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6 academic vocabulary
 

6 academic vocabulary

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  • We introduced academic vocabulary in the fall, so now we are going to review and go a little deeper. From discussing the shifts to understanding what these changes in instruction will look like in a classroom
  • The CCSS places a strong focus on the acquisition or high utility, sophisticated vocabulary… What is vocabulary that should be taught? What do teachers think vocabulary is? What do our students think vocabulary is? What does the CC say vocabulary is?
  • We examined these standards yesterday when we were discussing vocabulary. Today, let’s revisit the integration of the vocabulary standards: we have highlighted the vocabulary aspects in each of these CCR anchor standards.
  • “ Applying academic vocabulary accurately in speech.”
  • Let’s review the three tiers: Tier 1 words are the most basic words in our oral lexicon and rarely require instructional attention. They are words that students learn and use in every day conversation and are found in texts intended for young and developing readers. Tier 1 words are the most frequently used in text and comprise approximately 80% of the texts we read. These are words that require little, if any instructional time. Examples: baby, happy, clock, hungry Tier 2 words are of high frequency for mature language users and are found across a variety of domains. These are words that are seen across disciplines and in later grades. Words not typically common to oral language High-frequency words for mature language users Words more typically found in written language Examples: coincidence, absurd, industrious, fortunate Tier 3 words are word that are very rare or domain-specific whose frequency are low and often limited to specific domains. These are the ones you “go over” quickly and give a brief explanation or words that are best learned when needed in a content area. Examples: glossary words, ameba, isotope, lathe, peninsula CCSS: Tier One words are the words of everyday speech usually learned in the early grades, albeit not at the same rate by all children. They are not considered a challenge to the average native speaker, though English language learners of any age will have to attend carefully to them. While Tier One words are important, they are not the focus of this discussion. Tier Two words (what the Standards refer to as general academic words) are far more likely to appear in written texts than in speech. They appear in all sorts of texts: informational texts (words such as relative , vary , formulate , specificity , and accumulate ), technical texts ( calibrate , itemize , periphery ), and literary texts ( misfortune , dignified , faltered , unabashedly ). Tier Two words often represent subtle or precise ways to say relatively simple things— saunter instead of walk , for example. Because Tier Two words are found across many types of texts, they are highly generalizable. Tier Three words (what the Standards refer to as domain-specific words) are specific to a domain or field of study ( lava , carburetor , legislature , circumference , aorta ) and key to understanding a new concept within a text. Because of their specificity and close ties to content knowledge, Tier Three words are far more common in informational texts than in literature. Recognized as new and “hard” words for most readers (particularly student readers), they are often explicitly defined by the author of a text, repeatedly used, and otherwise heavily scaffolded (e.g., made a part of a glossary).
  • Introduction to vocabulary – what is it and how to instruction around it.
  • Ask participants to gather and write academic vocabulary words on sticky notes. The notion of tiers of words is not precise, and if you were to identify tier two words from this selection, you may not choose all of the same words that we have. After they have found academic vocabulary words, click to show the words we chose. The tier two words that we identified in the first section are as follows: Courage: Curious: Ancient: Enormous: Hunched Timid: Currents:
  • Startled: Trembled: Hesitation:
  • Snatched: Flailed: Surfaced:
  • Now you have all these words on your sticky notes and you need to decide which ones to teach. From academic vocabulary rubric let’s decide which ones to teach. These questions will eventually become second nature as you learn to select vocabulary words.
  • Surfaced: Worthy of teaching because students will see it across disciplines
  • Startled: Tell it because students cannot get the meaning from context and is significant to the meaning of the text. Students will not see the word across disciplines.
  • Hunched Not address because students can obtain meaning from context
  • Choose a short excerpt from your text. Choose words that you think your students will not know and apply them to the rubric. Participants put their words in the participant notes box to use for later in their lesson. It’s another piece of the puzzle!
  • Our goal for teaching the words. How to teach the words.

6 academic vocabulary 6 academic vocabulary Presentation Transcript

  • Summer Institute 2012 Part 2English Language Arts Section NCDPI
  • Academic VocabularyParticipants will learnhow to identify Tier 2words and determinewhich ones to teach.
  • “Vocabulary” in the StandardsR.CCR.4 - Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text,including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings,and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.L.CCR.3 – Apply knowledge of language to understand howlanguage functions in different contexts, to make effective choicesfor meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when readingor listening.L.CCR.4 - Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown andmultiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues,analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general andspecialized reference materials, as appropriate.
  • “Vocabulary” in the StandardsL.CCR.5 - Demonstrate understanding of figurative language,word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.L.CCR.6 - Acquire and use accurately a range of generalacademic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient forreading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and careerreadiness level; demonstrate independence in gatheringvocabulary knowledge when encountering an unknown termimportant to comprehension or expression.
  • “Vocabulary” in the StandardsSL.CCR.3 – Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, anduse of evidence and rhetoric.SL.CCR.6 - Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicativetasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicatedor appropriate.
  • Choosing Words to TeachThree Tiers of WordsTier 1 – most basic words of oral language andrarely require instructional attention (80% of text)Tier 2 – words that are more sophisticated andused often across disciplinesTier 3 – words that are very rare or apply tospecific domains
  • Identifying and Teaching Tier 2 WordsAcademic Vocabulary talk by Sue Pimentel (auth
  • Which words are worthy of instruction? Students are likely to see the word often in other texts and across domains. The word will be useful in students’ writing. The word relates to other words or ideas that the students know or have been learning. Word choice has significance in the text. The context does not provide enough information for students to infer the meaning.
  • Academic Vocabulary Instruction Not address Criteria to determine which words toTier 2 Words Tell teach: Worthy Students are likely to see the word often in other texts and across domains. The word will be useful in students’ writing. The word relates to other words or ideas that the students know or have been learning. Word choice has significance in the text. The context does not provide enough information for students to infer the meaning.
  • Academic Vocabulary Instruction Not address Criteria to determine which words to Tier 2 Words Tell teach: Worthy X Students are likely to see the wordsurfaced often W in other texts and across domains. X The word will be useful in students’ writing. X The word relates to other words or ideas that the students know or have been learning. X Word choice has significance in the text. X The context does not provide enough information for students to infer the meaning.
  • Academic Vocabulary Instruction Not address Criteria to determine which words to Tier 2 Words Tell teach: Worthy Students are likely to see the wordstartled often in other texts and across T domains. X The word will be useful in students’ writing. X The word relates to other words or ideas that the students know or have been learning. X Word choice has significance in the text. X The context does not provide enough information for students to infer the meaning.
  • Academic Vocabulary Instruction Not address Criteria to determine which words to Tier 2 Words Tell teach: Worthy Students are likely to see the wordhunched often in other texts and across N domains. The word will be useful in students’ writing. The word relates to other words or ideas that the students know or have been learning. X Word choice has significance in the text. The context does not provide enough information for students to infer the meaning.
  • Your TurnUsing an excerpt from the text you chose:•Identify the words your students may notknow.•Identify the Tier 2 words.•Use the rubric to determine which words toteach.
  • Rich Vocabulary InstructionThe goal of vocabulary instruction is forstudents to know words well, be able toexplain them, and use them in multiplecontexts.We want students to “own” the word.