Verges Psychonomics2008

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Research on mental imagery of words and pictures presented at the 49th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society in Chicago, IL.

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  • Verges Psychonomics2008

    1. 1. Perceptual Simulation of Verbs and Pictures Michelle Verges Indiana University, South Bend Sean Duffy Rutgers University
    2. 2. Research Question: Do object images and motion words direct one’s spatial attention in mental imagery? <ul><li>Interplay between language and perception </li></ul><ul><li>Representational processes between symbols and referents </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    3. 3. Perceptual Symbol Systems Barsalou (1999, 2008) <ul><li>Sensorimotor representations that simulate perceptual, motor, and introspective processes </li></ul><ul><li>Integrate constituent features and orientations to form a single, multimodal representation </li></ul><ul><li>Contrasted with amodal symbol systems </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    4. 4. Perceptual-Interference Effects: Mental imagery can interfere with the direct perception of another stimulus <ul><li>If mental image and physical stimulus overlap spatially (Craver-Lemley & Arteberry, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>If mental image and physical stimulus activate different perceptual representations (Estes, Verges, & Barsalou, 2008) </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    5. 5. Spatial Cuing Paradigm <ul><li>Richardson, Spivey, Barsalou, & McRae (2003) horizontal/vertical sentences </li></ul><ul><li>Bergen, Lindsay, Matlock, & Narayanan (2007) up/down sentences </li></ul><ul><li>Estes, Verges, & Barsalou (2008) up/down nouns </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions o + cue (ISI) Prior Research Cue
    6. 6. Experiment 1 (N = 28) Object Images and Words <ul><li>32 object images and corresponding labels denoted up or down spatial prime </li></ul><ul><li>Up: cloud, flag, hat </li></ul><ul><li>Down: foot, whale, snake </li></ul><ul><li>Non-spatial: cake, lemon, comb </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    7. 7. Experiment 1 (N = 28) Object Images and Words <ul><li>32 object images and corresponding labels denoted up or down spatial prime </li></ul><ul><li>Primes presented centered of computer screen </li></ul><ul><li>Target letter (X, O) shown at top of bottom of display </li></ul><ul><li>Picture/word conditions counterbalanced </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    8. 8. Procedure Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions Fixation (250 ms) hat Prime (100 ms) ISI (50 ms) x Target (respond)
    9. 9. Results: Object Words Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions Spatial Prime
    10. 10. Results: Object Images Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions Spatial Prime
    11. 11. Experiment 2 (N = 48) Do perceptual-interference effects occur for motion words? <ul><li>Verbs require holistic representations found in literal sentences (Bergen et al., 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>But maybe not (Richardson et al., 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Verbs serve as the backbone of sentences (Pulverm ü ller, 2005) </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    12. 12. Experiment 2 (N = 48) <ul><li>32 verbs denoted up or down spatial prime </li></ul><ul><li>Up: climb, lift, rise </li></ul><ul><li>Down: dig, dive, fall </li></ul><ul><li>Non-spatial: choose, draw, tickle </li></ul><ul><li>Procedure identical to Experiment 1 </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    13. 13. Results: Motion Words Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions Spatial Prime
    14. 14. Conclusions <ul><li>Object and motion words automatically orient attention to their typical location </li></ul><ul><li>Interference effects due to sensorimotor representations (Barsalou, 2008; Pulverm ü ller, 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Object images do not automatically elicit perceptual simulations in mental imagery </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    15. 15. Implications <ul><li>Spatial representations elicit dual-coding effects in mental imagery (Paivio 1971, 1986, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental processes associated with children’s reading ability </li></ul><ul><li>Long-term effects of perceptual simulation and mental imagery </li></ul>Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions
    16. 16. Thanks for your attention! Perceptual Simulation Spatial Cuing Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Conclusions

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