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02 manual handlingtoolbox1g

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  • Your body is structurally similar to other mammals. Only limited adaptations have happened since we started to stand and move on two legs. Our back isn’t two solid hinged bones like our legs and arms. It’s over 30 small pieces with a swivel and compression joint between each. It was designed as flexible link between our front and back legs when we were on four legs chasing prey across uneven ground. Our back is strong ONLY when all the pieces of bone are stacked on top of each other and the weight is carried equally on each side of our shoulders. Bending or twisting transfers the force onto the ligaments, which are relatively weak. Sudden or excessive force can also damage the discs which provide the swivel and compression joints. Tearing these is the biggest risk for most people of permanent injury and lifetime pain.
  • “ L.I.T.E.” is the acronym to consider before lifting anything. In our jobs, we are lucky most lifting is relatively straightforward within one person’s capacity, easy to handle and in dry warm conditions. However, never be complacent! When looking at the load, think First about where and how you are going to hold it – make sure that it is a strong non-slippery place and won’t cut into your hands. Use gloves unless you decide they’re unnecessary. Second about whether it is free to move (check for wires) and if it has an unusual centre of gravity (e.g. a CRT monitor). Lastly, consider its weight and whether you can split the load or need help.
  • Talk through the text on the slide.
  • Talk through the text on the slide.
  • This summarises the main points in the previous slides. It’s a natural mistake to always try to lift something in one load. Often loads can be split into two and it’s much better to lift (and carry) them separately. When you twist your back, your spine becomes a spiral and so puts strain on the ligaments and discs. Because our back moves so easily, we misuse it. If you need to turn, keep your body facing forward and do a 3-point turn (like a car) with your feet. Take one step backwards and then one step forward in the new direction. It’s easy to do and keeps you back in its strong position.
  • 13 These diagrams illustrate the points made earlier. The top right shows that bending your knees is much better than bending over from your hips, because bending over puts great leverage and therefore strain on the bottom few discs, which is why you get back-ache at the bottom of your back. The bottom set of pictures show the best way to lift in a smooth continuous movement. The Red figure shows the danger when bending a stretching to retrieve a load under and bench or table. If the item does not slide forward easily, it can strain the person’s back. Always squat down and move the load carefully.
  • Every time that you do anything, pausing for a millisecond or two prevents complacency and ensures neither you nor anyone else gets injured – and that the job is done right first time.
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  • Every time that you do anything, pausing for a millisecond or two prevents complacency and ensures neither you nor anyone else gets injured – and that the job is done right first time.
  • Every time that you do anything, pausing for a millisecond or two prevents complacency and ensures neither you nor anyone else gets injured – and that the job is done right first time.

02 manual handlingtoolbox1g 02 manual handlingtoolbox1g Presentation Transcript

  • 1 Manual HandlingManual Handling Toolbox Talk “Supervisor assess the task that is about to be performed and take a 360 o look at the potential risks involved ensuring that those about to participate in the activity are aware of potential risks and hazards before they are affected by them’.
  • 2 Manual HandlingManual Handling  Manual Handling is using your body muscles to lift or move anything – from a pen to a machine.  Poor Manual Handling results in a large number of accidents each year and many millions of “days off” are due to back and other injuries.
  • 3 Basic rules for Safe Manual HandlingBasic rules for Safe Manual Handling  Think before lifting. Think about:  LOAD –  Where am I going to hold it?  Slippery or sharp edges? (Wear gloves?)  Is it free to move? Where is its centre of gravity?  How heavy is it?  INDIVIDUAL – Can I lift it myself safely?  TASK – What am I going to lift – to where?  ENVIRONMENT – Have I a clear safe route? Are there any slip or trip hazards?
  • 4 Good Lifting TechniqueGood Lifting Technique
  • 5 Good Lifting TechniqueGood Lifting Technique
  • 6 LiftingLifting  Split the load if possible  Assess the weight, shape, freedom to move, centre of gravity, hand holds.  Use leverage if possible  Get close with feet apart  Get a secure grip (use gloves?)  Bend knees, keep back upright  Never twist your back - do a 3-point turn.  Move smoothly - don’t jerk.  Take care when putting down
  • 7 LiftingLifting  Lift properly  Avoid stretching Yes ΝΟ!
  • 8 P.A.U.S.E.P.A.U.S.E. P.A.U.S.E. for thought  PPlan each task  AAnalyse what might happen  UUnexpected - be prepared  SSlipping, tripping & sprains  EEntanglement P.A.U.S.E. for thought ... think safety A millisecond makes all the difference
  • 9 To concludeTo conclude  Please think about what you have seen in this presentation.  Injuries hurt. Pain isn’t pleasant.  Safety = 100% concentration 100% of the time  You have choices about your life.
  • 10 FireFire  A fire requires  Fuel  Source of ignition  Air (Oxygen)  Fire prevention and extinguishing removes one or more of these. Ignition Ignition FuelFuel Oxygen Oxygen
  • 11 Fire PreventionFire Prevention  store combustible materials safely keep the lid on all containers except when removing the contents.  smoke only in safe outdoor places fully extinguish every cigarette  keep electrical equipment, cables etc in good condition  dispose of rubbish promptly and safely  keep fire doors closed
  • 12 FireFire  If you discover a fire  Raise alarm FIRST Alarms are usually near exit doors from a building and on the landings on each stairs  If the fire is in electrical equipment, unplug / switch off at isolator  Use extinguisher only if the fire is small  Smoke is toxic!  Keep a clear exit route
  • 13 FireFire  If you hear the fire alarm  Stop work immediately  Ensure walkways are clear  Switch off all equipment  Shut all windows and doors  Do NOT use lifts  Leave the building by the NEAREST exit  Follow Fire Exit signs
  • 14 FireFire  Wait at assembly area  Ensure your safety is recorded  Do NOT go back into the building until permitted to do so by a fire officer Assembly point
  • 15 Fire ExtinguishersFire Extinguishers  Water  Red all over - no other colour  Heavy !  NOT on live electrical equipment  Use upright  Remove pin, squeeze handles together  Point at BASE of fire
  • 16 Fire ExtinguishersFire Extinguishers  Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  Black area on label  Use on electrical fires  Use though openings into equipment  Not ideal for a fire in an open space (the gas will dissipate and the fire may re-ignite)  Hold cylinder or handle, NOT the horn itself  Remove pin, squeeze handles together  Noisy !
  • 17 Fire ExtinguishersFire Extinguishers  Powder  Blue area on label  Any type of fire  Use upright  Remove pin  Squeeze handles together
  • 18 Fire ExtinguishersFire Extinguishers  Foam  Cream area on label  Liquid and wood fires  Aim at back of fire
  • 19 Fire ExtinguishersFire Extinguishers  Hose reel  Open stopcock near reel: turn it fully anti-clockwise (unless automatic type)  Pull out hose  Open nozzle by turning it clockwise: spray first, turn more for jet  Aim at base of fire
  • 20 How Fires SpreadHow Fires Spread SMOKE & HEAT
  • 21 Slipping & TrippingSlipping & Tripping  Slipping and tripping are the most frequent injuries.  Don’t dismiss them as trivial - some cause serious injuries.  Look out!  Don’t rely on your route being clear - hazards change without warning.
  • 22 SlippingSlipping  Too little friction between  sole of shoe and floor / ground  rug / mat and floor  Know the warning signs & dangerous places!  Frost on car windows = ice on the ground  wet / muddy = slippery  Something on the floor: spilt liquid or a piece of paper
  • 23 SlippingSlipping  Wear appropriate footwear  How good is their grip?  Replace shoes if the tread is worn down.  Keep centre of gravity vertically above your shoes  Take smaller steps  Lift each foot up  Don’t run, corner carefully
  • 24 SlippingSlipping  Carpets, mats etc.  Must be fixed if likely to slip.  Spills  Mop them up immediately.  Display warning signs until the floor is dry.  Something dropped  Pick it up immediately.
  • 25 TrippingTripping  “Hitting something at or below ankle level”  something permanent and fixed.  something out of position.  something left lying about.  Housekeeping!
  • 26 TrippingTripping  Inattention is the cause but  speed kills!
  • 27 TrippingTripping Carpets & mats  Straighten them immediately if rucked up  Holes must be repaired without delay Cables (mains, telephone or data)  Route them away from walkways or foot-wells under desks. Use proper covers where cables are exposed.  Route temporary flexes where they won’t be a risk and remove them immediately after use.
  • 28 TrippingTripping Filing cabinets and desks  Keep drawers shut except when filing or retrieving a document. Stairs and corridors  NOTHING should be left on or near stairs  Hold the handrail on stairs  Keep corridors clear  NEVER obstruct fire exits
  • 29 TrippingTripping  Don’t trip UP!  stairs  curbs  Up or Down:  Hold the handrail  Walk, don’t run  One stair at a time  Don’t carry items that obscure your vision
  • 30 To concludeTo conclude  Please think about what you have seen in this presentation.  Injuries hurt. Pain isn’t pleasant.  Safety = 100% concentration 100% of the time
  • 31 Electrical SafetyElectrical Safety Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 32 IntroductionIntroduction  Why is electricity dangerous? Because it’s  Invisible (and odourless)  InstantInstant
  • 33 Hazards from electrical equipmentHazards from electrical equipment  Tripping  Over the equipment itself or its flex
  • 34 Hazards from electrical equipmentHazards from electrical equipment  Fire  If possible, switch off / unplug smoking or burning equipment.  If it is still live, use only CO2 or Powder extinguishers.
  • 35 Hazards from electrical equipmentHazards from electrical equipment  Electric shock  Burns  Electrocution  Never remove covers unless authorised to do so.  Always switch equipment off before removing its covers or repairing it.  Other consequential events, e.g.  scalds from overturned kettle  entanglement if a motor starts
  • 36 Safety in an office or homeSafety in an office or home  Equipment condition  no damaged covers  no missing screws  no bypassed interlocks  Equipment operation  no intermittent faults  all switches, warning lights etc. work OK
  • 37 Safety in an office or homeSafety in an office or home  Flex  not in a walkway  not loose on the floor under a desk  not where it may get damaged  not squashed, damaged nor cut  not frayed nor perished  Plug  not broken  no signs of overheating  no bent pins  Resilient type for things which are moved frequently, e.g. hand-tools vacuum cleaners / floor polishers
  • 38 Safety in an office or homeSafety in an office or home  Cord grip around the sheath  No coloured wires showing  No water / coffee / liquid ingress  Don’t spray aerosols into live equipment  Don’t use plug-in multiway adaptors  use a short 4-way extension lead instead.
  • 39 Safety in an office or homeSafety in an office or home  Use short flexes on work-top equipment  long flexes risk being pulled and overturning the item (e.g. a kettle)  Keep sockets dry  take care when washing walls  No DIY bodgesNo DIY bodges
  • 40 Protection DevicesProtection Devices  No device prevents you from getting a shock.  A Fuse or Miniature Circuit Breaker (MCB) switches off the current if it exceeds the rated value for long enough.  Plug = 3 or 13 amps (can also be 5 or 10 amps)  Lighting circuits = 5 amps (1200 watts)  Ring main for 13 amp sockets = 30 amps.  They help to prevent a fire caused by prolonged overloading of the equipment, its flex or the fixed wiring.
  • 41 Residual Current Devices (“RCD”)Residual Current Devices (“RCD”)  They detect when the current in the Live wire is different from the current in the Neutral wire.  If the difference is 30mA, they QUICKLY switch off the current. If the missing current was going through your body, it aims to switch it off before your heart stops permanently.  Use the test button regularly - make sure the device still actually works!  They are ESSENTIAL when using portable equipment outdoors or in wet / damp environments.  They are desirable in many other situations, e.g. Children poking things into anything electrical, fingers in light fittings, etc
  • 42 To concludeTo conclude  Please think about what you have seen in this presentation.  Injuries hurt. Pain isn’t pleasant. Death is final.  Safety = 100% concentration 100% of the time  You have choices about your life.
  • 43 Hazardous SubstancesHazardous Substances Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 44 Hazardous SubstancesHazardous Substances  What substances are hazardous and why?  Intrinsically hazardous e.g. Cyanide  Hazardous in certain situations, such as Place e.g. solvents in unventilated areas Temperature e.g. flammable liquids  Cause an unsafe situation e.g. Spilt oil is very slippery  Almost ALL substances have some potential to be hazardous! e.g. Nitrogen causes ‘the bends’ in divers
  • 45 Intrinsically Hazardous SubstancesIntrinsically Hazardous Substances  COSHH (Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations)  Defines a list of substances which is published annually  Regulations specify the exact symbols and words required on the container  Warning Symbols  Risk Phrases (R..)  Safety Phrases (S..)
  • 46 Warning SymbolsWarning Symbols If inhaled, ingested or penetrates the skin:  Toxic  May cause serious illness or death  Corrosive  May damage or destroy living tissue (the effect may be delayed)
  • 47 Warning SymbolsWarning Symbols  Harmful  May cause some health problems  Irritant  May cause inflammation
  • 48 Warning SymbolsWarning Symbols  Explosive  Highly or Extremely Flammable  Has a flash point (i.e. easily ignited) at room temperature or below
  • 49 Warning SymbolsWarning Symbols  Oxidizing  Supports the combustion of other substances by generating oxygen  Harmful to the environment  May cause damage to aquatic life or plants
  • 50 Risk Phrase ExamplesRisk Phrase Examples  R14: Reacts violently with water  R22: Harmful if swallowed  R36/37/38: Irritating to eyes,respiratory system and skin  R42/43: may cause sensitisation by inhalation and skin contact
  • 51 Safety Phrase ExamplesSafety Phrase Examples  S51: Use only in well-ventilated areas  The area that matters is that immediately around your head - the vapour that you breathe in.  S2: Keep out of reach of children  S20: When using, do not eat or drink  S24: Avoid contact with skin  S37/39: Wear suitable gloves and eye/face protection
  • 52 4 Mandatory Rules4 Mandatory Rules 1. Read the label and instructions 2. Do EXACTLYEXACTLY what they say  Proper use  Ventilation  No flames, smoking or sources of ignition  Wear appropriate Personal Protective Equipment  e.g. Eye protection, Correct gloves, Apron etc.  Handling and storage  Spill control  Emergency precautions and procedures
  • 53 4 Mandatory Rules4 Mandatory Rules 3. Ensure the right conditions  No distractions  No interruptions  No passers by  CONCENTRATE! 3.3. Dispose of waste correctlyDispose of waste correctly
  • 54 3 more points3 more points  Never transfer a hazardous substance to another container unless it is designed and labelled correctly.  Keep containers tightly closed  It is the invisible vapour from a solvent or other petroleum-based product which is even more dangerous than the liquid.  It is heavier than air and may be ignited by a spark or flame some distance from the liquid.  It may build up to dangerous concentrations where there is little airflow.
  • 55 3 more points3 more points  Changing a gas cylinder (inc BBQ etc)  A small leak can produce a large volume of gas, which can cause an explosion or a fierce fire  Change or connect the cylinder to an appliance in the open air  Never have a naked flame near an gas cylinder which is being changed  Check hoses regularly  Store spare cylinders outside, but not below ground level  Lock cylinders away from children
  • 56 P.A.U.S.E.P.A.U.S.E. P.A.U.S.E. for thought  PPlan each task  AAnalyse what might happen  UUnexpected - be prepared  SSlipping, tripping & sprains  EEntanglement P.A.U.S.E. for thought ... think safety A millisecond makes all the difference
  • 57 To concludeTo conclude  Please think about what you have seen in this presentation.  Injuries hurt. Pain isn’t pleasant.  Safety = 100% concentration 100% of the time  You have choices about your life.
  • 58 NoiseNoise Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 59 NoiseNoise    Loud noise from ANY source can damage your hearing. 
  • 60 NoiseNoise Hearing protection mandatory Background noise should allow normal conversation 2 metres from the other person. If you have to raise your voice to be heard, it is too loud. Loud noise can break or damage the sensitive hairs and membranes in your inner ears. Your body can’t regrow or replace them, so they no longer accurately convert the noise pressure waves to brain signals.
  • 61 Types of hearing protectionTypes of hearing protection Ear muffs Ear plugs Corded ear plugs Banded ear caps Whichever type you use, it must fit properly and seal completely, otherwise its effectiveness will be reduced.
  • 62 Things which reduce effectivenessThings which reduce effectiveness Torn covering Creases Loss of tension Obstructions  Correct insertion  Incorrect. Insufficient insertion
  • 63 NoiseNoise  Hearing loss can be permanent.  It usually builds up over many years, or it can be caused by a sudden explosive noise e.g. from a gun or cartridge- operated tool.  Damage can be caused by any loud noise  Music through headphones from MP3 players and I-pods can be damagingly loud inside your ears.  Temporary deafness after leaving a noisy area is a signal that action needs to be taken.  Wear ear protection for any noisy task or in any noisy area, and ensure that it fits correctly.
  • 64 Work Equipment & Risk AssessmentWork Equipment & Risk Assessment Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 65 Work EquipmentWork Equipment  Know the safe way to use every tool and piece of equipment.  Use every item safely and only for its proper purpose.  Ensure all guards and covers are in place. Ensure that you leave it in a safe condition and in a safe place after each use.  Maintain each item properly.  Mark and remove defective equipment.
  • 66 Risk AssessmentRisk Assessment  A logical review of the hazards and risks of the process.  Hazard = what could cause injury.  Risk = probability that it will happen.  Aim:  Remove or reduce the hazards Consider alternative processes or ways to achieve the desired result.  Reduce the risks.
  • 67 Personal Protective EquipmentPersonal Protective Equipment  It is the last resort to reduce the risk when every other practicable preventive measure has been taken.  Must be suitable for that individual.  Must be kept in good condition.  The work procedure must be defined and followed exactly.
  • 68 Personal Protective EquipmentPersonal Protective Equipment Head and Neck Hardhats: protection from falling objects (construction sites) Bump Caps: protection from head impacts with stationary obstacles (pipes and ductwork in plant rooms) Whole Body Foul Weather Clothing: protection from cold and wet Coverall and Aprons: protection from impact, spray, splashing High visibility vests / jackets: dangerous environments (e.g. loading bays, roadways) Feet Safety Shoes or Boots: protection from cuts, crushing, impact, slips, electrostatic discharge Wellington boots: protection from chemicals and wet Face and Eyes Face Shields, goggles or safety spectacles: protection from chemicals splashing, projectiles and dust Breathing: Mouth and Nose Filter Mask: protection from particulate, dust, vapours Respirators: protection from fumes, gas, lack of oxygen Hands and Arms Gloves or Gauntlets: protection from extremes of hot and cold, cuts and abrasions, infections, chemicals
  • 69 P.A.U.S.E.P.A.U.S.E. P.A.U.S.E. for thought  PPlan each task  AAnalyse what might happen  UUnexpected - be prepared  SSlipping, tripping & sprains  EEntanglement P.A.U.S.E. for thought ... think safety A millisecond makes all the difference
  • 70 To concludeTo conclude  Please think about what you have seen in this presentation.  Injuries hurt. Pain isn’t pleasant.  Safety = 100% concentration 100% of the time  You have choices about your life.
  • 71 StressStress Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 72 Stress ControlStress Control Stress is pressure that we come across in our daily lives and it is normal. Too much stress can cause problems. It may be due to a combination of personal and work factors. Maintain good health habits  stay active - take regular exercise  eat breakfast and a balanced diet  get enough sleep  don’t over-use alcohol, sleeping pills or medicines.
  • 73 Stress ControlStress Control  Use your time wisely  don’t overdo it - set achievable goals  don’t put things off  make a list and prioritise actions  take short breaks - go for a walk at lunch-time
  • 74 Stress ControlStress Control  Improve your work habits  identify what you must do  allow time to catch up on routine tasks  follow safety procedures - avoid injury  discuss problems with your manager or colleagues - there may be ways to reduce your problems  be positive
  • 75 Stress ControlStress Control  Change personal habits  acknowledge every success  talk about problems to someone  do things you enjoy; plan your leisure time  stop smoking and reduce caffeine intake  try to live in the present  seek new interests - meet new people
  • 76 Stress ControlStress Control  Learn to relax  do breathing and stretching exercises  imagine a calm, peaceful place.
  • 77 Environmental ImpactEnvironmental Impact Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 78 Environmental ImpactEnvironmental Impact  Pollution:  To the air e.g. Acid rain, fumes, smell, Ozone layer damage, dust, aerosol droplets, fires, CO2, light, noise etc.  To land e.g. spillage, fly-tipping, waste disposal, fertilisers, agricultural chemicals, etc  To water e.g. run-off of chemicals from land into rivers, chemicals seeping into aquifers through land, contaminated waste water.
  • 79 Environmental ImpactEnvironmental Impact
  • 80 Environmental impactEnvironmental impact
  • 81 Environmental ImpactEnvironmental Impact  Reduce  Energy use: switch off everything which is not in use.  Materials: right first time, no excess, two-sided copying, minimise waste.  Repair  Don’t throw things away unnecessarily.  Reuse  In its original form: yourself or by others.  Recycle  Recover the raw materials for re-use or transforming to something usable (e.g. compost, fuel etc).
  • 82 Environmental ImpactEnvironmental Impact No-one here – why are the lights on? Dripping tap! I’m wasting up to £700 a year Don’t bin it ...recycle it I’m no mug - you can use me again
  • 83 Electrostatic DischargeElectrostatic Discharge Electro- Static Discharge This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 84 Electrostatic DischargeElectrostatic Discharge You may notice it as a spark:  from your finger to the door frame when you get out of the car  from your finger to any earthed metalwork - e.g. copier  when stroking a cat Electro- Static Discharge
  • 85 Electrostatic DischargeElectrostatic Discharge Causes:  Charge builds up when certain materials rub together  e.g. between your body and your clothes, and between one item and another  man-made fibres (e.g. Nylon) are worse than cotton  Damp air is slightly conductive, so the charge leaks away  Dry air is an insulator, so the charge builds up
  • 86 Electrostatic DischargeElectrostatic Discharge  Electronic components have tiny elements, so they are VERY easily damaged by electrical discharges.  Damage can occur even when there isn’t a spark.
  • 87 Electrostatic DischargeElectrostatic Discharge  NEVER touch electronic components or printed circuit boards.  NEVER open boxes or bags which have the ESD warning sign.  Anyone who needs to touch or work with electronic components MUST use an approved safety wristband and an earthed work-mat.
  • 88 Information SecurityInformation Security Toolbox Talk This document is made available on the condition that it is used solely to assist you in the preparation of your own safety training material. Use for resale or similar commercial activity to third parties is strictly forbidden. This document was produced for our internal use only, and therefore it may not be suitable or sufficient for your purposes. No guarantees whatsoever can be given as to their legal compliance or comprehensiveness, and you are responsible for obtaining professional advice and verification as to the correctness or suitability of any training or documents which you produce which are based wholly or in part on these. No liabilities whatsoever are accepted. It has been made available purely for information to others who may find them useful when formulating their own safety training and procedures. © A. Groves & Océ (UK) Ltd
  • 89 Rule 1Rule 1  Always keep to our Policies  Keep to our information security policies.  Obey the customer’s information security rules.  Respect the law and privacy legislation.  Use approved hardware and licensed software only.
  • 90 Rule 2Rule 2  Handle information with care  Keep your desk / work area clear.  Keep confidential information protected (under lock & key) during breaks and when going home.  Remove printed matter from printers, copiers and faxes immediately  Dispose of documents and digital media securely
  • 91 Rule 3Rule 3  Keep your passwords and PINs secret  Use quality passwords and PINs, and change them regularly  Keep your password and PINs secure and don’t share them with anyone.  Use password-protected screensavers.  Log off and switch the PC off before going home.
  • 92 Rule 4Rule 4  Know whom you’re dealing with  Exercise caution in conversations and professional interactions.  Ensure that you know who you are communicating with on the phone, the internet or via e-mail.  Use your best professional judgement when getting or giving information. Not everything is true.
  • 93 Rule 5Rule 5  Use e-mail and the Internet with care  Use e-mail and the Internet primarily for business purposes.  Don’t open any strange e-mails or attachments and be careful when downloading information.  Don’t send strictly confidential information via e-mail unless it is encrypted.  Don’t access, download, store and send illegal or offensive materials.
  • 94 Rule 6Rule 6  Pay attention to physical security and mobile equipment  Escort guests and make sure they wear their visitor badges.  Question strangers about their presence in your department.  Protect your mobile equipment with a password or PIN and don’t leave it unattended.  Avoid the use of non-company equipment on the company network.
  • 95 Rule 7Rule 7  Report incidents like viruses, thefts and losses.  Report suspicious activity at your workstation / area immediately.  Report all security incidents like thefts, losses, etc. to your manager and security co-ordinator.