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Google SketchUp for Media Architecture Communication

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Media Architecture Communication with Google SketchUp engages students in a formal design procedure, develops 21st century literacy skills, and achieves a high level of cognitive recognition. …

Media Architecture Communication with Google SketchUp engages students in a formal design procedure, develops 21st century literacy skills, and achieves a high level of cognitive recognition. Moreover, implementing new mobile technologies such as the iPad in the second decade of the 21st century may indeed be a catalyst for change in pedagogy and learning. Of course, as mobile technologies (hardware and software) are becoming ubiquitous in both learning and community spaces the best use can only be assessed through research and practice. One of the challenge for researchers worldwide is to determine how communication processes alter, how learning benefits and how teaching changes when multiple-media-enabled mobile IT are commonly available. Moreover, the challenge of transmedia communication radically alters the identity of academics involved in technology-enhanced design and communication. The foreseeable ubiquity of augmentation, ambient technologies, and near field communication requires academics to implement inter-disciplinary courses. Media Architecture Communication academics can begin that change as instructors and researchers of Information Science.


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    • 1. Google SketchUp for MediaArchitecture CommunicationDr. Michael Vallancewww.mvallance.net
    • 2. In 2011 - 2012 second year undergraduatestudents studying Information Design at FutureUniversity Hakodate considered alternativeenergies for Japans future. The studentsconducted a SWOT (Strengths -Weaknesses -Opportunities - Threats) analysis, located facts,sought opinions, compared new ideas withexisting energies, obtained feedback, anddesigned a 3D representation. They had 6 weeksto demonstrate their ideas using GoogleSketchUp.
    • 3. 2011–2012年、公立はこだて未来大学で情報デザインを学んでいる学部の2年生は、日本の未来に必要な代替エネルギーについて考察した。学生等はSWOT (Strengths[強み] -Weaknesses[弱み] - Opportunities[機会] -Threats[脅威])分析を行い、事実を探し、意見を求め、既存エネルギーに関する新アイディアを比較し、フィードバックを得、三次元表示をデザインした。GoogleSketchUpを使って自分のアイディアを実地説明するために、学生には6週間の作業時間が与えられた。ここに示すものは、。 
    • 4. ContextJapanese have an international image as communications rich (i.e.technologies) but communication poor. This course seeks to redressthis communications/communication cognitive dissonance.Digital media policy and the creative application of technologies arelagging in comparison with other Asian and developed nations.The course – partly designed, partly emergent – provides asynergistic pedagogical combination for students to analyze,articulate, and creatively communicate their images of the future.See Vallance, M. & Wright, D.L. (2010). Japanese Students’ Digitally Enabled Futures Images: A Synergistic Approach to DevelopingAcademic Competencies. In S. Mukerji & P. Tripathi (Eds.).  Cases on Technological Adaptability and Transnational Learning: Issues andChallenges. IGI Global: Hershey, USA. DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61520-779-4.ch009
    • 5. Media ArchitectureCommunicationAim: to develop 21st century literacy.Literacy is defined as the development ofacademic skills required to source, analyze,evaluate, manage, understand and make sense ofinformation in a variety of modes, andcommunicate outcomes in multiple formats(Vallance & Wright, 2010).
    • 6. Media ArchitectureCommunication objectivesFutures: to consider a problem and use strategictools to consider possible solutionsData: to seek out quantitative data and developinformed interpretationsDesign: to design possible solutions usingparticular workflowsCommunication: use multiple media to presentsolutions to a local and global audience
    • 7. InputThe instructor presents a ‘design forcommunication pathway’ process.The rationale is based upon Deweys experientiallearning and Kolbs social constructivistphilosophies for effective education.Dewey, J. (1938). Experience & Education. New York Simon & Schuster.Kolb, D. A. (1984). Experiential learning: experience as the source of learning and development. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, N.J.
    • 8. Media Architecture Communication Pre-production design brief/ Writing a clear proposal through objectives negotiation and discussion. Identify needs and requirements Brainstorming solution needs and design requirements. Organising the information. Write a survey, collect and collate dataInput in Excel, interpret data, and present with meaningful interpretations. Investigation and analysis of similar Web and library searching, collatingControlled designs and evaluating existing solutions. Advanced Google search techniques.practice Draw and document design solutions. Teamwork. Sketch and digitally draw Use of pencil and paper then SketchUp designs. Sharing designs. Upload digital designs to a shared WebOutput Post-production peer evaluation 2.0 site. Write formal evaluations online of other designs. Present designs Develop a short animation for the iPad. Use of multiple-media and multimodality. Report/ reflect on designs Draw an organized ‘mind map’ to reflect upon the experiences.
    • 9. Input to ControlledPractice At each step there are opportunities to undertakecontrolled practice. For instance, the topic for thiscontrolled practice is Future University, Hakodate,Japan (aka FUN).
    • 10. OutputStudents selected partners for teamwork. Theywere presented with a scenario: due to theenvironmental, social and political negativityrecently aimed at nuclear power, citizens arebecoming engaged in seeking alternatives energysources. In order to look further ahead andconsider alternative futures, the students in thisproject were tasked to design, justify and presentalternative energy futures.
    • 11. OutputTo communicate a convincing futures design to the localcommunity the students recognized the need to make amultiple media solution. The use of illustrator softwarewould result in two or three dimensional images butthese would be static. A movie with drawn animationswould communicate ideas but this was considered uninteractive, in other words, the viewer would have tosimply sit through a film being broadcasted without anyopportunity to engage with the media. The solution wasto use Google Sketchup.
    • 12. Google SketchUp3D design - information design students should be developing in 3Dnowadays, especially given the employment opportunities that isgoing to transpire as augmented reality applications proliferate andbecome ubiquitous ( see Nakashima, 2010)Free!Animations can be created to demonstrate the designUser can control the exported file and scroll around the design.Nakashima, H. (2010). Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments. Session 2, Keynote Lectures: “Future Technologies I: Communication” OurCommon Future, Hannover, November 3, 2010.
    • 13. Google SketchUpStudents used the data gathered in the freepractice tier to design their alternative futureenergies.The students had to supplement their design witha justification in the form of a report. This is typicalof any new design proposal. It has to be justifiedand the rationale of development outlined.
    • 14. Designs
    • 15. Designs
    • 16. Designs
    • 17. Designs
    • 18. Designs
    • 19. Designs
    • 20. Designs
    • 21. Designs
    • 22. Designs
    • 23. Designs
    • 24. Designs
    • 25. Designs
    • 26. Designs
    • 27. Designs
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    • 29. Designs
    • 30. Designs
    • 31. Designs
    • 32. Designs
    • 33. Designs
    • 34. The Apple iOS development tool called XCode was used tocreate a means of demonstrating the designs in a multi-modal,mobile, transmedia manner. Programming was undertakenusing Objective C. An App template was developed forcontent.A unique application has been programmed forApple’s new mobile iPod/iPhone/iPad technology. Thecontent for the application has been developed bysecond year Information Design students.The context of the content is Alternative FutureEnergies. Merging the designed content with theapplication program onto portable iPads will enablestudents to consider the further use of emergingmobile IT in strategically creative ways.
    • 35. PresentationIndependent of the course an iPad app was developed sothat the images could be viewed. Traditional PowerPointslide type presentations were rejected. Where is the powerand what is the point? (Tufte, 2006). The App enabledstudents to insert their images, add some text (about 50words) and include an audio summarizing their design. Theuser can swipe the app to move to and for images. Also, theimages can be rotated, zoomed in and out (pinching), andviewed statically. This gives the user an interactive feel andcan independent control the presentation experience. Anumber of iPads were set up in the university library forvisitors to experience.Tufte, E.R (2006). The visual display of quantitative information. Graphic Press: Cheshire, Connecticut.
    • 36. Presentation
    • 37. AssessmentThe projects were assessed in stages usingrubrics as score guides. The final design on iPadswere scored by another class of students. Again arubric was used and the scores provided by thestudents were added into the final course score.Weighting was design 30%, justification report30%, input exercises 30% and exceptional work(undefined but felt intuitive by instructor) 10%.
    • 38. AssessmentCriteriaTeam interaction/ teamwork/ project managementProject processCreativityPresentation –communication/ EnglishPresentation - MediaAnalysis/ understanding/ reflection
    • 39. Evaluation The survey was designed using a neo-Bloomian taxonomy developed by Vallance and Martin (2011). The survey statements coincided with established categorisation of cognitive processes (Anderson et al., 2000). Survey participants (N=40) indicated a high level of cognitive recognition.Looking at the post-course data, and combining SA and A.(1) remember – recognizing, recalling;I used some knowledge from previous lessons (89%).(2) understand – interpreting, exemplifying, classifying, summarizing, inferring, comparing,explaining;I had to explain something to another student (92%)(3) apply – executing, implementing;The project increased my digital and media literacy skills (88%).The project will help me communicate better in the future (97%).(4) analyze – differentiating, organizing, attributing;I analyzed something (94%).I had to solve a problem (89%).I learned about different viewpoints (92%).(5) evaluate – checking, critiquing;I disagreed with another student (61%).I had to make a decision (97%).I recommend the project to next year’s students (100%).(6) create – generating, planning, producing.I had some new ideas (89%).Anderson, L. W., Krathwohl, D. R., Airasian, P. W., Cruicshank, K. A., Mayer, R. E., & Pintrich, P. R. ... Wittrock, M. C. (2001) A taxonomy forlearning, teaching and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. New York, NY: Longman.Vallance, M. & Martin, S. (2011). A methodology for determining relationships between cognitive processes and the knowledge dimension whenimplementing tasks in virtual worlds. In Proceedings of the First International Virtual Environments Research Group (iVERG) conference.Immersive technologies for learning: a multi-disciplinary approach. Teesside University, UK. (pp.76-86). ISBN: 978-1-257-01934-2.
    • 40. Evaluation
    • 41. ConclusionThe survey regarding the academic benefits of integrating design andcommunication reveal that students are very positive about thetransmedia approach.Google SketchUp engages students in a formal design procedure,develops 21st century literacy skills, and achieves a high level ofcognitive recognition.Implementing the new mobile technologies of the second decade ofthe 21st century may indeed be a catalyst for change in pedagogy andlearning. Of course, as mobile technologies (hardware and software)are becoming ubiquitous in both learning and community spaces thebest use can only be assessed through research and practice.The challenge for researchers worldwide is to determine howcommunication processes alter, how learning benefits and howteaching changes when multiple-media-enabled mobile IT iscommonly available. This challenge is primarily due to something Icall transmedia communication.

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