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MW2010: H. Wechsler: Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills, an IMLS Report
 

MW2010: H. Wechsler: Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills, an IMLS Report

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A presentation from Museums and the Web 2010....

A presentation from Museums and the Web 2010.

This session will introduce and discuss a recent IMLS report, "Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills,". This report includes a self-assessment tool that enables museums and libraries to position themselves on a 21st century skills/community engagement continuum. Of course, the use of digital technologies and media play a big role in the report and the recommendations. IMLS took this on because the current 21st century skills national/international conversations tend to focus on the workforce, higher education, or K-12. The potential of museums and libraries to contribute to proficiency in many of these skills - in the out-of-school environment and in partnership with formal education or business-has been absent from these conversations.

We had a distinguished task force of museum and library leaders who helped guide our work, and we vetted various drafts with different museum and library groups. We see the project as a beginning - and will be offering grants in all of our programs that enable museums and libraries to explore their roles as 21st century learning institutions.

Report available from: http://www.imls.gov/pdf/21stCenturySkills.pdf

Briefing: 21st Century Skills: An IMLS Report [organizations]

see http://www.archimuse.com/mw2010/abstracts/prg_335002358.html

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  • This effort began with a few realizations: that museums needed to be part of this 21 st Century Skills conversation that had started without us; that while the conversation’ began with a focus on K-12, museums and libraries were perfectly positions to meet the 21 st century skills needs of their communities – and indeed, already were; and that stakeholders and policy makers needed to know how museums are part of this enterprise
  • I don’t know about you but it seems like what had been a specialized field of study – futurism – is now one that we are all supposed to dabble in if we want to succeed leaders. I was fascinated when conferences started featuring futurists who would talk about trends – demographic, economic, societal – and make predictions about how those trends would shape the future in 10, 20, 50 years. Now it seems that we are all being called upon to imagine the future as we make decisions for today. It is common knowledge that: We function in a globalized economy Technology constantly changes the way we live, learn, work, and play That our growing use of resources is taking a toll on our planet; and that We need new skills to compete in this global economy and to sustain our planet We use this knowledge as we make decisions for today. Being a futurist is the new normal. Our professional associations and government agencies reinforce this focus.
  • AAM’s Center for the Future of Museums (CFM) helps museums explore the cultural, political and economic challenges facing society and devise strategies to shape a better tomorrow. CFM is a think-tank and research and design lab for fostering creativity and helping museums transcend traditional boundaries to serve society in new ways One of the first things CFM did was to commission a trends paper called Museums and Society 2034 outlining trends and extrapolating the implications for museums.
  • IMLS recently published The Future of Museums and Libraries: A Discussion Guide, the results of a two-day meeting of a diverse group of museum, library, education, and technology professionals. It calls for museums to take a proactive and positive stance in facing the challenges and opportunities of the 21 st Century and it presents 9 themes for discussion. [Refer to publication for list] IMLS recently launched its first Wiki – UpNext: the future of Museums and Libraries. Every two weeks, UpNext will host discussion on two of these themes. So now its time for you to practice your futurist skills. We are going to do a quick exercise developed by Bernie Trilling and Charles Fadel [show book]. I’m going to ask you 4 questions, give you a few minutes to discuss each of them at your table, then we’ll shout out some answers.
  • Think of a kindergartener – your own kid, niece, nephew, grandchild, friend – and imagine what the world will be like in 20 years or so when this child has left school and is out in the world.
  • What skills will that child need to be successful in this world you have imagined 20 years from now?
  • Now think about your own life and the times when you were really learning, so much and so deeply, that you would call these the “peak learning experiences” of your life. What were the conditions that made your high-performance learning experience powerful?
  • What would your institution be like if it were designed around your answers to the first three questions?
  • See, you already are futurists. [Highlight observations of the group that fit within the table] This is a table from the IMLS Report Museum, Libraries, and 21 st Century Skills which you all have. It helps set the stage for the discussions in the report. The next table highlights some of the changes that are already taking place in museums The report also lists implication for museums.
  • Shift in authority
  • AAM’s new Museum Financial Information Survey reports that one in five museums have no collections.
  • Institutions are experimenting with open source planning and programming Social media
  • It not only about what you have but what you do with it.
  • Its not just about memorizing facts but learning to think critically, solve problems, etc. (we’ll get to these 21 st century skills in a moment)
  • Times are tough for nonprofits. Some say there are simply too many to be supported by the philanthropic resources and market out there. One solution is to act collaboratively, pooling resources when possible and increasing impact by finding intersections with other organizations in mission and goals.
  • Gone are the days when a museum’s neighborhood and its audience were completely disconnected. Today, museums must be part of their neighborhoods, though the “community” they serve might be much wider, even global.
  • Not only are we more intentional and purposeful about learning outcomes, but that implies that we figure out how to measure them to demonstrate our value.
  • So on to these 21 st century skills – you noted many of them as you listed what your kindergartener would need in the workplace. Indeed, these are the very skills that have been identified as required for workforce development. They were developed by the Partnership for 21 st Century Skills, a group of leaders from education, business, and community organizations that has been working on this topic for about 8 years. Our Task Force of museum and library professionals refocused the skills for our communities P21 uses this rainbow framework to describe how the skills themes and subjects rest on one another.
  • The core subjects – reading, writing, arithmetic – join with the 21 st century themes – global awareness, financial, civic, health, and environmental literacy – to form the rainbows inner arch.
  • Resting on top, are the 21 st century skill sets – Life and career skills, which are talking about adapting to changes in roles, jobs schedules, contexts, dealing with ambiguity, taking criticism and feedback, managing goals and time, working independently or in teams when needed, working effectively with all kinds of people, producing results, guiding others.
  • Learning and innovation skills Be able to reason, use system thinking, solve problems Think creatively using ideas and data work creatively with others Interpret, recognize, understand actions, symbols, objects demonstrate imagination and curiosity be able to apply knowledge from across disciplines in effective ways.
  • Information, Media and Technology Skills Access, evaluate, use and manage information from a wide variety of sources. Analyze media and create media products Apply technology as a tool, use digital technologies, communication/networking tools, and social networks to successfully function in a knowledge economy
  • Support museums and public libraries in envisioning and defining their roles as institutions of learning in the 21 st century by providing tools and resources; Enhance understanding and build awareness among policymakers and other stakeholders about the integral roles museums and libraries play in creating an engaged citizenry and a competitive workforce and the unique value museums bring to the nation’s learning systems.
  • Allows self-assessment (early, transitional, 21 st century) across four key areas: Institutional Assets (human resources, collections, programs, physical facilities, and information technologies) Leadership & Management Partnering (community organizations, businesses, schools and other cultural institutions) Accountability There is also an community learning scan which starts you thinking about what your communities needs are, which are relevant to your mission, what organizations in your community are focusing on these skills (and thus might be good partners). This project will help museum leaders: Envision and position their institutions in the 21 st century learning landscape Inventory the 21 st century skills and practices currently in use Identify goals for future operation and program improvements Build public awareness about the unique value these institutions provide to the nation’s learning systems
  • Community Workshops To bring together museums, libraries, educational and other community groups to conduct a community learning scan and think about their roles and the possibilities for working together. Webinars To extend the reach of the workshops Expanded Web Content More resources Contest Help collect and disseminate promising practices
  • The President Department of Education Department of Labor 14 states – curriculum, standards, assessment Your funders Your potential partners Your community
  •     ENGAGE WITH COMMUNITY. Complete the community learning scan (Insert Page Ref) to better understand the library/museum position in the community’s learning system, prioritize the 21 st century skills, and identify potential partnerships. Then, continue to work with community organizations to align the institution’s efforts with community needs. Developing and sustaining an ongoing awareness of what the community needs, how these needs are changing and what partnerships are most strategic will help focus, prioritize, and leverage the museum/library’s approach to 21 st century skills. ESTABLISH THE VISION. Develop a 21 st century vision for the institution’s role in the learning systems of the community. Museum and library leaders can articulate the value of the institution’s participation in the dialogue around 21 st century skills to staff, board members, volunteers, and the public. The institution’s vision, mission, and values are crucial to setting a comprehensive frame for 21 st century learning work. Only when the museum/library articulates its vision for 21 st century skills in ways that are aligned with the community’s needs can effective partnerships and audience engagement strategies be fully leveraged. ASSESS CURRENT STATUS. Use the self-assessment tool (insert page Ref) to create a current 21 st century skills analysis of your institution. It is critical to understand what the museum/library is already doing vis-à-vis 21 st century skills and audiences so that a future path can be charted for the museum/library IMPLEMENT A PRIORITIZED PLAN. After the institution has scanned the community, established the vision and analyzed its current status, an action plan should be developed and implemented to include the following: the skills the museum/library will prioritize in its operations; the partners that should be engaged to better align and leverage the museum/library’s activities; target audiences; new and existing resources needed to implement the plan; a timeline; and methods to track progress and improve the initiative over time. FOCUS ON COMPREHENSIVE ALIGNMENT. Library and museum leaders should align the institution’s vision and goals for 21 st century skills with key organizational areas such as: leadership and resources (e.g., the institution’s strategic planning/resource allocation processes), institutional assets (e.g., facilities, information technology, programs, collections, human capital), partnering strategies, and accountability systems. TRACK AND COMMUNICATE PROGRESS. Use the principles outlined in this report and the self-assessment tool to monitor progress around 21 st century skills goals, and communicate this progress to audiences, partners, community leaders, and policymakers. The ability to implement the vision and document results that strengthen the community’s overall approach to learning in the 21 st century is a powerful leadership opportunity for museums and libraries.

MW2010: H. Wechsler: Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills, an IMLS Report MW2010: H. Wechsler: Museums, Libraries, and 21st Century Skills, an IMLS Report Presentation Transcript

  • Museums and the Web 2010 Annual Conference Helen J. Wechsler, Senior Program Officer
  • Become a Futurist
  • Become a Futurist
  • Become a Futurist
  • What will the world be like…
  • What skills will they need…
  • What conditions made you REALLY learn…
  • What would your institution be like if it were… … designed around your answers to the first three questions?
  • 21 st Century Societal Shifts 20 th Century 21 st Century Number Jobs / Lifetime 1-2 jobs 10-15 jobs Job Requirement Mastery of one field Simultaneous mastery of many rapidly changing fields Job competition Local Global Work Model Routine, hands-on, fact based Non-routine, technical, creative, interactive Education Model Institution centered, formal degree attainment is primary goal Learner centered, self-directed and lifelong knowledge, and skill acquisition are primary goals Organizational Culture Top down Multi-directional (bottom-up, top down, side to side, etc.)
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements)
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements) Focus on presentation and display Focus on audience engagement and experiences
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements) Focus on presentation and display Focus on audience engagement and experiences Emphasis on enhancing knowledge Emphasis on enhancing knowledge and 21 st century skills
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements) Focus on presentation and display Focus on audience engagement and experiences Emphasis on enhancing knowledge Emphasis on enhancing knowledge and 21 st century skills Acts independently Acts in highly collaborative partnerships
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements) Focus on presentation and display Focus on audience engagement and experiences Emphasis on enhancing knowledge Emphasis on enhancing knowledge and 21 st century skills Acts independently Acts in highly collaborative partnerships Located in community (operates independently) Embedded in community (aligned with and acts as a leader on community needs/issues)
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements) Focus on presentation and display Focus on audience engagement and experiences Emphasis on enhancing knowledge Emphasis on enhancing knowledge and 21 st century skills Acts independently Acts in highly collaborative partnerships Located in community (operates independently) Embedded in community (aligned with and acts as a leader on community needs/issues) Learning outcomes assumed, implied (content knowledge and skills like critical thinking tend to be byproducts of programming) Learning outcomes purposeful (content knowledge and 21 st century skills like critical thinking are visible, intentional outcomes of audience experiences)
  • Implications for Museums & Libraries 20 th Century Museum/Library 21 st Century Museum/Library Primarily content-driven Combination of audience- and content-driven Mostly tangible objects (e.g., art, books) Combination of tangible and digital objects One-way information (institution presents information to audiences) Multi-directional (co-created experiences involving institution, audiences and others in diverse arrangements) Focus on presentation and display Focus on audience engagement and experiences Emphasis on enhancing knowledge Emphasis on enhancing knowledge and 21 st century skills Acts independently Acts in highly collaborative partnerships Located in community (operates independently) Embedded in community (aligned with and acts as a leader on community needs/issues) Learning outcomes assumed, implied (content knowledge and skills like critical thinking tend to be byproducts of programming) Learning outcomes purposeful (content knowledge and 21 st century skills like critical thinking are visible, intentional outcomes of audience experiences) Institution leads content development (e.g. content tightly edited and controlled) Content co-created among diverse partners and audiences; accessible in multiple ways
  • 21 st Century Skills
  • What are 21 st Century Skills?
    •  
    • 21 st Century Themes
    • Global Awareness
    • Financial Literacy
    • Civic Literacy
    • Health Literacy
    • Environmental Literacy
  • What are 21 st Century Skills?
    • Life & Career Skills
    • Flexibility & Adaptability
    • Initiative & Self-Direction
    • Social & Cross-Cultural Skills
    • Productivity & Accountability
    • Leadership & Responsibility
    •  
  • What are 21 st Century Skills?
    • Learning & Innovation Skills
    • Critical Thinking & Problem Solving
    • Creativity & Innovation
    • Communication & Collaboration
    • Visual Literacy
    • Scientific & Numerical Literacy
    • Cross-Disciplinary Thinking
    • Basic Literacy
    •  
  • What are 21 st Century Skills?
    • Information, Media &
    • Technology Skills
    • Information Literacy
    • Media Literacy
    • Information, Communications &
    • Technology Literacy
  • Goals
    • Support museums
    • Enhance understanding and build awareness
  • Support Museums
    • Museums, Libraries, and 21 st Century Skills Report
    • Self-Assessment Tool
    • Online Self-Assessment Tool: www.imls21stcenturyskills.org
  • Support Museums – Next Phase
    • Community Workshops
    • Webinars
    • Expanded Web Content
    • Contest
  • Enhance Understanding & Build Awarness
    • “ I'm calling on our nation's governors and state education chiefs to develop standards and assessments that don't simply measure whether students can fill in a bubble on a test, but whether they possess 21 st century skills like problem-solving and critical thinking and entrepreneurship and creativity.”
    • — President Barack Obama
  • Six Steps to Build Momentum
    • Engage with community
    • Establish the vision
    • Assess current status
    • Implement a prioritized plan
    • Focus on comprehensive alignment
    • Track and communicate progress
  • IMLS Welcomes Proposals
    • National Leadership Grants
    • Museums for America
    • 21st Century Museum Professional
    • www.imls.gov
  • Key Thoughts
    • All libraries and museums—and the people they serve—stand to benefit from becoming more intentional and purposeful about accommodating the lifelong learning needs of people in the 21st century, and doing this work collaboratively in alignment with community needs.