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  • Every time that you do anything, pausing for a millisecond or two prevents complacency and ensures neither you nor anyone else gets injured – and that the job is done right first time.

Backcare5 g Backcare5 g Presentation Transcript

  • 1 Physical CarePhysical Care Welcome MANUAL HANDLING AWARENESS to This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 2 You are an animalYou are an animal You areYou are an animal !an animal !
  • 3 You are an animalYou are an animal Humans do unnatural acts
  • 4 You are an animalYou are an animal Humans do unnatural acts so S-t-r-e-t-c-h in and out of bed
  • 5 You are an animalYou are an animal Humans do unnatural acts S-t-r-e-t-c-h in and out of bed Warm-up before every action
  • 6 Physical CarePhysical Care  Falling Objects  Lifting and Carrying  Pushing and Pulling  Back Pain
  • 7 Falling ObjectsFalling Objects Falling ObjectsFalling Objects
  • 8 Falling ObjectsFalling Objects  No temporary piles  Stack items securely, don’t overload  Don’t stack different things on top of each other
  • 9 Falling ObjectsFalling Objects  No temporary piles  Stack items securely, don’t overload  Don’t stack different things on top of each other  Shut cupboards  Stand on steps, never on a swivel chair.
  • 10 Falling objectsFalling objects  If you need safety shoes, then always wear them!
  • 11 LiftingLifting LiftingLifting
  • 12 LiftingLifting Not or Manual handling is not just about special activities or super-fitness. It applies to every time that you lift anything, however common- place or seemingly innocuous.
  • 13 LiftingLifting Not or Minimise manual handling  consider alternative layout or system of work  use mechanical aids  get assistance for heavy or awkward loads.
  • 14 LiftingLifting  Split the load into several if possible
  • 15 LiftingLifting  Split the load into several if possible  Assess the weight, shape, freedom to move, centre of gravity, hand holds.  Use leverage if possible
  • 16 LiftingLifting  Split the load into several if possible  Assess the weight, shape, freedom to move, centre of gravity, hand holds.  Use leverage if possible Nº wires? Monitor screen is the heavy end
  • 17 You have no backbone!You have no backbone! The basic design of your body dates from when humans were four-legged animals.
  • 18 You have no backbone!You have no backbone! Your arms & shoulders, and your legs & hips form two posts of solid bone. Your spine is a flexible link between the two, but which carries little weight.
  • 19 You have no backbone!You have no backbone! Think of it like a washing line, with your vertebrae as clothes-pegs hanging from it. They are sufficient to hang one garment only but not for hanging a heavy weight or for a sudden jerk.
  • 20 Fishermen’s TalesFishermen’s Tales See how much the rod bends when even a small fish is lifted out of the water. Holding the rod takes much greater effort that you need to lift the weight of the fish. The forces on the bottom of your spine are similar when you lift a load by bending over.
  • 21 Gone fishingGone fishing If the fish was as large as they would have you believe, they certainly couldn’t have lifted it!
  • 22 Gone fishingGone fishing
  • 23 What is a slipped disc?What is a slipped disc? Why do old people shrink?
  • 24 What is a slipped disc?What is a slipped disc? The ‘disc’ between each vertebrae is a sack filled with a shock-absorbing jelly. A ‘slipped’ disc is when it has been squeezed out of position or actually ruptured. The result is that the bones grind painfully on each other whenever you move your back.
  • 25 What is a slipped disc?What is a slipped disc? Once this has happened, it may never return to normal. Permanent pain may result
  • 26 PregnantPregnant menmen The stress on your back is caused by the weight and the leverage of everything you lift - including your own body!
  • 27 PregnantPregnant menmen  beer bellies are bad for backs  big bottoms are better - they are attached to your hips, not your back (and they counterbalance anything you lift!) If you are a stone overweight, that is worse that holding a full 5 litre bottle to your stomach all day, every day!
  • 28 Learn to love your loadLearn to love your load  Hold it close to you.  Wear appropriate clothing  Wear an overall if the object is dirty  Use your chest or stomach as the 3rd point of contact for stability.
  • 29 Get a grip!Get a grip!  No sweat Sweat is a good lubricant, so you may lose your grip. If there isn’t a comfortable and secure hand-hold, wear gloves  no sharp edges or splinters  hold underneath or on a strong place
  • 30 LiftingLifting  Split the load if possible  Assess the weight, shape, freedom to move, centre of gravity, hand holds.  Use leverage if possible  Get close with feet apart  Secure grip (gloves?)  Bend knees, keep back upright  Never twist your back - do a 3-point turn.  Move smoothly - don’t jerk.  Take care when putting down
  • 31 LiftingLifting  Lift properly Yes ΝΟ!
  • 32 LiftingLifting  Lift properly  Avoid stretching Yes ΝΟ!
  • 33 CarryingCarrying CarryingCarrying
  • 34 CarryingCarrying  Use a sack barrow or trolley if possible
  • 35 CarryingCarrying  Use a sack barrow or trolley if possible  Check the route  Balance the load (2 buckets are better than one)  Grasp firmly (wear gloves?)
  • 36 CarryingCarrying  Use a sack barrow or trolley if possible  Check the route  Balance the load (2 buckets are better than one)  Grasp firmly (wear gloves?)  See ahead  Get others to hold doors open  Keep clear of obstructions  Put it down securely
  • 37 Pushing and pullingPushing and pulling Pushing andPushing and pullingpulling
  • 38 Pushing and pullingPushing and pulling  Pushing is usually better than pulling
  • 39 Pushing and pullingPushing and pulling  Pushing is usually better than pulling  See where you are going  Don’t hunch your shoulders
  • 40 Pushing and pullingPushing and pulling  Pushing is usually better than pulling  See where you are going  Don’t hunch your shoulders  Be prepared for a sudden stop
  • 41 CastorsCastors  You cannot pull a copier with 4 castors 180º from its last direction, because the castors will jam.  Only when all the castors are pointing in the right direction can you move it in the direction which you want it to go.
  • 42 CastorsCastors  You cannot pull a copier with 4 castors 180º from its last direction, because the castors will jam.  Only when all the castors are pointing in the right direction can you move it in the direction which you want it to go.  First swing each end of the machine out to turn the castors to the direction in which you want to go.  Be prepared for a sudden stop on uneven flooring or in hidden dips. 11 22 33
  • 43 Push where?Push where?  Where possible, use your thighs, hips or bottom to get something moving.  Avoid unnecessary bending over and use of your arms.
  • 44 If you do get back painIf you do get back pain If you do getIf you do get back painback pain
  • 45 If you do get back painIf you do get back pain  Check there is no spine disease (very unlikely)
  • 46 If you do get back painIf you do get back pain  Check there is no spine disease  NOT bed-rest
  • 47 If you do get back painIf you do get back pain  Check there is no spine disease  NOT bed-rest  Take pain killers  Work through it  Learn from what caused itLearn from what caused it  Change something about itChange something about it  Improve your life-style
  • 48 Why Accidents HappenWhy Accidents Happen  DDistraction  UUnfamiliarity  TTiredness  CComplacency  HHurry Don’t go ‘Dutch’ with safety!
  • 49 P.A.U.S.E.P.A.U.S.E. P.A.U.S.E. for thought  PPlan each task  AAnalyse what might happen  UUnexpected - be prepared  SSlipping, tripping & sprains  EEntanglement P.A.U.S.E. for thought ... think safety A millisecond makes all the difference
  • 50 To concludeTo conclude  Please think about what you have seen in this presentation.  Walk tall  Shoulders back  Head held high  Injuries hurt. Pain isn’t pleasant.  You have choices about your life.