Significance presentation

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Presentation to Murdoch University Tourism Students

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  • The Venice Charter of 1964 has the first mention cultural significance in Article 1 Report of the National Estate: Report of the Committee of Enquiry into the National Estate, Justice Robert Marsden Hope, Australian Government Publishing Service 1974, Chapter 1, paragraphs 1.3 and 1.4 mention International Significance and National Value The Pigott Report of 1975 mentions material of national significance in an Australian institution The Burra Charter first adopted in 1979 – the Australia ICOMOS Charter for the Conservation of places of cultural significance AICCM Code of Ethics – 1986 – conservation for preserving culturally significant qualities of objects Anderson Report Heritage Collections in Australia – 3 parts to report produced in 1991, 1992 and 1993 for the Heritage Collections Working Group, National Centre for Australian Studies at Monash University Illustrated Burra Charter: making good decisions about the care of important places , Peter Marquis-Kyle and Meredith Walker, first published 1992
  • Significance presentation

    1. 1. Significance
    2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Definition </li></ul><ul><li>Historical development </li></ul><ul><li>Uses </li></ul><ul><li>Significance Assessment </li></ul>
    3. 3. Origins <ul><li>Report on Enquiry into the National Estate 1974 </li></ul><ul><li>Pigott Report 1975 </li></ul><ul><li>Burra Charter 1979 </li></ul><ul><li>AICCM Code of Ethics 1986 </li></ul><ul><li>Anderson Reports on Heritage Collections in Australia, 1991-3 </li></ul><ul><li>Illustrated Burra Charter 1992 </li></ul><ul><li>Significance, 2001 </li></ul><ul><li>Significance 2.0, 2009 </li></ul>
    4. 4. Definition <ul><li>Significance refers to the values and meanings that items and collections have for people and communities. Significance helps unlock the potential of collections, creating opportunities for communities to access and enjoy collections, and to understand the history, cultures and environments of Australia. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Significance 2.0 </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Undertaking a Significance Assessment <ul><li>A qualified historian, curator or archivist </li></ul><ul><li>Will assess your collections significance by considering its history and comparing it to other similar collections </li></ul><ul><li>Produce a report which provides a list of prioritised recommendations for the future use and interpretation of your collection. </li></ul><ul><li>These recommendations form a good list of tasks/projects for future grant applications </li></ul>
    6. 6. Components <ul><li>Historic </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetic </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul><ul><li>Authenticity / Provenance </li></ul><ul><li>Rarity </li></ul><ul><li>Representativeness </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity </li></ul>
    7. 7. Historic <ul><li>Does your collection have an association with significant people, places or events? </li></ul>
    8. 8. Aesthetic <ul><li>Does your collection contain objects of outstanding craftsmanship, style, technical excellence or quality of design? </li></ul>
    9. 9. Scientific or Research <ul><li>Does your collection have the potential for further examination or study or could it influence existing research? </li></ul>
    10. 10. Social or Spiritual <ul><li>Does your collection contain objects that are highly regarded in your community for their social, spiritual or cultural connections? </li></ul>
    11. 11. Comparison with other collections <ul><li>Provenance </li></ul><ul><li>Representativeness </li></ul><ul><li>Rarity </li></ul><ul><li>Condition </li></ul>
    12. 12. Uses
    13. 13. Case Study

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