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Renee Anderson, Techniques for prioritizing, road-mapping, and staffing your web site: a feature prioritization primer
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Renee Anderson, Techniques for prioritizing, road-mapping, and staffing your web site: a feature prioritization primer

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A presentation from Museums and the Web 2009....

A presentation from Museums and the Web 2009.

Maybe you’re supposed to overhaul your institution’s Web site. Or maybe you’ve been directed to visualize and implement new on-line initiatives. Other than knowing your stakeholders’ wish lists and extensive ideas for Web site content and features – from blogs to on-line collections – you don’t have a clear plan of action. You don’t even have a defense strategy for why or why not to invest in some of their requests. How, then, can your team drive decision-making? How can you get features implemented based on rational reasons, while balancing institutional goals and audience needs – all without going over budget? This mini-workshop will focus on an often-overlooked core Web site activity: the Feature Prioritization Workshop. You will be introduced to prioritization techniques and tools, how and when to use them, methods for navigating the myriad needs and wants of stakeholders, and some approaches for achieving compromise. You will learn to balance “requirements” with “desires” by using concrete proof points and a convincing defense. And you will also learn about building a phased roadmap that will accommodate the immediate needs of your organization at launch, yet will provide a plan for future iterations and builds.

Mini-Workshop: Redesign: Prioritizing [Mini-Workshop]

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Renee Anderson, Techniques for prioritizing, road-mapping, and staffing your web site: a feature prioritization primer Renee Anderson, Techniques for prioritizing, road-mapping, and staffing your web site: a feature prioritization primer Presentation Transcript

  • useums and the Web 2009 echniques for prioritizing, road-mapping, and staffing your web site: feature prioritization primer
  • hat we’ll do today . Introduction I. Define what a feature is II. Why and when to prioritize features V. Analyze a couple of features together (10 minutes) . Break into groups and prioritize the features (20 minutes) I. Reconvene and share decisions (10 minutes)
  • hat is a feature, when it’s on a web site? 1. Something self-contained and interactive: • A simple tool • A widget • A module, or part of a module, that displays stuff
  • hat is a feature, when it’s on a web site? simple tool: adding specific content to your calendar, or sharing content n Facebook (or Digg, or del.icio.us)
  • hat is a feature, when it’s on a web site? A widget: a poll that dynamically displays your vote
  • hat is a feature, when it’s on a web site? module, or part of a module: interactive areas of site pages, sometimes ith sub-sections, with its own unique content and/or functionality
  • his is also a feature 2. Search: it’s actually a large set of sub-features • The interface (simple vs. advanced? What are the most important facets? • The results (what order do they appear in? how many will display on eac page?) • Manipulating the results (are they sortable? filterable?) • The metadata (how are the results categorized and mapped to the web s as a whole?) • The post-search (can a user save their results, or share them with someon • SEO (how will my stuff display in Google, and do I need to create optimiz landing pages?)
  • earch popular search engine ww.google.com
  • earch ustomizable Results ww.google.com, logged-in state
  • earch contextually relevant search engine aggregator ww.kayak.com
  • earch contextually relevant search engine aggregator ww.kayak.com
  • hese should be considered features 3. Content is no longer static • Digital media: a video, a podcast, or an interactive contained experience • User generated: Uploaded photos, comments, projects and groups • Dynamic: auto-generated based on rules and categories
  • o really, “feature” is just a fancy name for all the tuff you can see on a web site.
  • o how do you prioritize all this stuff? eature prioritization is a method for balancing multiple nputs from different groups of people, elevating the useful nd important features while pushing back irrelevant or overly omplicated ideas. Stakeholders Users Engineers
  • he most important aspect is... ..getting representatives from these three groups in the same oom, discussing and debating features and content and istening to each other. Stakeholders Users Engineers
  • hen should it be done? •Early! •Before committing to any design ideas •Ideally, after thinking through how some of the stuff might work
  • ow is it done? It’s about ranking. From a stakeholder perspective, important items are ranked high, and less important items are ranked lower. Stakeholders Questions to consider: •Will a feature support the institution’s mission? •Will a feature support new or existing initiatives? •Will a feature elevate the institution’s brand or outward communications? •Will a feature improve internal workflow?
  • ow is it done? It’s about ranking. From a user perspective, desirable and useful ite are ranked high, and less desirable or useful items are ranked lower. Users Questions to consider: •Will a feature solve a user’s problem? •Will a feature add value to the user? •Will a feature make something easier to use or d on the site? •Will a feature enhance your audience’s relationsh to the institution?
  • ow is it done? It’s about ranking. From an engineer’s perspective, easy and quick to implement items are ranked high. Hard to implement (or time consuming) items ar Engineers ranked low. Questions to consider: •Is a feature supported by your existing technical environment? •How much training will be involved? •What contingencies need to be in place for the feature to work? •How much customization is involved, and how will this be affected when upgrading? •Are there open source and free services already
  • hat does ranking end up looking like? e often use the following very simple scale (remember, this is NO cientific and doesn’t pretend to be): •Institutional importance: 5=high, 1=low •Audience importance: 5=high, 1=low •Technical implementation: 5=simple, 1=difficult So when tackling your new search feature set, sub-features may e up looking like this: Feature Name Institutional Rank Audience Rank Technical Rank Average Simple keyword search 5 5 4 (4+5+2) / 3 = 4. Auto-suggest terms and 4 5 1 (4+5+1) / 3 = 3. phrases (like Google)
  • eature #1: collection www.dominomag.com) Controlled and owned by logged-in ember Clippings of images from articles Categorizing into folders Adding notes and tags Sharing with friends
  • eature #1: collection www.flickr.com) Photo collections mapped to physical ocations Dynamic pages generated from site- ide member uploads View by “interestingness” or time Acts as a hub for all people, photos, ags, and content related to that ocation
  • rainstorm: What features could be in a museum nline collection? • Interactive • Sets of related sub-features • Content
  • eature #2: calendar www.google.com) Looks like a calendar! Make public or private Import other Google alendars into interface Export to other alendar programs Different views (day, eek, month)
  • eature #2: calendar www.flickr.com) Integrate images into a ypical calendar view Based on popularity “interestingness”) for ny particular day Supports exploration ver usefulness
  • eature #2: calendar www.istanbulmodern.org/en/f_index.html) Unusual layout in imeline format Acts as site navigation Sub-grouped by event ype
  • rainstorm #2: What features could be in a useum’s calendar of programs and events? • Interactive • Sets of related sub-features • Content
  • reak into smaller groups ou will represent: Stakeholders Users Engineers ick one of the feature sets: Online collection Calendar rioritize the features using the worksheet I’ve given you. ome back as a group and share some of the thinking.
  • hank you! Hot Studio, Inc. 585 Howard Street, 1st Floor 5 Union Square West, 4 San Francisco, California 94105 New York, New York 10 415.284.7250 212.242.1082