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Fmea presentation

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  • 1. Failure Mode and Effects Analysis based on FMEA 4th Edition Mark A. Morris ASQ Automotive Division Webinar November 30, 2011 mark@MandMconsulting.com www.MandMconsulting.com
  • 2. Purpose of this Course• Enable participants to understand the importance of FMEA in achieving robust capable designs and processes.• Teach participants how to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their FMEA efforts.• Get the right people involved in the process of FMEA, and get results.• Have Fun Learning!!!
  • 3. Learning ObjectivesParticipants will be able to: Explain the purpose, benefits and objectives of FMEA. Select cross-functional teams to develop FMEAs. Develop and complete a FMEA. Review, critique, and update existing FMEAs. Manage FMEA follow-up and verification activities. Develop FMEAs in alignment with AIAG FMEA reference manuals.
  • 4. Changes in the FMEA Manual (4th Ed.)• Improved format, easier to read.• Better examples to improve utility.• Reinforces need for management support.• Strengthens linkage between DFMEA/PFMEA.• Ranking tables better reflect real world use.• Introduces alternative methods in use.• Suggests better means than RPN to assess risk.• Recommends against threshold RPN values to initiate required action.
  • 5. Process FMEA Report POTENTIAL FMEA Number ___________ FAILURE MODE AND EFFECTS ANALYSIS (Process FMEA) Page _____ of ______ Item _________________________________ Process Responsibility ______________________ Prepared by _________________________ Model Year(s) Program(s) ________________ Key Date _________________________________ FMEA Date (Orig.) _______ (Rev.) _______ Core Team _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ C Action ResultsProcess Potential O Step Potential Potential S l Current Current D R. Failure Effects of e a Causes/ c Process Process e P. Recommended Responsibility R. Mechanisms & Target Actions S O D Mode Failure v s of Failure c Control Control t N. Actions Completion Date Taken e c e P. s (Prevention) (Detection) N. Function v c t
  • 6. Process FMEA Analysis Process C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) s This column is usedProcess Step Describe how the Identify potential to document methods is simply item could causes of the item that have been used tothe focus of potentially fail to not performing its detect either the cause the analysis perform its function intended function or the failure mode State the effects of the failure in Describe terms of the specific This column is reserved the function or system, subsystem, for the methods that requirement to or component have been used to be analyzed being analyzed prevent a specific cause
  • 7. Process FMEA AnalysisProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) s Occurrence Detection Severity rates how often ranks our ability evaluates a specific cause is to detect either a the impact likely to result in cause or a resulting of the effect. the failure mode failure mode. Use being analyzed. best detection available. Classification is an optional Risk Priority Number column commonly used is the product of to identify safety risks. the severity, occurrence, and detection rankings.
  • 8. Four Common Classes of FMEA• System FMEA – Focuses on how interactions among systems might fail.• Design FMEA – Focuses on how product design might fail.• Process FMEA – Focuses on how processes that make the product might fail.• Machinery FMEA – Focuses on how machinery that perform processes might fail.The focus for this evening is on Process FMEA.
  • 9. AIAG Model for Quality Planning Design FMEA Process & Machinery FMEA
  • 10. Understanding a Failure Sequence Cause Failure Mode Detection Detection Direct Failure Immediate Cause Mode Effect
  • 11. Is it a Cause or Failure Mode? System Level Failure Modes Effects Causes Subsystem Level Failure Modes Effects Causes Component Level Failure Modes Effects Causes
  • 12. Examples of Weld Process Failure Modes • System (Welding Line) – Robot Failure – Loss of Incoming Water – No Signal to Weld • Subsystem (Weld Gun) – Cracked Jaw – Failed Servo Motor – Failed Shunt • Component (Servo Motor) – Overheats – Loss of Position – Premature Seal Failure 12
  • 13. A Rational Structure for Quality Planning TM Product Product Design FMEA Design FMEA Process Process Process FMEA Process FMEA CustomerPlant Customer Plant Tool Design Tool Design Control Plan Control Plan MachineryFMEA Machinery FMEA Internal Processes Internal Processes Process FMEA Process FMEA Internal Process Internal Process Control Plan Control Plan
  • 14. Motivation for Specific FMEAs Product Customer Life Design FMEA Cycle Satisfaction Cost Process Process FMEA R&M Customer Plant Tool Design Control Plan Machinery FMEA Internal Processes Process FMEA First-Time Capability Internal Process Control Plan
  • 15. DFMEA Information Linkages
  • 16. The Underlying Message• Don’t correct a weak product design by focusing on a super robust process.• Don’t correct a weak process design by focusing on design changes to the product.
  • 17. PFMEA Information Linkages
  • 18. Rational Structure andProject Specific Control Plans Identify and Manage Product Information Design FMEA Required for Contract Review Process Process FMEA Identify and Manage Deliverables Customer Plant Required for Tool Design Design Review Control Plan Machinery FMEA Internal Processes Identify and Manage Process FMEA Deliverables Required for Internal Process Build & Buy-Off Control Plan
  • 19. Three Phases of Control Plan Phase 1 Product Control Plan Design FMEA for Phase 2 Prototype Process Control Plan Process FMEA for Pre-Production Customer Plant Tool Design Control Plan Machinery FMEA Phase 3 Internal Processes Control Plan Process FMEA for Production Internal Process Control Plan
  • 20. Containment Considerations • Cost of Defects • Risk of Defects • Bracketing Strategies • Protecting On-Time Delivery • Cost of Stopping Production • Cost of Recall Campaigns • Benefits of Traceability
  • 21. FMEA Teams• Multi-functional teams are essential.• Ensure expertise from manufacturing engineering, plant operations, maintenance, and other appropriate sources.• Select team with ability to contribute: – Knowledge – Information – Experience – Equity – Empowerment• Pick the right team members, but limit the number of team members based on the scope of the issues being addressed.• In addition to the FMEA team. – Call in Experts as Needed
  • 22. Relevant Resources and Expertise
  • 23. Common Team Problems• No Common Understanding of FMEA• Overbearing Participants• Reluctant Participants• Opinions Treated as Facts• Rush to Accomplishments• Digression and Tangents• Hidden Agendas• Going through the Motions• Seeing FMEA as a Deliverable
  • 24. A Process Flow for FMEA
  • 25. 1. Define the Scope• Scope is essential because it sets limits on a given FMEA, that is, it makes it finite.• Several documents may assist the team in determining the scope of a Process FMEA: – Process Flow Diagram – Relationship Matrix – Drawings, Sketches, or Schematics – Bill of Materials (BOM)
  • 26. Process Flow Charts High Level Flow Chart Detailed Flow Chart
  • 27. 2. Define the Customer• Four major customers need to be considered: – End Users – OEM Plants – Supplier Plants – Government Agencies (safety and environment)• Customer knowledge can contribute precise definition of functions, requirements, and specifications.
  • 28. 3. Identify Functions, Requirements, Specifications• Identify and understand the process steps and their functions, requirements, and specifications that are within the scope of the analysis.• The goal in this phase is to clarify the design intent or purpose of the process.• This step, well done, leads quite naturally to the identification of potential failure modes.
  • 29. Defining Functions• Describe the Functions in Concise Terms• Use “Verb-Noun” Phrases• Select Active Verbs• Use Terms that can be Measured• Examples: – Pick and Place Unit Secure Part Advance Part Locate Part – Robot Position Weld Gun
  • 30. Process Steps, Functions, RequirementsProcess Steps Functions Requirements
  • 31. Process and Functional Requirements
  • 32. Identify Process and Function – Traditional FormatProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) sClearance holefor 12 mm bolt - Hole size - Hole location - Free of burrs
  • 33. Identification of Failure Modes Omission Functional Incorrect of an Action Requirements Actions Function Function Not Done Done Poorly Correct Actions Surprise Results
  • 34. Example: Failure ModesColor Change System Failure Modes Spray Paint No Paint Spitting Paint Function Stream of Paint Dispense Paint Properly Too Much Paint Too Little Paint Void in Fan
  • 35. Example: Failure ModesColor Change System Failure Modes Measure Fluid Flow No Feedback Signal Intermittent Signal Function Signal Too High Send Accurate Feedback Signal Signal Too Low Feedback Signal with No Flow Flow Meter Restricts Flow
  • 36. Example of Failure Modes
  • 37. Example of Failure Modes
  • 38. Identify Process and Function – Traditional FormatProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) sClearance hole No holefor 12 mm bolt - Hole size Hole too large Hole too small Hole violates MMC boundary- Hole Depth Hole not drilled thru- Hole location - No burrs
  • 39. Failure Mode Identification WorksheetProcess Step: Potential Failure Modes Functional requirements or specifications:
  • 40. 5. Identify Potential Causes• Potential cause of failure describes how a process failure could occur, in terms of something that can be controlled or corrected.• Our goal is to describe the direct relationship that exists between the cause and resulting process failure mode.• Document a unique failure sequence with each potential cause.
  • 41. Causes Causes Precede the Failure Mode Direct Cause Direct Failure Immediate Cause Mode Effect Direct Cause
  • 42. FMEA Worksheet Form
  • 43. Transfer of Failure Mode to Worksheet
  • 44. Example of Causes
  • 45. Example of Causes
  • 46. Identify Causes of Failure – Traditional FormatProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) sClearance hole Hole too Feed rate toofor 12 mm bolt large high - Hole size Spindle speed too slow Wrong drill size Drill improperly sharpened Wrong tool geometry for material- Hole depth Hole not Missing drill drilled thru
  • 47. 6. Identify Potential Effects• Potential effects of a process failure are defined as the result of the failure mode as perceived by the customer.• The intent is to describe the impact of the failure in terms of what the customer might notice or experience.• This applies to both internal and external customers.
  • 48. Causes and Effects Effects are the Result of the Failure Mode Causes Precede the Immediate Failure Mode Effect Direct Failure Immediate Cause Mode Effect Immediate Effect
  • 49. Two Focal Points for EffectsAn effect is the immediate consequence of the failure mode.• What is the pain that is felt by the end user?• What is the pain felt by downstream manufacturing or assembly operations?
  • 50. Example of Effects
  • 51. Example of Effects
  • 52. Identify Effects of Failure – Traditional FormatProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) s Feed rate too Clearance hole Hole too Bolt may not high for 12 mm bolt large hold torque - Hole size Spindle speed Violation of too slow specification Wrong drill size Drill improperly sharpened Wrong tool geometry for material - Hole depth Hole not Assemble with Missing drill drilled thru missing fastener
  • 53. 7. Identify Current Controls• Current Process Controls describe planned activities or devices that can prevent or detect the cause of a failure or a failure mode itself.• There are two classes of controls: – Preventive controls either eliminate the causes of the failure mode or the failure mode itself, or reduce how frequently it occurs. – Detective controls recognize a failure mode or a cause of failure so associated countermeasures are put into action.• Preventive controls are the preferred approach because they are most cost effective.
  • 54. Two Types of Detection Cause Failure Mode Detection Detection • Go/NoGo Gage • Set-Up Validation Sign-Off Direct Failure Immediate Cause Mode Effects Wrong Nozzle in Bin Wrong Paint Nozzle Paint Splatter Too Much Paint Too Little Paint
  • 55. Example of Process Controls
  • 56. Example of Process Controls
  • 57. Identify Current Controls – Traditional FormatProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) s Clearance hole Hole too Bolt may not Feed rate too DOE Results Set Up for 12 mm bolt large hold torque high Verification - Hole size Violation of Spindle speed DOE Results Set Up specification too slow Verification Wrong drill First Piece size Inspection Dull drill bit Load Meter Drill improperly Set Up sharpened Verification Wrong tool DOE Results Set Up geometry for verification material
  • 58. 8. Identify and Prioritize Risk• Risk in a Process FMEA is identified in three ways: Severity – which measures the effect. Occurrence – to assess the frequency of causes. Detection – ability to detect causes or failures.• It is appropriate to assess these three scores through the understanding of your customer’s requirements.
  • 59. Severity of Effect
  • 60. Frequency of Occurrence
  • 61. Detection by Current Control
  • 62. Assess Severity, Occurrence, DetectionProcess C Current Potential Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Process Causes/ Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c (Detection) Function of Failure (Prevention) s Occurrence Detection Severity rates how often ranks our ability evaluates a specific cause is to detect either a the impact likely to result in cause or a resulting of the effect. the failure mode failure mode. Use being analyzed. best detection available.
  • 63. Example of Severity, Occurrence, Detection
  • 64. Example of Severity, Occurrence, Detection
  • 65. Prioritization of RiskSeveral strategies exist for the mitigation of risk, for example:1. High Risk Priority Numbers2. High Severity Risks (regardless of RPN)3. High Design Risks (Severity x Occurrence)4. Other Alternatives (S,O,D) and (S,D)NOTE: “The use of an RPN threshold is NOT a recommended practice for the need for action.”
  • 66. Identify Current Controls – Traditional FormatProcess C Potential Current Current D R. Step Potential Potential S l O Causes/ Process Process e P. Failure Effects of a e Mechanisms c Control Control t N. Mode Failure v s c Function of Failure (Prevention) (Detection) sClearance hole Hole too Bolt may not 5 Feed rate too 2 DOE Results Set Up 5 50for 12 mm bolt large hold torque high Verification- Hole size Violation of Spindle speed 2 DOE Results Set Up 5 50 specification too slow Verification Wrong drill 2 First Piece 5 50 size Inspection Dull drill bit 4 Load Meter 2 40 Drill improperly 2 Set Up 5 50 sharpened Verification Wrong tool 2 DOE Results Set Up 5 50 geometry for verification material
  • 67. 9. Recommend Actions• The intent with recommended actions is to reduce risk.• Recommended actions will be focused to: – Reduce Severity – Reduce Frequency of Occurrence – Improve Detection
  • 68. Managing Recommended Actions• Transfer FMEA action items onto the mechanism used to track and ensure closure of open issues on the project.• Decisions to take different actions or not to act must be approved.• Review status of FMEA action items on a regular basis.
  • 69. Recommended Actions Action Results Responsibility Recommended Actions S O D R. & Target Actions Taken e c e P. Completion Date v c t N.
  • 70. 10. Verify Results• Whenever you change a process one of two things happen: – Things Get Better – Things Get Worse• Verify actual performance following the implementation of the recommended actions.
  • 71. Summary and Closure
  • 72. Key Points to RememberUpon successful completion of this course, you should know:1. Potential FMEA Reference Manual is the authoritative reference.2. Severity scores of 9 or 10 must be used for safety related risks.3. Occurrence ranks how often each cause is likely to result in failure.4. It is appropriate to focus on high severity items first.5. Credit for preventive actions shows up in the frequency of occurrence.6. Risk Priority Numbers provides a rank order to risks and action items.7. An effective approach is to continually focus on the top five concerns.8. Process FMEA should result in tangible improvement to process performance.
  • 73. Questions and Answers Please type yourquestions in the panel box
  • 74. Thank You For AttendingPlease visit our websitewww.asq-auto.org for future webinar datesand topics.

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