Paragraph writing

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supplementary material for Academic Writing for the Master in TEFL / FUNIBER

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Paragraph writing

  1. 1. Paragraph Writing Compiled by M.Ed. Maria Luisa Mu, 2012-2013
  2. 2. What is a paragraph? O A paragraph is a group of sentences about a single topic. O The sentences of the paragraph explain the writer’s main idea about the topic. O In academic writing, a paragraph is often between five and ten sentences long. Taken from Academic Writing from paragraph to essay by D. Zemach & L. Rumisek, Macmillan, UK. 2009
  3. 3. Paragraph organisation O The topic sentence: The main idea of the paragraph. O The supporting sentences: They explain the topic sentence. O The concluding sentences: The last sentence of the paragraph Taken from Academic Writing from paragraph to essay by D. Zemach & L. Rumisek, Macmillan, UK. 2009
  4. 4. The topic sentence O It is the most important sentence in a paragraph. O It indicates what the paragraph is going to discuss. O It is a complete sentence. O It contains both a topic and a controlling idea. O It is the most general statement in the paragraph. Taken from Writing Academic English by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue, Pearson Educ. 2006
  5. 5. Topic sentences Taken from Writing Academic English by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue, Pearson Educ. 2006
  6. 6. Supporting sentences O After you have chosen a topic and written a topic sentence, you develop your main idea by adding more information to explain what you mean. O Three common ways of doing this is: O Giving details O Giving an explanation O Giving an example Taken from Academic Writing from paragraph to essay by D. Zemach & L. Rumisek, Macmillan, UK. 2009
  7. 7. Supporting sentences Taken from Writing Academic English by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue, Pearson Educ. 2006
  8. 8. Example of supporting Sentences Taken from Writing Academic English by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue, Pearson Educ. 2006 Example Quotations Statistics
  9. 9. The Concluding Sentence O It is the final sentence of a paragraph. O It sums up the main points or restates the main idea in a different way. O It reminds the reader of what the writer’s main idea and supporting points were. O It should give the same information in a slightly different way. O It should not introduce a new point. Taken from Academic Writing from paragraph to essay by D. Zemach & L. Rumisek, Macmillan, UK. 2009
  10. 10. The Concluding Sentence O A concluding sentence serves two purposes: O It signals the end of the paragraph. O It leaves the reader with the most important ideas to remember by summarizing the main points of the paragraph or by repeating the topic sentences in different ways.
  11. 11. End of Paragraph Signals Taken from Writing Academic English by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue, Pearson Educ.
  12. 12. Concluding Sentences: Another example Taken from Writing Academic English by Alice Oshima and Ann Hogue, Pearson Educ. 2006
  13. 13. Peer Editing O There are two reasons for peer-editing: O To get a reader´s opinion about your writing (whether you should add more details, something is not organised clearly, you have some information that is not relevant). O To read more examples of writing.
  14. 14. How to peer-edit O Read the work several times. The first time from the beginning to an end, the second time more slowly and look for specific parts of the writing. O Look for topic sentences and concluding sentences. O Note places where it is difficult to understand and where there is unnecessary information. O Pay attention just to the content and organisation of the work.

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