Gken

908 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
908
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
44
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Gken

  1. 1. ROADMAP TO BEST PRACTICES PROMOTION AND COMMUNICATION IN HEALTHCARE Massimo Vergnano
  2. 2. STREAMS COMMUNICATION ROLE OF INTEGRATED BUILDING GKEN BACKGROUNDER HEALTH 2.0 MODELS MEDIA COMMUNICATION BRAND Extreme futures Definition Media effects on Social health Insights driven Customer insight health campaign Extreme brand strategy demographics Patient Celbrities Communication GKEN Maslow Insights compliance quadrant Positioning Health attitudes Brand building Television Resouce Files GKEN Vision Patient Patient segmenttation Empowerment Canadians Resource Kit Compliance
  3. 3. EXTREME FUTURES 3
  4. 4. http://www.globalfuturist.com/ 4
  5. 5. EXTREME DEMOGRAPHICS AGING BOOMERS YOUTH BOOMERS CHRONIC DISEASES RISKY LIFESTYLES • Diabetes •Tobacco • Obesity •Alcohol • CAD •Food • COPD •Drugs • Alzheimer •Sex • Depression •CHF 9 BILLION WORLD POPULATION IN 2030 5
  6. 6. MASLOW' NEEDS THEORY (Not so extreme people insights) 6
  7. 7. MASLOW Motivation and personality 7
  8. 8. PEOPLE ARE CLASSIFIED BY THEIR DOMINANT VALUE ENLIGHTENMENT REFORMER DISCOVERY EXPLORER CONTROL SUCCEEDER STATUS ASPIRER SECURITY MAINSTREAM ESCAPE STRUGGLER SURVIVAL RESIGNED 8
  9. 9. ADOPTION CURVE Mature 9
  10. 10. ADOPTION CURVE Mature 10
  11. 11. ADOPTION CURVE Young 11
  12. 12. PEOPLE ATTITUDES TO HEALTH ISSUES Resigned Survival Struggler Needs Driven Emergency Remedy Mainstream Problem Driven Protection Aspirer Cosmetic Succeeder Benefit Driven Avoidance/Control Explorer General wellbeing Reformer Ideology Driven Holistic 12
  13. 13. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS ATTITUDES Better informed More demanding More critical than patient suffering from acute diseases Patient insights – a typology of chronically ill patients - Joachim Scholz Ligma 13
  14. 14. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS SEGMENTATION Dimension disease-related information behavior willingness to involve in therapy decisions brand awareness of pharmaceutical products willingness to make co-payments health consciousness compliance self-efficacy attitude towards physician Patient insights – a typology of chronically ill patients - Joachim Scholz Ligma 14
  15. 15. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS SEGMENTATION Distribution of patient types Patient insights – a typology of chronically ill patients - Joachim Scholz Ligma 15
  16. 16. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS SEGMENTATION Socio demographics of patient types 16
  17. 17. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS SEGMENTATION Overall profile of patient types Patient insights – a typology of chronically ill patients - Joachim Scholz Ligma 17
  18. 18. PATIENT COMPLIANCE 18
  19. 19. PATIENT COMPLIANCE 19
  20. 20. PATIENT COMPLIANCE 20
  21. 21. PATIENT COMPLIANCE 21
  22. 22. PATIENT COMPLIANCE 22
  23. 23. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS SEGMENTATION Overall profile of patient types Patient insights – A typology of chronically ill patients - Joachim Scholz Ligma 23
  24. 24. CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS SEGMENTATION Inportance of information souces Patient insights – a typology of chronically ill patients - Joachim Scholz Ligma 24
  25. 25. COMMUNICATION MODELS 25
  26. 26. COMMUNICATION MODELS HEALTH BELIEF SOCIO- COGNITIVE AUSTRALIA SMOKING UK Brain Lungs SCOTLAND Arthery ENGLAND CARDIOVASCULAR ALCOHOL HYPERTENSION ALCOHOL 26
  27. 27. CHANGING ATTITUDES TO HEALTH OLD HEALTH PARADIGM “OLD NEW PARADIGM” Physical health Holistic health- physical mental , emotional and spiritual Genetics and disease as Genetics and disease plus stress, CHANGE problems lifestyle, nutrition, mood and evitoment Passive acceptance Active control Physician as healthcare Many authorities, resources, partners authority and self Drugs Nutrition, diet, healthy regime Absence of disease Wellness LAGGARD INNOVATOR 27
  28. 28. CHANGING ATTITUDES TO HEALTH “NEW PARADIGM” CHANGE Health 2.0 ??? EMPOWERED ?? 28
  29. 29. HEALTH 2.0 29
  30. 30. HEALTH 2.0 DEFINITION Health 2.0 goes way beyond just the pervasive social networking technology to include a complete renaissance in the way that Healthcare is actually delivered. Scott Shreeve Founder of CrossOver Healthcare http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 30
  31. 31. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 31
  32. 32. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 32
  33. 33. HEALTH 2.0 1. Health 2.0 is all about Patient Empowered Healthcare whereby patients have the information they need to be able to make rational healthcare decisions (transparency of information) based on value (outcomes over price). Everyone in the healthcare process is focused on increasing value for the patient. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 33
  34. 34. HEALTH 2.0 1. Health 2.0 is absolutely reliant on interoperability of health information. Everything from the Personal Health Record (PHR), to the Clinic Health Record (CHR), to the Enterprise Health Record (EHR), to the National Health Record (NHR) must be based on standards, be seamlessly transitioned between environments per standardized security and privacy protocols, and be accessible anytime from anywhere. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 34
  35. 35. HEALTH 2.0 1. The Four Cornerstones (Connectivity, Price, Quality, and Incentives) of the Value Driven Healthcare movement begin to create a virtuous cycle of innovation and reform. Transparency serves as a key catalyst in this process by creating positive sum competition that can deliver better outcomes at a lower cost. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 35
  36. 36. HEALTH 2.0 1. As a result of increased transparency, there will be a wave of innovation at all points along the full cycle of care which includes phases where health care service providers Educate, Prevent, Diagnose, Prepare, Intervene, Recover, Monitor, and Manage the various disease states. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 36
  37. 37. HEALTH 2.0 1. An increased amount of personal health and outcomes information will create an ongoing role for infomediaries and related services providers to add value at each stage of the full cycle of care. These value added Health Advisory Services will offered by hundreds of companies, in thousands of forms, to millions of people who are can benefit from the remixing of medically related information. http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 37
  38. 38. MEDICINE 2.0/3.0 Next generation medicine http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 38
  39. 39. HEALTH 2.0 Patient empowerment philosophy is under the effect of different drivers and resistance that at each European country… http://health20.org/wiki/Health_2.0_Definition 39
  40. 40. INFLUENCE BY DIFFERENT DRIVERS DRIVER FRANCE GERMANY ITALY SPAIN UK JAPAN US The healthcare siystem Powerful Advocancy Groups The strength of media Influence in healthcare issues Use of internet Direct to consumer marketing Overall effect eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 40
  41. 41. eHealth in Europe The ACM model Recent research on Internet based applications for citizen , has proposed the so called “ACM” model that considers the propensity of patients to adopt e-Services is a function of three main factors: Access Competence Motivation eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 41
  42. 42. THE ACM MODEL Access Is the capacity of the user to be electronically connect to Internet Services ( at home or alternatively sufficiently good access elsewhere) and the no existance of barriers to operate the terminal devices and the user interface because personal limitations or mismatches eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 42
  43. 43. THE ACM MODEL Competence Reflects the capacity on e- Skills – i.e. the extent to which a person knows how to use computing devices, communication terminals , and Internet at the level needed to use the electronic service. This concept can be extended to include capacity to work with eHealth tools. eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 43
  44. 44. THE ACM MODEL Motivation Is defined in terms of explicit willingness to use the electronic services in general; and in terms of relative preference for the particular mean for information access (online, face-to-face; postal; phone, mobile) eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 44
  45. 45. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT Access Competence IV II VI I III V VII Motivation eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 45
  46. 46. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT Access Competence IV II VI Has all three factors – access, motivation and I competence. Rapresents the III V group of potential users ready to adopt the eHealth service VII Motivation eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 46
  47. 47. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT Intermediaries can Access II VI IV be axpected to play a particulary important role for this group, i.e household Only has access, I members or friends who are able and but not competence willing to provide nor motivation; III V the required both motivational technical help in and training accessing online interventions qill be services and needed. VII applications eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 47
  48. 48. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT Access Competence IV II VI Only has motivation; will require both I infrastuctrural and training III V interventions. It should be explorer if traditional channels are not more appropriate VII to provide this group with services Motivation eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 48
  49. 49. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT Access Competence IV II VI None of the three conditions exist; multi- dimentional I interventions will be needed III V VII Motivation eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 49
  50. 50. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT BEWARE OF MASLOW eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 50
  51. 51. PATIENT EMPOWERMENT Mobile Access Competence IV II VI Accesibility & Design for All in eHealth I III V Personalized Solutions to Actual Patient Education needs (Chronic Care) VII Motivation eHealth for patient empowerment in Europe – Josè Luis Moneagudo et.all. - 2007 51
  52. 52. ROLE OF MEDIA IN SHAPING BEHAVIOURS 52
  53. 53. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH 53
  54. 54. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH The 27-year-old discovered she had cancer in the middle of last year, while starring on India’s version of the programme that made her name – Big Brother. Since then her battle with the disease has been filmed and media coverage of her declining health has been daily. Since her diagnosis the number of tests has risen by 30 per cent – in the six months up to October 41,677 smears had been carried out, compared with 32,095 for the same time last year. Charities said they too had noticed a rise in inquiries about the disease. 54
  55. 55. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH The increase in tests follows a similar public reaction to singer Kylie Minogue’s high-profile battle with breast cancer. Chiefs said an increase in breast cancer diagnosis was directly linked to a heightened awareness of screening. 55
  56. 56. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH Advertising , consumer behavior and health : Exploring possibilities for health 56 promotion Bob. F Fennis .International Journal of Medical Marketing - 2002
  57. 57. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH Program content,advertising and health The results from this research indicated that more than two- thirds of non nutritious foods were represented in program content other than television advertising, while 62 percent of nutritious foods were represented in commercials Advertising , consumer behavior and health : Exploring possibilities for health 57 promotion Bob. F Fennis .International Journal of Medical Marketing - 2002
  58. 58. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH Using television programming as a health promotion tool 1) The media advocacy approach: 2.Creative epidemiology 3.Issue framing 4.Gaining access to news media outlets Advertising , consumer behavior and health : Exploring possibilities for health 58 promotion Bob. F Fennis .International Journal of Medical Marketing - 2002
  59. 59. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH Using television programming as a health promotion tool 2) The entertainment education approach: The Dutch Heart Foundation has participated in the production of the three episodes of a popular hospital drama series aired in the Netherlands Advertising , consumer behavior and health : Exploring possibilities for health 59 promotion Bob. F Fennis .International Journal of Medical Marketing - 2002
  60. 60. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH Using television programming as a health promotion tool 3) The consumer behaviour approach “ A strategy aimed at modifying health-related aspects of consumer behaviours through commercial advertising in cooperation with manufactures and marketers of health-related products and services” Advertising , consumer behavior and health : Exploring possibilities for health 60 promotion Bob. F Fennis .International Journal of Medical Marketing - 2002
  61. 61. MEDIA EFFECTS ON HEALTH Relationship between health behavior and consumer behaviour – a warning … eating, smoking, drug, alcohol use, and sex are primarily health behaviors to only a few (notably health professionals while on the job)… For most people, in most situations, the social and hedonic consequences of these behaviors are far more salient than health consequences… Advertising , consumer behavior and health : Exploring possibilities for health 61 promotion Bob. F Fennis .International Journal of Medical Marketing - 2002
  62. 62. INTEGRATED COMMUNICATION 62
  63. 63. SOCIAL HEALTH CAMPAIGN Key issues A wider challenge than before A need to engage a wide number of stakeholder Utilise a wider number of channels, than even before Importance of "persuasion" not just information Importance of activities that "engage" the target audience Importance of offering solutions, not just telling the public about the problems 63
  64. 64. PLANNING THE INTEGRATION The communication quadrant Professional/ Events Public Relations Education Advertising 64
  65. 65. PLANNING THE INTEGRATION The communication quadrant Credibility Action Professional/ Events Public Relations Education Advertising Involvement Theme Message 65
  66. 66. TOBACCO CONTROL CAMPAIGN IN UK How the Integration of Advertisers made Advertising more Powerful than Word of Mout - Frank Reitgassl 66
  67. 67. RESOURCE FILE Learning from big Pharma Resource File is a comprehensive tool-kit distributed to by Corporate HQs to the local Affiliates Its main goal is to provide the local companies with all the elements which will be necessary to implement a successful communication program Resource file should include both strategic guidelines and tactical directions, as well as templates to facilitate the local development and production of relevant materials The overall function of the Resources File is to ensure consistent communication strategy, both in terms of key messages and branding and design The Resource File includes electronic files of all the elements in order to facilitate local execution and production 67
  68. 68. RESOURCE FILE Learning from Canada http://www.cpha.ca/en/default.aspx 68
  69. 69. THE TOOL, WORKSHEETS AND RESOURCES The Tool, Worksheets and Resources presents eight Critical Success Factors for strengthening chronic disease prevention and management, with guiding questions for each. http://www.cpha.ca/en/default.aspx 69
  70. 70. HOWTO GUIDE The How-to Guide includes a series of modules that outline the key stages involved in using the Tool. http://www.cpha.ca/en/default.aspx 70
  71. 71. CASE STUDIES The Case Studies present information on how the tool was piloted in four sites across Canada. http://www.cpha.ca/en/default.aspx 71
  72. 72. RESOURCE FILE Learning from Canada http://www.cpha.ca/en/default.aspx 72
  73. 73. MASLOW' NEEDS THEORY (Not so extreme people insights) 73
  74. 74. Building Gken as brand 74
  75. 75. INSIGHTS DRIVEN BRAND STRATEGY Back to basics Customer Insights 2007 - How to pharmaceutical industry can connet with customers - 2007 75
  76. 76. GKEN POSITIONING What is your overall positioning? What customer segment are we targeting? What single statement most For ________ <target audience> reflects the Gken distinctive value Gken _______<summary statement> to each customer segment? That will _______<customer benefits> [because] ______<reason to believe> What emotional and end-use benefits will we choose to emphasize? What data / information reinforces the credibility of those benefits? 76
  77. 77. GKEN VISION ROAD BLOCKS 77
  78. 78. GKEN VISION KEY SUCCESS FACTOR 78
  79. 79. GKEN VISION STRATEGIES TACTICS 79
  80. 80. GKEN: yes we can! 80
  81. 81. Massimo Vergnano massimo.vergnano@multimediasystems.eu massimo.vergnano@argonnetwork.com 81

×