen.
    • The next slide is on the Uswitchblog, which is pretty dry. It’sinformative, and I think it’s agood blog, but from theengagement data looks like noone reads it. However, they have this one writer who writes weird articles. His pieces always attract reponses. Who knows whether this means much in actual terms, but it’s a thing I’ve noticed.
    • dafuq did I just read