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MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones
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MW2011: K. Fushimi, Design of an Appreciation Support System for Public Art Using Mobile Phones

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The purpose of this study is the development of a navigation system that will help enhance appreciation for urban art by connecting viewers with other people’s thoughts and opinions of art pieces. …

The purpose of this study is the development of a navigation system that will help enhance appreciation for urban art by connecting viewers with other people’s thoughts and opinions of art pieces. Hiroshima, located in western Japan, has many works of public art that have assumed a theme of peace. However, in Japan, it seems that the appreciation of art is restricted to the elite, and the majority of people do not seem interested enough to visit art museums. We have designed a system that allows users to share an appreciation of public art in urban spaces by using their mobile phones.

The main characteristics of this study were to build a system that:

induced a positive appreciation among users
enabled the sharing of text and images
heightened user-experience through involvement
was based on User-centered design and had provisions for color blindness.
The system which we have designed has been tested and improved on three occasions to date and is targeted at those who have few opportunities to appreciate art. The repetition of this experiment within the confines of Hiroshima City, found that the experience of public art was enhanced through the use of this mobile phone system. These results would seem to indicate that public art pieces do benefit the average person who rarely visits museums in a positive way.

A presentation from Museums and the Web 2011 (MW2011).

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  • \n
  • I am Kiyoka Fushimi, and this is Karin Barac who will be speaking today about increasing art appreciation.\n\n
  • Since 2003 my team and I have been working on a system to make art appreciation more accessible to the average person. \n\nWe have moved beyond the idea of the traditional guide which is usually passive to something that is active for the viewer. Initially, the system allowed for the reading and adding comments about art pieces. It is hoped that being able to read and share opinions on art pieces can enable users to reach a positive appreciation of art.\n \nIn the most recent iteration we moved outside of museums to focus on public art where the whole city is regarded as an art museum. \nAnd allowed users to add data to designated art pieces and to add art pieces and appreciation data creating on online “art gallery”.\n\n
  • User Centered Design and User Experience guided the development of the system.\n\nIn the case of a usual encounter with a piece of art, a person cannot know the experiences that other people have had with the piece. \nThe social media aspect in that users create profiles that are searchable, therefore a user can gain a feeling of accomplishment of being involved in a larger community as their collection of contributions grows.\n\n・User friendly\n・Use of pictograms due to limited screen real-estate\n・Allowing for color blindness and for outdoor viewing of the screen\n \n\n
  • Users access information of artworks with their mobile phones through a QR Code located near the artwork.\n \nOnce users access the web site through the use of the QR Code, they can then browse information on the artworks, browse other users submissions and submit their own impressions.\n \nQR Codes being a ubiquitous protocol in Japan \nFor the technical minded in the group:\n The system design employed i-mode compatible HTML Version 1.0 which is the standard supported by most mobile phones in Japan. (46.8 million customers in Japan and over 5 million in the rest of the world)\n However, with the rise of iPhones, smartphones and other web-enabled small devices a redesign will need to de done. Much more freedom in design \n
  • Users access information of artworks with their mobile phones through a QR Code located near the artwork.\n \nOnce users access the web site through the use of the QR Code, they can then browse information on the artworks, browse other users submissions and submit their own impressions.\n \nQR Codes being a ubiquitous protocol in Japan \nFor the technical minded in the group:\n The system design employed i-mode compatible HTML Version 1.0 which is the standard supported by most mobile phones in Japan. (46.8 million customers in Japan and over 5 million in the rest of the world)\n However, with the rise of iPhones, smartphones and other web-enabled small devices a redesign will need to de done. Much more freedom in design \n
  • The city was Hiroshima, located in western Japan, has many works of public art around the theme of peace.\n \nIn Japan, it seems that the appreciation of art is restricted to the elite, and the majority of people do not seem interested enough to visit art museums. \n\n\n
  • Six pieces of public art throughout Hiroshima City were assigned for their proximity to one another and the relative ease by which visitors could view them in a half day walk around the city. \n\nAn experiment to evaluate the system was conducted over three separate days in December of last year and early this year.\n\nThe experiment also consisted of artworks that users spontaneously added to the system (identified as Discovered Artworks in the results analysis). \n\n
  • The success of the system and its design assessed through these three methods.\n\nQuestionnaires\nOver the course of the three experiments there were 60 respondents to the questionnaires. And there is a detailed graphic analysis in the paper. They did show an high overall satisfaction with the experience of using the system. \n\n
  • The group interview consisted of 11 people and it was conducted to gain more detailed feedback than the questionnaire allowed for.\n\nThe responses gathered followed these four themes. \n\nYou can see from these comments that they found the experience quite enjoyable. And that they benefited from the social and inclusive aspects of the system.\nThe comments also revealed that there is still some work to do on the interface to make it more user friendly. \n\n
  • The group interview consisted of 11 people and it was conducted to gain more detailed feedback than the questionnaire allowed for.\n\nThe responses gathered followed these four themes. \n\nYou can see from these comments that they found the experience quite enjoyable. And that they benefited from the social and inclusive aspects of the system.\nThe comments also revealed that there is still some work to do on the interface to make it more user friendly. \n
  • There were 157 contributions over the course of the three experiments.\n\nThere were a high rate of positive expressions and that people really took to the opportunity to share artworks and their thoughts about them. \nThere were also very imaginative in using original titles for artworks.\n\nHowever, we did also find many contributions that were blank or did not provided titles. This suggests that we have some work to do on the usability.\n\n
  • From these results, you can see that there was an affect on enabling active appreciation, especially through the adding of their own discovered art pieces. \n\nAnd with the development of handheld devices that have much more capabilities we aim to realize a support system that is stress-free and makes art appreciation an active, social experience.\n\n
  • Transcript

    • 1. Design
of
an
Apprecia/on
Support
System
for
Public
Art
Using
Mobile
Phones■ Kiyoka
Fushimi

Hiroshima
Kokusai
Gakuin
University,
Japan
■ Karin
Barac








Griffith
University,
Australia Hirokazu
Yoshimura

:Hosei
University,
Japan Hiromi
Sekiguchi

:
Oita
Prefectural
College
of
Arts
and
College,
Japan Hiroyuki
Une

:
Hiroshima
Kokusai
Gakuin
University,
Japan

 Takahiro
Anasako
:
Hiroshima
Kokusai
Gakuin
University,
Japan




    • 2. 2/10

Evolu/on
of
the
Study ■
2003: Using
PDA
mobile
devices ■
Test:
Nagoya
City
Art
Museum ■
2005: Using
mobile
phones
loaned
to
viewer ■
Test:
Toyota
Municipal
Museum
of
Art ■
2006: Using

mobile
phones
owned
by
viewers
 ■
Test:
Hiroshima
City
Museum
of
Contemporary
Art ■
2007:
 Using

mobile
phones
owned
by
viewers,
loca/on
undefined ■
Test:
Hiroshima
City
    • 3. 3/10

Characteris/cs
of
the
System 7581"()&%") (%5+#$)/9) &",&)54) #25$"() !"#$%&"() *("+) ",-"+#".") &%+/*$%) #0/10"2"&) 34*."()5) -/(#60") 5--+".#56/) 52/$)&%") *("+() :11/;()9/+) 5.."((#8#1#&<))
    • 4. 4/10

Implementa/on
of
our
System ■
QR Quick
Response Code ■ Login
page
    • 5. 4/10

Implementa/on
of
our
System ■
QR Quick
Response Code ■ Login
page■ Art
work
information
page ■ Retrieval
page ■ Contribution
page ■ category ■ details
 ■ navigation

    • 6. 5/10

Public
Art
Loca/on
City ■Childrens
Peace
Monument ■Arch
 □
Completed:
1954 □
Completed:
1958 □Sculptor
 Kazuo
Kikuchi □Sculptor
 
Henry
Spencer
Moore
    • 7. 6/10

Chosen
pieces
 ■Peace
Bridge ■Memorial
Monument
for
Hiroshima,
 ■Memorial
Cathedral
for
 □
Completed:
1952 City
of
Peace World
Peace □
Sculptor Isamu
NOGUCH □
Completed:
1952 □
Completed:
1954 □
Architect Kenzo
TANGE □
Architect Togo
MURANO ■Old
Branch
Office
of
 ■West
Fire
Station ■MITISHIRUBE:
Guidepost Nippon
Ginko
Hiroshima □
Completed:
200 □Completed:
1995 □
Completed:
1920
 □Architect Riken
YAMAMOTO
 □Sculptor
 Kyubee
KIYOMIZU □
Architect Uheiji
NAGANO

    • 8. 7/10

Gauging
Success 0&-*)1"%&$+-&+ !"#$%&()*#$+ ,-#*.)#/$+ -2#+$3$-#4+
    • 9. 8/10

Group
Interview
Results

□
Contribu/ng
to
Prepared
Artworks 


versus
Discovered
Artworks□Advantages
and
Disadvantages
of
 

outdoor
viewing□Advantages
of
sharing
experiences
 

with
many
people□Problems
with
the
design
    • 10. 8/10

Group
Interview
Results

 :,#+&$#7(;265,#,-#□
Contribu/ng
to
Prepared
Artworks :,#+&$#.&$(.#,-#+(,.#9-# 6)7.$,&)7#-,%.#1.-15.<$# 


versus
Discovered
Artworks ,%.#+->$#:#7($2-B..7# 2-33.),$#+%.)#-).#%&$# ,%&)#,%.#-).$#()#,%.#$,67"!! 5(=5.#>)-+5.7*.#-9#&,# C,#B(.+()*#()#-6,7--# ???(31.$$(-)$#2&)#8.# &@.2,.7#8"#A3.#-9#7&"#&)7#□Advantages
and
Disadvantages
of
 $1&2.$#($#3-.#2&.9..#&$# +.&,%.#$-#.&7()*#-,%.# "-6#2&)#,&>.#&#8.&>#()#&# 

outdoor
viewing 2-),(86A-)$#9-3#,%.$.# 2-@..#$%-1#(9#"-6#8.2-3.# 7(@..),#$(,6&A-)$#&77.7# A.7# B&56.#,-#3"#.01.(.)2.# !"#$%&()*#+(,%#-,%.$/# 4%.#%63&)#&$1.2,#-9#□Advantages
of
sharing
experiences
 ,%.#.01.(.)2.#%&$#3-.# 2-),(86A-)$#3&>.$#,%.# 

with
many
people 3.&)()*# .01.(.)2.#3-.#.&5# 4%.#$.&2%#5($,#+-657#8.# :,#+&$#%&7#,-#&=&2%#&# .&$(.#(9#(,#7($15&".7# 5&8.5#,-#&)#(3&*.#,%&,#:#□Problems
with
the
design (3&*.$#&,%.#,%&)#,.0,# &77.7#,-#$%&.#+(,%#-,%.$#
    • 11. 9/10

Contribu/ons
to
the
System 
■157
contribu/ons
over
the
course
    • 12. 10/10


Concluding
Thoughts □Ac/ve
apprecia/on
can
be
encouraged
through
the
experience
of
adding

 artworks
especially
with
public
art ■We
have
to
extend
our
system
to
allow
access
from
these
smartphones 

to
achieve
a
wider
user
base
for
our
system.
 ■We
aim
to
realize
a
support
system
that
is
stress‐free 

and
makes
art
apprecia/on
an
ac/ve,
social
experience. ■Please
try hcp://seiryu.id.hkg.ac.jp/pa/ Password
:
hiroshima ■Thank
you.


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