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Leone Walsh - Project 3 - Slidecast Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Technology supporting, changing, catalyzing Education.
    Memorial University of Newfoundland
    Business 6620 Issues and Trends – Educational Computing
    Leone Walsh
  • 2. U.S. Congress – Future Visions of Technology 1
    “Technology serves a dual role within education. First, it can be used to support lifelong teaching and learning that is “authentic,” and, second, it can catalyze the institutional changes necessary to usher in authentic teaching and learning.” (p. 81.)
  • 3. Will Technology Change ?
    Absolutely.
    14 Scott (2004) and 4 Buchanan (2003) indicate that research has confirmed one thing:
    Technology has improved and changed direction, and will continue to change significantly and probably more quickly than it ever has before.
  • 4. Should Education Necessarily Change ?
    1 U.S. Congress – Future Visions of Technology confirms technology has changed and will continue to change, at an increasing pace.
    However, should Education change just because technology changes ?
    2 Vail (2003) warns “If you start with technology, it’s a solution looking for a problem.” (Para. 2, p. 35.)
  • 5. U.S. Department of Education and Department of Commerce (2004) study 3
    Students of today – very technologically aware.
    Not just technology, but digital technology.
    3 Students “integrate digital technologies—such as computers, the Internet, instant messaging, cell phones, and e-mail—seamlessly throughout their daily activities.”
    3 “Time spent using digital media by children aged 13-17 has now surpassed the time they spend watching television” (p. 7.)
  • 6. Computers and Internet
    4 Buchanan (2003) – Increased access to computers and the internet.
    5 Hardin and Zeibarth (2000) states “computers will be available for all students, access to the internet will be widely available”
    6 The New Consortium (2008) Horizon report confirms both contentions.
    7 Kim et al (2006)
    Wireless broadband access at home and at school
    Confirmed by 8 Mason et al (2005), 9 Tuomi (2007),
    10 Joyner (2003), 2 Vail (2003) and 4 Buchanan (2003).
  • 7. Individual Laptops / Access
    11 Tinker (2000) concludes:
    widespread acceptance and use of one to one computers, be they handhelds, laptops, or some future computing device.
    increased Broadband access.
    10 Joyner (2003) and 12 Mason & Dodds (2005) both confirmed these conclusions.
  • 8. Semantic / Knowledge Web Technologies
    13 Dede (2000), 14 Scott (2004), 15 Carneiro(2007) all contend:
    Semantic web technologies - significantly better search capabilities for information and knowledge gathering
    Knowledge web technology - students using those new capabilities will have authenticated knowledge at their fingertips.
  • 9. Audio and Visual Technology
    14 Scott (2004)
    current classroom usage of audio and video technology will significantly expand
    teachers and students alike will make significant use of audio and video streaming capabilities
    6 New Media Consortiums 2008 Horizon Report, 7 Kim et al (2006), 16 Bhattacharya (2008) and 9 Tuomi (2007) agree.
  • 10. Online Testing and Blended Learning
    7 Kim et al (2006) states future teachers and students will see:
    Significant increased use of online testing and exam tools,
    11 Tinker (2000) and 2 Vail (2003) confirm this.
    7 Kim et al (2006) also suggests that most courses:
    deliver course content in a blended learning approach,
    moving towards more online content and less in person content.
  • 11. Other Technologies
    13 Dede (2000) reports:
    foresee significant increase of the use of virtual collaborative group technologies.
    5 Hardin et al (2000) and 17 Engelbrecht et al (2005) confirm this.
    9 Tuomi (2007) indicates
    Use significantly more games based education.
    Confirmed by 3 U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Commerce. (2004) study and 20 Davidson et al (2009).
    Foresees use of blogs, wikis, podcasts, social networks, and virtual worlds
    18 Harris (2009) confirms this.
  • 12. Other Technologies
    3 U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Commerce (2004) suggests:
    that digital storage capabilities will significantly grow, and
    11 Tinker (2000) contents
    books may actually disappear, and
    cost savings being moved to required network resources.
  • 13. What do Students Expect?
    3 U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Commerce (2004) indicate students want:
    Personal portable laptop or handheld,
    Full voice control capabilities and full internet capability,
    Capabilities of a CD player and DVD player,
    Other miscellaneous capabilities:
    calculator, digital camera,
    text and instant messaging,
    web address book,
    music player, cell phone, MP3 player,
    TV, iPod, CD/DVD burner,
    USB port, printer,
    dictionary, thesaurus, atlas,
    Watch, tape recorder
    Games, study guides,
    and, Intelligent Tutors / Homework Helpers.
  • 14. Projected Future for Schools, Colleges and Universities
    Besides what was already mentioned
    One to one laptop use,
    full wireless broadband access,
    Semantic and Knowledge Web capabilities
    Books online,
    Use of audio and video.
    23 Kearney et al (2000) contends
    More adult students in Colleges and Universities –
    Agreed to by 20 Davidson (2009), 15Carneiro (2007) , 21 Reese (2009) and 22 Yankelovich (2006)
  • 15. Projected Future for Schools, Colleges and Universities - continued
    Digital storage capability will significantly increase
    Text and Instant Messaging
    Significant Blended Learning
    Undergraduate courses often offered via online
    12 Mason et al (2005) contends –
    Much more work related Online Certifications / Recertifications
    Confirmed by 27 Pappas et al (2004)
  • 16. Projected Future for Schools, Colleges and Universities - continued
    24Hashim (2005) contends no time limit, any time, anywhere education.
    26 Lefrere (2007) contends global education delivery and confirmed by 9 Tuomi (2007), and 22 Yankelovich (2006).
    24Hashim (2005) explains that part time teachers - more prevalent
    7 Kim et al (2006) contends - more women teachers of online courses.
    23 Kearney et al (2000) contends
    Increased training and support for online teachers.
    Confirmed 11 Tinker (2000) and 7 Kim et al (2006)
  • 17. Roles will change
    Educational approaches
    change significantly, and
    teachers, administrators, and schools need to adapt.
    1 U.S. Congress – Future Visions of Technology indicates that :
    Roles of teachers,
    Roles of students,
    Roles of school staff, and
    the community itself will change significantly.
  • 18. My Personal Projections - Teachers
    Struggle with usage of individual tools versus tool categories.
    Newer Teacher and Older Teacher divide:
    Newer teachers
    University trained in those technologies
    Grown up with those technologies
    Older teachers will struggle to keep up.
    Content will become more online:
    Teachers
    work harder to prepare content
    book sellers and course material preparers provide online content.
  • 19. My Personal Projections - Students
    Access:
    Online content,
    Anytime,
    Anywhere.
    Interaction with Teachers:
    Based on success.
    Successful students mostly just check-in.
    Class work submission - electronic.
    Underachieving students - “face to face” time, like a tutor.
  • 20. My Personal Projections - Administrators
    Confirm service delivery:
    How to ensure teachers are effectively delivering content
    Are children “attending” school.
    Less brick and mortar facilities.
    Training, content and communication costs will increase.
  • 21. My Personal Projections - Parents
    Is my child being educated ?
    Who to talk to ?
    Is this an education ?
    How can I help ?
  • 22. Future of Education
    Education will:
    Be delivered differently, but
    education will continue.
  • 23. References
    16 Bhattacharya, B. (2008, May 1). Engineering Education in India--The Role of ICT. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 45(2), 93-101. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ789813) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    4 Buchanan, B. (2003, September 1). The Broadband Buzz. American School Board Journal, 190(9), 38-40. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ672940) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    15 Carneiro, R. (2007, June 1). The Big Picture: Understanding Learning and Meta-Learning Challenges. European Journal of Education, 42(2), 151-172. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ764855) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    20 Davidson, P. & Goldberg, D. (2009) The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age, The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation reports on digital media and learning, London, England.
     
    17 Engelbrecht, J., & Harding, A. (2005, February 1). Teaching Undergraduate Mathematics on the Internet: PART 1: Technologies and Taxonomy. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 58(2), 235-252. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ732535) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
  • 24. References (continued)
    5 Hardin, J. & Ziebarth, J. (2000). Digital Technology and its Impact on Education. http://www.ed.gov/Technology/Futures/hardin.html, Retrieved August 08, 2009.
     
    18 Harris, A., & Rea, A. (2009, January 1). Web 2.0 and Virtual World Technologies: A Growing Impact on IS Education. Journal of Information Systems Education, 20(2), 137-144. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ844215) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    24 Hashim, H. (2005). A. Computers: Educational Technology Paradox? http://www.tojet.net/articles/438.htm, retrieved August 08, 2009.
     
    10 Joyner, A. (2003, September 1). A Foothold for Handhelds. American School Board Journal, 190(9), 42-44. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ672941) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    7 Kim, K., & Bonk, C. (2006, January 1). The Future of Online Teaching and Learning in Higher Education: The Survey Says... EDUCAUSE Quarterly, 29(4), 22-30. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ839337) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
  • 25. References (continued)
    23 Kearney, B. & Isakson, J. (2000) January 1). Future Considerations. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ760370) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    26 Lefrere, P. (2007, June 1). Competing Higher Education Futures in a Globalising World. European Journal of Education, 42(2), 201-212. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ764847) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    12 Mason, C., & Dodds, R. (2005, May 1). Bridge the Digital Divide for Educational Equity. Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 70(9), 25-27. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ741330) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    6 New Media Consortium. (2008). 2008 Horizon Report, http://www.nmc.org/pdf/2008-Horizon-Report.pdf, Retrieved August 08, 2009.
    27 Pappas, J., & Jerman, J. (2004, January 1). Future Considerations. New Directions for Adult and Continuing Education, (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ760370) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
    21 Reese, S. (2009, May 1). Gazing into the Future. Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers, 84(5), 14-19. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ840444) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
  • 26. References (continued)
    14 Scott, P. (2004) Will Technology Enhanced Learning ever deliver 'genuine' innovation?, K2 Summit: Knowledge sharing and looking at the future, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
    Stutt, A., & Motta, E. (2004) Will Technology Enhanced Learning ever deliver 'genuine' innovation?, K2 Summit: Knowledge sharing and looking at the future, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
    11 Tinker, B. (2000). The Whole World in Their Hands. http://www.ed.gov/Technology/Futures/tinker.html, Retrieved August 08, 2009.
     
    9 Tuomi, I. (2007, June 1). Learning in the Age of Networked Intelligence. European Journal of Education, 42(2), 235-254. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ764850) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
     
    1U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment, Education and Technology: Future Visions, OTA-BP-EHR-169 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, September 1995).
  • 27. References (continued)
    3 U.S. Department of Education & U.S. Department of Commerce. (2004). Visions 2020.2 Student Views on Transforming Education and Training
     
    2 Vail, K. (2003, September 1). School Technology Grows Up. American School Board Journal, 190(9), 34-37. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ672939) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
    22 Yankelovich, D. (2006, January 1). Higher Education in 2015. Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 71(5), 43-53. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ740994) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.
    19 Williams, P. (2007, October 1). Valid Knowledge: The Economy and the Academy. Higher Education: The International Journal of Higher Education and Educational Planning, 54(4), 511-523. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. EJ774729) Retrieved August 4, 2009, from ERIC database.