Multidisciplinary Research Week                        (17-22nd March 2013)         ‘Ethical Fashion Futures – An Oxymoron...
Ethical Fashion Futures– An Oxymoron?Discussion from workshop 9th March 2013Multidisciplinary WeekEmma Waight & Ellie Tigh...
The UK’s ethical fashion industry wasestimated to be worth £175 million in2009 (Mintel, 2009)Growing faster than almost an...
5
Regulatory Frameworks and Institutional Responses:           Bangladesh Garment Industry                                  ...
Start of the Supply Chain• Its starts with the raw material – the fibre and fabric• Environmental concerns – resource cons...
Cotton• A ‘good’ natural fibre?• Pesticides & fertilisers• Huge water footprint• Soil erosion• Farmers living in poverty –...
Ethical Fabric Alternatives• Organic & Fairtrade cotton• Colour grown cotton• Hemp, nettle and flax• Bamboo• Milk• Soy    ...
Fashion & International Development • Cut & Stitch manufacture • Out-Sourcing Production into Developing Countries • Globa...
Fashion & International Development    Global Level     • Consumer demand for fast fashion and cheap       clothing     • ...
Fashion & International Development    Local Level:    •Industrial relations systems between workers and    managers not d...
Fashion & International Development                                      13
Fashion & International Development Codes of Conduct – “Ethical” Clothing across the Scales: Voices from South Asia •Field...
Fashion & International Development  New Strategies: Impact, UK  •UK ethical retail consultancy, based London, China,  Ind...
Law & the role of the State• Ecological’, ‘sustainable,’ and ‘ethical’, are all terms now  frequently used in the fashion ...
Second-hand Fashion• Re-use = most sustainable way of  (not) shopping!• An ethical future? Consume less• Fewer clothes, be...
Conclusion - Ethical Fashion Futures – AnOxymoron?• Where consumers lead brands will follow• Fashion supply chains are com...
Conclusion - Ethical Fashion Futures –An Oxymoron?                                         19
Thank YouEllie TigheE.Tighe@soton.ac.uk@EllieTighehttp://thepursuitofgoodshoes.wordpress.com/Emma WaightE.J.Waight@soton.a...
Multidisciplinary Research Week              2013See the latest videos, interviews, pictures, tweets and viewsfrom the flo...
‘Ethical Fashion Futures – An Oxymoron?’, by Emma Waight & Ellie Tighe, Geography, University of Southampton. Multidiscipl...
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‘Ethical Fashion Futures – An Oxymoron?’, by Emma Waight & Ellie Tighe, Geography, University of Southampton. Multidisciplinary Research Week 2013. #MDRWeek.

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Multidisciplinary Research Week 2013 at the University of Southampton. #MDRWeek.
Ethical Fashion Futures – An Oxymoron?’, by Emma Waight & Ellie Tighe, Geography, University of Southampton.
See the latest videos, interviews, pictures, tweets and views from the floor at: www.southampton.ac.uk/multidisciplinary

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  • ‘Ethical Fashion Futures – An Oxymoron?’, by Emma Waight & Ellie Tighe, Geography, University of Southampton. Multidisciplinary Research Week 2013. #MDRWeek.

    1. 1. Multidisciplinary Research Week (17-22nd March 2013) ‘Ethical Fashion Futures – An Oxymoron?’,by Emma Waight & Ellie Tighe, Geography, University of Southampton.
    2. 2. Ethical Fashion Futures– An Oxymoron?Discussion from workshop 9th March 2013Multidisciplinary WeekEmma Waight & Ellie Tighe (Geography)21st March 2013
    3. 3. The UK’s ethical fashion industry wasestimated to be worth £175 million in2009 (Mintel, 2009)Growing faster than almost any otherethical sector, at 71% per year (Coop2008). 3
    4. 4. 5
    5. 5. Regulatory Frameworks and Institutional Responses: Bangladesh Garment Industry 6
    6. 6. Start of the Supply Chain• Its starts with the raw material – the fibre and fabric• Environmental concerns – resource consumption, GHG emissions, air & water pollution, soil degradation/contamination• Social concerns – worker’s rights, health & safety, poverty, animal welfare 7
    7. 7. Cotton• A ‘good’ natural fibre?• Pesticides & fertilisers• Huge water footprint• Soil erosion• Farmers living in poverty – suicides not uncommon• In the news: Loss of Aral Sea, Endosulfan – toxic pesticide caused death and deformities, Uzbekistan enforced child labour 8
    8. 8. Ethical Fabric Alternatives• Organic & Fairtrade cotton• Colour grown cotton• Hemp, nettle and flax• Bamboo• Milk• Soy Ethical fabric supplier: www.offsetwarehouse.com• Ingeo (corn) 9
    9. 9. Fashion & International Development • Cut & Stitch manufacture • Out-Sourcing Production into Developing Countries • Global Industry – 23.6 million employed worldwide • Clothing Production and Trade = Economic Growth and Job creation • Sweatshops and Labour rights abuses • Situation is complex having global, local and national institutional facets 10
    10. 10. Fashion & International Development Global Level • Consumer demand for fast fashion and cheap clothing • Short lead times and mass production • Bargaining buyers – suppliers on pricing • High level local competition 11
    11. 11. Fashion & International Development Local Level: •Industrial relations systems between workers and managers not developed •Poor regulation labour law •Low level education workers •“Global Competition” rhetoric •Government- Industry relations •Poor systems governance •Regulation dependent buyer pressures – codes of 12 conduct
    12. 12. Fashion & International Development 13
    13. 13. Fashion & International Development Codes of Conduct – “Ethical” Clothing across the Scales: Voices from South Asia •Fieldwork Pakistan and Sri Lanka •Codes of Conduct ineffective tool •Discrepancy between which codes are upheld 14
    14. 14. Fashion & International Development New Strategies: Impact, UK •UK ethical retail consultancy, based London, China, India and Bangladesh •Opportunities development and trade good •Business-led approach to improving worker conditions •Change attitudes on the ground 15
    15. 15. Law & the role of the State• Ecological’, ‘sustainable,’ and ‘ethical’, are all terms now frequently used in the fashion industry but with no clear legal definition• Lack of transparency• Consumer confusion• Country of origin labelling not compulsory• Should ethical clothing get tax breaks? www.ecofashionrules.com 16
    16. 16. Second-hand Fashion• Re-use = most sustainable way of (not) shopping!• An ethical future? Consume less• Fewer clothes, better quality, wear them for longer.• Is their a stigma attached to second-hand clothes? How has the ‘vintage’ trend helped?• Financial motivations 17
    17. 17. Conclusion - Ethical Fashion Futures – AnOxymoron?• Where consumers lead brands will follow• Fashion supply chains are complex, management needs collaborative effort• Demands change established conventions and practices• Supply chains need greater transparency• Training for future industry professionals• Consumers need educating 18
    18. 18. Conclusion - Ethical Fashion Futures –An Oxymoron? 19
    19. 19. Thank YouEllie TigheE.Tighe@soton.ac.uk@EllieTighehttp://thepursuitofgoodshoes.wordpress.com/Emma WaightE.J.Waight@soton.ac.uk@EmsWaightwww.emmawaight.co.ukwww.geographypostgrads.com 20
    20. 20. Multidisciplinary Research Week 2013See the latest videos, interviews, pictures, tweets and viewsfrom the floor at:Website: www.southampton.ac.uk/multidisciplinaryBlog: http://blog.soton.ac.uk/multidisciplinary/tag/mdrweek/Youtube: Search #MDRWeek Follow us on Twitter @Multisoton #MDRWeek

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