Ethnographic research final - graduate design management

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This is a final project for class 711 Contextual Methods of research ( ethnography ) with our topic focus being the innovative role of today's community library.

This is a final project for class 711 Contextual Methods of research ( ethnography ) with our topic focus being the innovative role of today's community library.

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  • 1. the next chapter The Next Chapter RAS Report re-imagining the communit y library for future generations i Aidenn Mullen + Kirk Rhodes + Mark Guarraia Methods of Contextual Research Fall 2013
  • 2. Introduction Cover to Cover This report is the result of a month of observations and interviews within the community library culture. We chose the community library due to our common interest in supporting local education and the power of communal progress. 40 + The Next Chapter Introduction 4 ii unique discussion guides 30 + 12 3 observation hours stakeholder intervie ws unique insight models Distinct Geogr aphic locations
  • 3. Introduction The Next Chapter Introduction the team iii aidenn mullen kirk rhodes mark guarraia Designer 11 years experience Sr. Graphic Designer 9 years experience Sr. Human Factors Industrial Designer 8 years experience Winston-Salem, NC Orlando, FL Providence, RI
  • 4. Introduction Table of Contents analysis documents synthesis documents project overview 11 research encounters 28 group 2 SWOT model 46 Aidenn’s insight reports 3 opportunity statement 12 field observations 29 Aidenn’s models 50 Kirk’s insight reports 4 research questions 13 ethnographic interviews 33 Kirk’s models 54 Mark’s insight reports 5 project scope 14 40 Mark’s models 58 opportunity map 6 value proposition 16 interview with a member 59 opportunities 7 project methodology 18 interview with a non-member 63 potential designs 8 project matrix 19 interview with an expert 9 iv fieldwork 2 The Next Chapter Introduction design + planning project timeline 21 field guides interview with a librarian 23 field sites 24 working walls appendix 68 additional field guides 73 works cited
  • 5. the next chapter The Next Chapter Design + Planning design + pl anning 1
  • 6. Group 2 project overview The Next Chapter Design + Planning Libraries of yesterday began with efforts to organize documents as a collection. The interests of forming the first library included accessibility to organized information, specifically within the educational role of a community. 2 Now, libraries are a cultural center for many communities, although their function and usefulness vary greatly from location to location. Specifically with the advent of new technologies, libraries have attempted to–and in some cases been forced to–adjust to the needs of their communities. By conducting an ethnographic study of the interactions and intentions of library visitors, members and staff, we will assess the attraction and future direction of America’s community libraries.
  • 7. Group 2 Opportunity Statement The Next Chapter Design + Planning Through this research study, there is an opportunity to uncover rich insights about America’s community libraries–spaces often overlooked, undervalued, and misunderstood. 3 As a result of this study, we hope to understand 1. where community libraries provide the most value for members, 2. where they can improve their services and accessibility, and 3. how we can evolve today’s libraries and construct tomorrow’s libraries to truly reflect the anticipated needs of members. By doing so, we also have the opportunity to understand what may draw outsiders into their community libraries in the years ahead.
  • 8. Group 2 research questions 1. How are community libraries defining themselves? The Next Chapter Design + Planning 2. Where are there opportunities for libraries to change and grow to meet the evolving needs of their members and communities? 4 3. What is the current relationship between communities and their libraries, and what are the libraries doing to create, foster, and maintain this?
  • 9. Group 2 project scope We began the planning of our study by exploring topics of individual interest and then sharing them with our class peers. We discussed the feasibility of topics, access to spaces and the barriers associated with gatekeepers and stakeholders. In order to ensure the group topic of choice would be accessible for all we began by observing the top areas of interest. The Next Chapter Design + Planning As a group, we then decided to focus on a place within the community that may have positive and negative perceptions of its purpose, the community library. 5 The decision of the community library as a topic of ethnographic research was then validated by a week long process of gathering secondary research to frame our initial insights. Questions posed from our initial step of research included the immediate relevance of the community library within the age of technology, how the community uses the space and an interest into what could be the future of the library. As a group we decided that our enthnographic study will combine our research, analysis and synthesis of three community libraries. Our locations of study include: Providence, RI, Lewisville, NC and Orlando, FL. We then collectively decided that the analysis and synthesis of research will be derived by interviewing and observing stakeholders and a unique approach to methodology. Our methods of research include structured and unstructured interview, observations and a unique method of image sorting with stakeholders.
  • 10. Group 2 value proposition The Next Chapter Design + Planning For current, future, and prospective community library members who regularly take advantage of the associated services and spaces, this study will uncover key insights into what currently drives usage and to what will be required for community libraries of the future to remain relevant, accessible, and desirable. 6 We do this by conducting a contextual research study: observing library resource usage, surveying frequent patrons and staff, interviewing key stakeholders, attending and participating in events, and mapping activity flow. Our primary research study is fueled and informed by our comprehensive secondary research on community libraries in the United States, as well as on the regions and cities we are operating within. Unlike other studies which merely collect quantitative data on library usage to facilitate and satisfy trending demands of the community, this study additionally focuses on the perceived purpose, function and needs of the library within its community, both by it’s users and staff. The benefits of such knowledge will provide a direction for libraries to focus on to remain relevant, accessible, and desirable to their communities.
  • 11. Group 2 Project methodology 7 observations We will utilize interviews to capture experiences, histories, thoughts, predictions, and insights from many key stakeholders: current library members, library employees, and other relevant individuals. For each interview we will determine the focus according to our primary research questions (above), then probe the respondent for relating content in a semi-structured interview manner. The Next Chapter Design + Planning interviews In this study, we will rely on several observation techniques. We will spend time in community libraries, observing both members and employees. We will observe on both the macro and micro levels, and will do this during various times of the day (to get an accurate look at the cross-section of members). We will also employ shadowing techniques, following both members and employees throughout their time in the space. recordings unique method Audio or video may be captured, and notes will be recorded on a field guide. This methodology will lead to a well-rounded, informed analysis of the current state of community libraries, and may hint at what the future can look like. Our unique method of choice will be to interact with stakeholders during an image sorting exercise. Images will be chosen based on topics of library spaces, such as personal and digital spaces, community and multi-use spaces, and youth environments. Through this, we will be looking for patterns and themes to illuminate areas of need otherwise not addressed in observation and interview methods.
  • 12. Group 2 project Matrix Course Project, Part 4: Project Matrix – Group 2 / IDUS 711 / Fall 2013 8 Source of Data Research Methods Research Tools Where What do we need to know What do we need to know What do we need to know How are community libraries defining themselves? The Next Chapter Design + Planning Research Questions Librarians, Members, Partners, Secondary Sources Primary & Secondary Research Observation (Shadowing, Fly on the Wall), Interviewing Field Guide, Idea Mapping, Environment Mapping, Audio / Video, Note Transcripts Community Libraries, external Spaces with similar services Librarians, Members, Partners Image / Word Sorting, Primary & Secondary Research Observation (Shadowing, Fly on the Wall), Interviewing, Photos, Audio, Video, Field Guide notes, experience / environment mapping What is the current relationship between communities and their libraries, and what are the libraries doing to create, foster, and maintain this? Librarians, Members, Partners, Nonmembers Interviewing, Image / Word Sorting, Interviewing, Shadowing Photos, Audio, Video, Field Guide notes, experience mapping, Note Transcripts Libraries, Community Centers, Community Art Centers, Cafes, Coffee Shops, Internet Cakes, Bookstores, Higher Education Libraries Community Libraries How do stakeholders view libraries of today? Where is this information derived from? Does this align with current use? How are nonlibraries servicing users, what are the similarities / differences to how libraries are serving members? What efforts have been made to remain relevant to stakeholders? How have those been successful? Where are the opportunities for libraries to change and grow to meet the evolving needs of their members and communities? What are all the services offered at libraries currently both for members and the general public? Are there any external programs? In what ways do libraries already serve their members? Are these services specific to the library? Community / Library relationship interactions, activities, administrative External Communication , including media used What are the responses to the communication sent to members / community? Positive or Negative? Was the intended message received? What are all the community / member interactions that take place daily? Is there a pattern?
  • 13. Group 2 project Timeline Date M: 09.16.13 M: 09.23.13 M: 09.30.13 M: 10.07.13 M: 10.14.13 M: 10.21.13 M: 10.28.13 M: 11.04.13 M: 11.11.13 M: 11.18.13 Units 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Research Preparation / Practice Contact Libraries / Participants Research Activities Observations The Next Chapter Design + Planning Interviews 9 Unique Methods Analysis + Findings + Opportunity Mapping Findings Organization Opportunity Mapping Blog - www.themagnoliastudio.wordpress.com Documenting RAS Draft Finalize RAS
  • 14. the next chapter The Next Chapter Fieldwork fieldwork 10
  • 15. Group 2 Research Encounters what worked what didn’t work - Access to library staff and patrons was eventually successful. - Should have reached out to library staff sooner, to get earlier buy-in and participation. - Unique method was successful in the context of the library. Members were curious and eager to particpate. - Interviewing the experts, the librarians, gave great insights into community needs. - Observations were successful, and relatively easy as the library is already a place for study - Willingness of participants to share their experiences / frustrations with their community library The Next Chapter Fieldwork - Surprisingly easy to find non-members to speak with 11 - The image sort was very helpful, the insights being ideal vs. current helped to frame what the future might look like at the community library. - Meeting with more than one private group that meets at the library was unsuccessful, they were less concerned with the library and more concerned with meeting space. - Multiple unstructured interviews within the contextual environment were viewed as soliciting, not allowed.
  • 16. Group 2 Field Observations At our various field sites, we implemented several different research techniques. First, we did fly-on-the-wall observations within the library - in order to better understand users’ motivations and actions within the physical space. This helped us to understand WHO is using the community library, and what their primary drivers are. The Next Chapter Fieldwork Next, we shadowed individuals - we followed them as they looked for certain resources, as they interacted with library staff, as they journeyed through the physical space. This helped us uncover areas for opportunity, directly related to the functionality of the space and resources. 12 From there, we interviewed four distinct groups of people. As part of our interviews, we also conducted an image-sorting exercise - offering participants an opportunity to visually express their associations / needs / and desires of their community library. Finally, we all went back to our field sites after doing our modeling and opportunity mapping to re-observe these spaces with this additional context. 1 2 3 4 library staff library members library non-members library experts Staff members with a wide range of experience and/or years. people who frequent the library often, either as individuals or families. Those on the periphery of the community library, that do not currently use it for services or resources. Those who have studied the library on an advanced level for professional projects.
  • 17. Group 2 ethnographic interviews our interview guidelines 1. Pay attention to the ongoing and evolving dynamic of the interview - body language, cadence, etc. 2. Be sure to listen closely, and to use users’ answers as cues for follow-up and elaboration 3. Treat each interviewee with respect, and be considerate of their time and effort. 4. Be respectful of those around you while interviewing. 5. Be clear with interview expectations before diving in. The Next Chapter Fieldwork 6. Bring appropriate tools for recording research. 13 7. Probe with curiosity, asking why the particpant naturally responds to the question in the manner they do. 8. Ensure that throughout note taking you provide a textual description of the experience and the responses. 9. Re-evaluate the interview’s progress midway to ensure subject matter of research interest has been covered. We found that follow-up questions came naturally, based on the initial questioning from our discussion guide. The willingness with which participants spoke about their experience with the community library helped to fuel secondary questions - things like ‘well can you tell me about that experience?’ ‘How did you find out about that event?’ ‘How do you access that information you are referencing?’, etc. With our library expert, Stephanie (an architect), we found that we had additional questions based on our personal interests in design. We had to be sure to separate our biases and individual questions in order to stick to our initial discussion guide.
  • 18. Aidenn Mullen interview with a librarian on this library and libraries in general on your job and experience with this library What do you think is the purpose or benefit of having a library? … of this library? Does this library offer you everything you would like from it? Are there things that are not offered here that you would otherwise utilize on a regular basis? We are here to provide the community with a space to acquire knowledge, and to serve as a place to keep the communities’ resources safe and in order so everyone can access them. It offers things we never had before in the old library but I would like to see more large meeting spaces. Do you think the library currently serves the same purpose it did ten, fifteen years ago? Please explain. The Next Chapter Fieldwork head librarian 14 Merrikay, 57 Have you ever worked with a group at the library? How do you see groups vs individuals utilizing the library? Fifteen years ago the library was for homework and research. Now, the library is more for recreation than homework. Today the library is here to bridge the digital divide for those that do not haev personal digital access. I do work with a group here on a personal level. I am on the board for the Lewisville Historical Society. The library is a great meeting place for this group because we have all the resources we need right here. How has this library changed over the past five years? Can you give me some examples of programs, offerings, functions, etc.? Can you tell me about the skills / services you can offer in this particular library? This community library now helps to define the community, it is the opportunity space for this environment. What would you say are the strengths of this library? Reference, Knowledge and Programming. Where do you see this specific library five years from now? About the same, maybe better technology. Reference, young adult, youth, adult services - and we specialize in the circulation of non-fiction books in the county. Are there times when you or the library is unable to offer assistance to a member? Can you give an example? What did you do? What did the member do? These are rare, mostly they are when people have a very specific resource topic and we simply do not have the reference books that the central library does. They are the branch for research currently. But we can also request books if we are given the time.
  • 19. Aidenn Mullen interview with a librarian cont’d on the community engagement of this library and libraries in general I see this happening with school children. It would be nice to have a heads up on specific assigned topics b/c we could be prepared when the students request them. It is frustrating to have to let them down. We want them to come here for their research. What services are most utilized by the community? What services do you think would or should be utilized more often? What is preventing that from happening? Meetings mostly, the only problem is that we need more meeting space. The Next Chapter Fieldwork head librarian 15 Merrikay, 57 Who would you say utilizes the library’s current resources the most / most effectively? Families, Youth, Seniors and some students. Is there any type of person in the community that you would wish to see utilizing the library more… if so, tell me about that / why? Teens, they have the technology so they don’t come in anymore. Can you tell me - is your member population on the incline or on the decline? For how long has this been a trend, and to what do you attribute this to? Incline, our memberships doubled after the new library was built in 2007. Are there opportunities for our library to gain new members? How would you suggest that this is communicated? If we had better and more computers.
  • 20. Aidenn Mullen interview with a member on this library and libraries in general on your experience with this library What do you think is the purpose or benfit of having a community library? For how long have you been coming to this library? Have you seen the library change since joining? The library to me is for a variety of media access and to help you find what you need. What is it that people need? Information that is difficult to find, like things that are historical mostly. About 15 yrs. There hasn’t been much change. Just the new library. It’s much bigger but the feeling is the same. Do your friends or family members utilize the community library? Can you list reasons why members need the library? The Next Chapter Fieldwork in-frequent member 16 Tracy, 39 My son does, he’s in college. He uses his university library to study all the time. Because everything is digital now, if you don’t have the technology it’s the only place to go for free. Mothers with children also go to the library, and seniors. Have their been occasions when the library has been a solution for a problem you have had? Who are those that choose not to utilize this service? Teens and mid 20’s. They have the technology. How often do you come to the community library? Not very often, not as much as I’d like. Its’s far from my house. Just when I’ve been looking into my family history, researching articles, images, etc. How do you stay up to date with community library offerings? I don’t. There’s no communication currently. I guess if I needed to know something I would try the website first. Do you feel like you are getting your money’s worth from your communtiy library? Yes, I feel that some people use it more than I do. I definetly don’t want to see it go away.
  • 21. Aidenn Mullen interview with a member cont’d on the community engagement of this library and libraries in general From your perspective, what do you think this library’s main priority is when serving the community? Their priority is to be family oriented. Does this library offer everything you want from it? Are there things that are not offered here that you would otherwise utilize on a regular basis? Yes, I’d like to start reading ebooks on my kindle but I don’t know how. The Next Chapter Fieldwork casual member 17 Tracy, 39 How would you find out how to rent ebooks? I guess I’d call the librarian or ask a friend. Where do you go that is similar to the library and why? I do go to Barnes and Noble alot. I go there more often. What do you like about Barnes and Noble? I love the knick nacks, the stationary and the tea.
  • 22. Kirk Rhodes interview with a non-member on this library and libraries in general Have you received information about the library even though you do not attend? How was this communicated? No, I have never received information. I have heard other people talking about how they use it, but I’ve never been the recipient of information. Also, I think they have a sign or something outside? Is the community library irrelevant? The Next Chapter Fieldwork un-satisfied citizen 18 Paul, 35 Well, for me I think it is. Isn’t it just for kids? I mean, I know a lot of families that use the library, but I’m assuming that people my age are using the internet to find their information. I guess I understand there’s a value to it, I just don’t think it’s valuable to me. Hmm, I guess long story short I”m sure the community library is not irrelevant, but it seemingly is for me. Where do you go first for information? Oh, I always check the internet first. Specifically Google, and depending on what I’m looking for, I’ll toggle between tabs (web, image, news, etc.). on your experience with this library Why don’t you go to your community library? Like I said, I just don’t think it has things I need. I guess if there’s a specific BOOK or reference material i’m looking for, I will go there to find it. But honestly, since leaving college, I don’t really see the need to use my community library. Perhaps I was spoiled by my academic library?.. When was the last time you went to your community library? How do you envision the community library - what is it offering, from your past experience? Honestly, the last time I went there was last year to vote. Other than that, I can’t remember. And it’s odd, I’m not sure I’ve actually been IN the main hall of the library, just the secondary spaces that functions and events take place in. What is your perception of the community library? Do you have any experiences that stand out to you? As I said, I perceive it as a place for children and families, not people in my age range. My friends who have children tell me that they use it for events the library hosts. OH, and I heard the neighborhood hosts concerts here, as well - but I’ve never gone. Come to think of it, I bet the library actually IS doing a lot more than offering books and magazines… But even that said, I’m not sure I’m the ideal person to use the library in the near future. Unless there is something really relevant that I actually find out about! Do you know anyone that regularly goes to the library? Yeah, like I mentioned, many of my friends who have children use the library. They say they do reading groups or something for their children. Seems to make a lot of sense for them. Other than that, I think some of the ladies in my neighborhood are part of the Edgewood Garden Club, and they apparently meet at the library weekly or monthly?”
  • 23. Mark Guarraia interview with an expert on libraries as evolving spaces When thinking about designing a new community library, what were some of the things you took into account? Well, we looked at studies, all the books in the library (count), we spoke to a library consultant & she did an analysis, we referenced the San Jose public library model. Who did you find is accessing the library most frequently? Our main target was families with young children, teens and seniors. The Next Chapter Fieldwork library architect 19 Stephanie, 31 Were there any strategic initiatives brought to you when considering the design of this new community space? If so, who were these proposed by? Space wise we knew we wanted to make sure of a few things : that the seating in comfortable,that books are more accessible (like a bookstore),that we use a similar marketing approach to that of what bookstores use, that the amount of books would likely decrease and that technology would likely increase in the future and that the community needed a meeting space b/c such a location did not exist in the town. As an architect, did you bring any new strategies for the stakeholder review panel to consider? If so, what were they and where did they come from? Our firm’s pitch was that: (1) We had never designed a library before so newness was entirely possible and that (2) we strongly believed that the library could be “ A new center, a new heart and a new meeting place that could be theirs forever.” Was attracting new members part of your strategy when setting out to design a new library? If so, how did you go about solving for this? Yes, we wanted to help the space appeal to different people for economic reasons. To attract the new members: - needed a dedicated room for computer classes - needed a large meeting space for things like yoga,movies and special event spacing as a financial tool - also, ESL is an opportunity on working with and within the community How does Tiverton (host community for new library) differ in its needs from a more urban community library? Did you happen to study other models when designing this new space? To me, the people are the same. The resources, technology and planning would also be the same. The difference would be structural - like a three stroy building versus a one story build. Were there any surprising requests from the community as you set out to design this new space? Surprises were that the building commitee decided on making sure the
  • 24. Mark Guarraia interview with an expert cont’d library had event space and that we were able to design and keep the clock tower b/c it offers a community service. Budget is always tough but in the end we all wanted the library to be a landmark and the clock tower helps us do just that. Were you met with any community opposition when discussing plans for the new library? If so, what did they pertain to? It was over the clock tower and how much money we could save from budget if we removed it. The Next Chapter Fieldwork library architect 20 Stephanie, 31 on designing a physical space What are some new technologies we could observe walking into your new library? Large LCD screens, a mobile teleconference unit, and a self checkout kiosk area to free up the librarian’s time.
  • 25. Group 2 Field guides primary research questions 1. How are community libraries defining themselves? 2. Where are there opportunities for libraries to change and grow to meet the evolving needs of their members and communities? 3. What is the current relationship between communities and their libraries, and what are the libraries doing to create, foster, and maintain this? librarian interview questions What do you think is the purpose or benefit of having a library? … of this library? The Next Chapter Fieldwork Do you think the library currently serves the same purpose it did ten, fifteen years ago? Please explain. 21 How has this library changed over the past five years? Can you give me some examples of programs, offerings, functions, etc.? What would you say are the strengths of this library? Where do you see this specific library five years from now? Does this library offer you everything you would like from it? Are there things that are not offered here that you would otherwise utilize on a regular basis? Have you ever worked with a group at the library? How do you see groups vs individuals utilizing the library? Can you tell me about the skills / services you can offer in this particular library? Are there times when you or the library is unable to offer assistance to a member? Can you give an example? What did you do? What did the member do? What services are most utilized by the community? What services do you think would or should be utilized more often? What is preventing that from happening? Who would you say utilizes the library’s current resources the most / most effectively? Is there any type of person in the community that you would wish to see utilizing the library more… if so, tell me about that / why? Can you tell me - is your member population on the incline or on the decline? For how long has this been a trend, and to what do you attribute this to? Are there opportunities for our library to gain new members? How would you suggest that this is communicated? member interview questions What do you think is the purpose or benfit of having a community library? What is it that people need? Can you list reasons why members need the library? Who are those that choose not to utilize this service? How often do you come to the community library?
  • 26. Group 2 Field guides cont’d For how long have you been coming to this library? Have you seen the library change since joining? Do your friends or family members utilize the community library? Do your friends or family members utilize the community library? Have their been occasions when the library has been a solution for a problem you have had? Have their been occasions when the library has been a solution for a problem you have had? How do you stay up to date with community library offerings? How do you stay up to date with community library offerings? Do you feel like you are getting your money’s worth from your communtiy library? From your perspective, what do you think this library’s main priority is when serving the community? From your perspective, what do you think this library’s main priority is when serving the community? Does this library offer everything you want from it? Are there things that are not offered here that you would otherwise utilize on a regular basis? The Next Chapter Fieldwork Does this library offer everything you want from it? Are there things that are not offered here that you would otherwise utilize on a regular basis? 22 non-member interview questions What do you think is the purpose or benfit of having a community library? What is it that people need? Can you list reasons why members need the library? Who are those that choose not to utilize this service? How often do you come to the community library? For how long have you been coming to this library? Have you seen the library change since joining? Do you feel like you are getting your money’s worth from your communtiy library? library expert interview questions What do you think is the purpose or benfit of having a community library? What is it that people need? Can you list reasons why members need the library? Who are those that choose not to utilize this service? How often do you come to the community library? For how long have you been coming to this library? Have you seen the library change since joining? Do your friends or family members utilize the community library? Have their been occasions when the library has been a solution for a problem you have had?
  • 27. Group 2 Field sites mark guarraia conducted research at the Maitland Library conducted research at the William Hall Library Lewisville, NC 23 kirk rhodes conducted research at the Lewisville Library The Next Chapter Fieldwork aidenn mullen Maitland, FL Cranston, RI The Lewisville Library is positioned at the center of the community. The structure is a visual display of how the community has introduced modernity in a manner that compliments the historical ideals of small town America. Since being founded in 1896, the Maitland Library has always had strong roots in the community. Thirty citizens raised the initial money to build it, and others as recent as a decade ago saved it from being sold to the county. It is currently owned by the city and run by the staff through a library non-profit organization; a unique hybrid model that gives allows it to keep it’s personality with a smaller budget. The William Hall Library is a beloved resource for this small, densely populated suburban community, offering resources, programs, and educational opportunities. Founded in 1897, this library has been a walkable destination for families and individuals alike.
  • 28. Group 2 The Next Chapter Fieldwork working wall Aidenn 24
  • 29. Group 2 The Next Chapter Fieldwork working wall Kirk 25
  • 30. Group 2 The Next Chapter Fieldwork working wall Mark 26
  • 31. The Next Chapter Analysis Documents 27 the next chapter analysis documents
  • 32. Group 2 Model Swot analysis Strengths Weaknesse s free resources community programming ability to know/meet your neighbors members feel a part of community inclusion teach children life lessons (borrowing something and returning it) community center of the future anticipating community needs place that feels shared intra-library loan/reciprocals provides volunteer opportunities to community e marketing to members marketing to non-members appeal to teenagers and young adults innovation within programming (repetitive) hours of operation reliance on the library legacy funding/fundraising abilties physical/public accessibility external/digital communication Internal Factors no digital mobility perceived relevancy perceived expertise (no longer temple of knowledge) The Next Chapter Analysis Documents school system library awareness program 28 recruit private corporation to a share meeting, entreprenuers? virtual library portal application at schools, colleges, appletv, etc. social media library presence at outside community events establish partnership to form mobile library programs Positive 1. The Library is the only neutral environment where members of a community can meet comfortably and without cost. 2. Quote “Libraries are the community centers of the future, we have resources (computers,books) and spaces.” 3. Today’s community libraries rely heavily on fundraising from volunteer groups to purchase a wide variety of needed items. Opportunities community college partnerships discoveries big box bookstores resource driven cultural centers online libraries specialized libraries accessibility of internet at home funding & resources public perception of relevancy aging expertise younger generations don’t grow up with library digital divide building maintenance library legacy preschool Negative External Factors 4. Bridging the gap of digital users and library users has been difficult if those targeted do not use the library for community meetings, research, recreational reading or attending events. 5. The freedom of digital mobility is of high value. Members attending teh library have tehse artifacts brought into the library continually.
  • 33. Aiden Mullen Model positioning map useful for the community website Discovery : majority of youth activity is only 2-5 yrs of age. Groups are being alienated. The Next Chapter Analysis Documents Discovery : what’s inside? observed members are more attracted to analog text when the ideas inside are expressed visually to grab their eye. 29 youth activity Discovery : void of social media, need for communication must be sought out directly. auditorium copy center exterior of library center of community study room historical reference library online library utilized digitization station self checkout discovery : need for resources, marketing revitalization Discovery : no member demographics drawn from library membership other than the count of members. Also, no individual identification on cards. Often, this is the first card a child has to utilize on their own which leads to responsibility and self confidence. physical card paper flyer marketing library hours community marketing not useful for the community reference books Discovery : Library is the hub of community history, a few pieces on display and analog. Need: visual and communicative events for wide target audience appeal. under utilized Discovery : in need of Sunday hours
  • 34. Aiden Mullen Model empathy map “without the library there is not a place within the community to acquire knowledge.” cuts in funding we need space to meet inventory is being evalauted The Next Chapter Analysis Documents Hearing 30 Its impossible to reach members that cannot get here on their own. “this community is very important to me.” maintaining target audience Empathy map traditional library marketing our new library doubled our membership and it continues to grow other libraries need our books “children love the library” “no one knows how to use the digitization station” Merrikay, Head Librarian “can we partner more with the elementary school?” Pains positive encouraging an expert articulates value of library vip member of the community dedicated Seeing even art is a part of the library “alot of members use the computers” Gains “we have space for people to spread out”
  • 35. Aiden Mullen Model empathy map membership is growing, “libraries are the community centers if the future, we have the resources at our we need space to meet Its impossible to reach members that cannot get here on their own. scheduled for each day” inventory is being evaluated The Next Chapter Analysis Documents Hearing 31 “can we partner more with the elementary school?” “without the library there is not a place “statistics are evaluated for need, within the community to we need to take care of circulation acquire knowledge.” cuts in funding Discovery: Those that Tho cannot reach the l he library t have themselves do not ha the opportunity rtifa to see value, utilize artifacts/services. These potential adopters ma be the may target audience that truly needs eds what the library has to offer? “this com community is very impo important to me.” Discovery: Quantitative research is the only way to demonstrate ne e need to congressman, for example, to gainmaintaining ple, n additonal funding or staffing. affing Empathy map our new library doubled our membership and it continues to grow “children love the library” “no one knows how to use the digitization station” other libraries need our books funds for The “Friends of Lewsiville Library” fundrasing group is the only source of additional revenue needed.” Generally, the group raises money within the internal library space and with similar artifacts offered at the library for no cost. has made alot once again, more than one book sale event.” a computer again n Pains target audience traditional library marketing “I need help with topics.” members what they need Merrikay, Head Librarian positive encouraging an expert articulates value of library vip member of the community dedicated our wish list just keeps getting longer.” Seeing even art is a part of the library “alot of members use the computers” Discovery: L ry: Librarians are also ead community leaders. The position has potential to com communicate value mmun to teh external community, My community library d is also centrally located to leverage such awareness. Gains gets together in a shared space to work towards a common goal. “we have space for people to spread out”
  • 36. Aiden Mullen Model Affinity Diagram target audience The Next Chapter Analysis Documents space 32 - Need: flexible hours in programming - Need: external book return - Member mobility needs - Surprise: member meeting space need - Surprise: 100+ meetings per month - “Libraries are the community centers of the future” - Library exists only within one structure - Need: Staff to break away from service desk - Everyone is included - Recreational - Comfortable - Not overused place for free digital use - Community History Large Print Collections Literacy Early Learning Volunteers Members of Fundraising Groups Top Tier Circulation Statistics A place for children Elders Children / Families late adopters - Need: Bridge digital divide for generations of non-users of library - Non-users attending other venues serving similar service/need - Public perception negative - Library is archaic ideal - “The only place we can all share.” - “Libraries will always be here” - “The communities resource for knowledge” - “We need a bit more fun here, it’s too serious.” marketing - Increase online library communication - Limited external reach - Update internal reach - Need: Marketing and service design education & software - Need: Social media as a marketing tool - Librarians are marketers - Libraries are the communities one place for assistance in making decisions - Need: Fundamental and ongoing ways of fundraising developed and communicated - Community involved in financial need - No cost for learning - Need: Visual display of reward and giving - Need: Qualitative and Quantitative data to display need
  • 37. Kirk Rhodes Model Venn Diagram discoveries 1. When members check out at the circulation desk information is often recorded for need and that feedback is often filtered into circulation statistics. The Next Chapter Analysis Documents 2. Many decisions at the community library are a matter of heirarchy. Feedback is often put into action when it is delivered through the Board and City Council. 33 3. The community population that has access to and may utilize the community library makes for a very high population to library staff/space ratio. 4. The Friends of the Library have a quadrant of power over the community and it’s governing bodies.
  • 38. Kirk Rhodes Model personas 34 the mom 40 - 60 Primarily female Working Professional The Next Chapter Analysis Documents the bookworm 28 - 40 Female Primarily stay-at-home, or work-from-home mother PROFILE • enjoys recreational reading, mostly fiction, mostly paperbacks • has been going to the library weekly for entire adult life • knows the librarian at the circulation desk, but doesn’t stop to chit-chat • she reads from the library to save money and not clutter her house with books she doesn’t have to buy “I go to the library because it’s a lot cheaper than buying all my books at the local bookstore. Either way, I’ll be reading. The library also let’s me discover old classics, which are rarely featured in bookstores. Visiting the library has become as much of a routine as reading a book a week. I don’t need the programs or classes, just the books.” PROFILE • enjoys recreational reading, mostly fiction, mostly paperbacks • has been going to the library weekly for entire adult life • knows the librarian at the circulation desk, but doesn’t stop to chit-chat • she reads from the library to save money and not clutter her house with books she doesn’t have to buy “I go to the library because I want my kids to be smart and learn to read quickly. There’s a lot of free programs between all the different libraries and community centers, so I let my kids decide which ones they want to go to. Once they start Kindergarten though, I won’t be visiting the library much.”
  • 39. Kirk Rhodes Model personas 35 the retiree 9 - 14 Male and Female Full-time student, public school, living at home with parents The Next Chapter Analysis Documents the student 60 + Male and Female Living at home, close to community library PROFILE • enjoys recreational reading, mostly fiction, mostly paperbacks • has been going to the library weekly for entire adult life • knows the librarian at the circulation desk, but doesn’t stop to chit-chat • she reads from the library to save money and not clutter her house with books she doesn’t have to buy “I go to the library because I’ve been told by my teacher and parents that I need to do get the required information for my school project. I like the experience of the library... it’s still new to me, and since I have limited access and experience with researching on the internet, I like being able to pursue the shelves and pick out whatever I want. Especially DVDs on my subject.” PROFILE • enjoys recreational reading, mostly fiction, mostly paperbacks • has been going to the library weekly for entire adult life • knows the librarian at the circulation desk, but doesn’t stop to chit-chat • she reads from the library to save money and not clutter her house with books she doesn’t have to buy “I go to the library because the computer lets me see pictures and read about my children and grandkids. I also have to fill out forms occasionally for my veteran benefits, and the librarians help me. In addition to seeing friends everytime I come, the library offers educational classes on practical subjects like wills & trusts, which is perfect for me.”
  • 40. Kirk Rhodes Model personas discoveries The Next Chapter Analysis Documents 1. There are so many different types of people that visit the Maitland City library that it was difficult to narrow them down. I chose these four based on the characteristics I saw in other typical library visitors. So while Maitland may enjoy a little more diverse selection of people to it’s stacks and programs, the four listed here are the biggest and most common amongst the rest of the Orlando area libraries. 36 2. Social aspect / physical community of the library is an overarching motivation for two of the groups - the mom, and the retiree. The other two groups, interestingly, are task-oriented and use the library purely for the free resources they cannot find elsewhere. 3. Four distinct user groups do not have any opportunity or need to interact with each other. They are casually aware of the others’ existence at the library, but have no opportunity to cross paths. This is most likely due to the fact that their needs at the library are very different.
  • 41. Kirk Rhodes Model Affinity Diagram Programs Competition Community Relations • free / good for budget • the internet • known for friendly atmosphere • printed monthly event calendar • diverse offerings • Senior Center (next door) • printed mailers to local non-patrons • youth services ranked #1 (image sort) • Civic Center (next door with parking) • Circulation librarians - know most people’s names - given power to reduce fines - smile at everyone - aide those on computers The Next Chapter Design + Planning • princess tea had almost 200 girls 37 • storytimes regularly have 100 kids - teaches parents too - how many kids learn how to read - most popular event (1-4) • adventures with books (5-8) • a break for moms • air-conditioned events • allow students to volunteer • community outreach (Leu Gardens) • cooking classes • human-guided computer classes • adult programs as continuing education • Jewish Community Center • local schools • churches • Fedex Office • lake culture (farmer’s market) • Starbucks + other coffeeshops • grocery stores • a place kids learn how to read • DVD’s and Chilren’s picture books are the most circulated items • reciprocals set up with Orange county but not Seminole county • absorbed many WFCF (Work Force Central Florida) clients when office shut down • Director keep good standing with City Council and rubs shoulders with local business owners • Summertime Reading is a big connection point, as the librarians help create the list and offer programs surrounding them External Communication • many patrons pick up calendars at events or programs • monthly calendar + Director email • email blast for special events • updated website with news + calendar • booths at festivals where you can sign up for card • librarians share professionally with other libraries at conferences • used to have city put the upcoming library events at the bottom of everyone’s monthly energy bill
  • 42. Kirk Rhodes Model Affinity Diagram Strengths Member Identified Weaknesses Member Identified Strengths Staff Identified Weaknesses Staff Identified • feels friendlier than other libraries • perception of library as old, stale, dank, musty, boring... a dull, onesize-fits-all approach • library already centered on community involvement as future • ran out of space years ago; want to build two more stories • lots of diverse programs: cultural cooking, yoga, wills + trusts, storytimes, book clubs, etc. • little parking • storytimes with Jonathan • poor lighting • zones for talking and studying • too little space... the kids section is crammed at the back of the library, the courtyard is barely used • teenagers enjoy volunteering The Next Chapter Introduction • no time limit or cost to use computer 38 • librarians at the circulation desk know regular’s names, even if a “street guy” • Director knows or greets everyone • “take a chance with kids”... a child hasn’t broken one of the real china tea cups yet during Princess Tea • aid patrons in filling out unemployment, renwing driver’s license, getting food stamps, etc • open policy... all programs (and most offices) are open to public • there is no media or computer lab • difficult to find information on website • dying art scene • perception of library as service + entertainment for the lower class • only one large community room to reserve or rent... no smaller or coworking spaces • volunteers + assistants aren’t trained adequately for situations involving anger, confessions, or the homeless • 115yr history in community • expert staff has years of experience • embraced change with new director • re-organized front room for adults: fiction, study, quiet, away from kids • the community asks for what it wants • mantra: “how can we help you?” • Director delegates power and encourages staff to exercise their own creativity and expertise • Director’s passion and influence with City Council + local business owners • cross-training model where all staff cycles through circulation desk • membership #s up since new director • open to new ideas from outsiders (like this study) • the library looks cluttered; a nicer, newer-looking space would also bring in new people • poor lighting • can’t teach multimedia classes without a computer lab (competitor, the Senior Center next door, has one) • prime staff members occasionally aren’t given a say within programming • need volunteers to clean up after events • need an assistant for Youth Services • SirsiDynix, their book tracking management tool, has major bugs and the responsible person hasn’t been given enough time to study and adapt • staff relies on circulation desk to interact with patrons
  • 43. Kirk Rhodes Model Affinity Diagram discoveries 39 insight one The staff and patrons have different priorities motivating their children’s programming interactions. Patrons value a consistent schedule and quality of events, not necessarily the originality or difference from the previous one. The staff currently spends a lot of time trying to fulfill most of the typical holiday events as well as create exciting new subject matter for future events. The Next Chapter Introduction The biggest strength of this library is its staff. In all twelve interviews I conducted, it was always mentioned. The members thought it was because they were friendly and remembered their names, while the staff considered that only one facet of expert, experienced librarians. insight Two The library clearly understands their member’s desire for more programming, more computers, more children’s books, and more parking. It has maxed out the staff effort on the programs it has running. The majority of fundraising is done by the Friends of the Library, who run book sales and a 5K each year. Outside their allocated budget, the only other money they bring in is via late fines. insight Three The staff emphasized their duty to provide education + entertainment in an appealing manner, and nearly every one interviewed remarked how the library offers these services free of charge. Some even said most people in the library at any given time don’t have the money or budget to find such library services elsewhere (bookstore, movie theatre). insight Four
  • 44. The Next Chapter Analysis Documents Mark Guarraia Model personas 40
  • 45. The Next Chapter Analysis Documents Mark Guarraia Model personas 41
  • 46. The Next Chapter Introduction Analysis Documents Mark Guarraia Model Positioning map 42
  • 47. Mark Guarraia Model The Next Chapter Analysis Documents affinity diagram 43
  • 48. Mark Guarraia Model The Next Chapter Analysis Documents affinity diagram 44
  • 49. the next chapter The Next Chapter Synthesis Document synthesis document 45
  • 50. Aidenn Mullen Insight one The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Librarians are often overwhelmed by their daily routine, finding little time to explore community need. 46 There is an opportunity for TODAY’S LIBRARIANS TO CREATE AND IMPLEMENT AN EVOLVING SYSTEM OF USER NEEDS. How might we ... make library users more self sufficient? ... introduce qualitative findings in conjunction with quantitative analysis to demonstrate need? ... reduce administrative tasks? We could “I have to do my job before I think about doing new things.” “The library is for recreation, not homework.” “Our new library doubled our membership and it continues to grow.” “Libraries are the community centers if the future, we have the resources at our fingertips.” * Quotes above are taken from structured interviews with library staff and member image sorting activity. ... create a visual catalog of resources, easy to browse by search word. ... install visual cues for users upon entry, directing toward need. ... make the service desk digital, requires rare librarian interaction. ... digital spaces require statement of need or activity for qualitiative research. ... library volunteers are recruited via members as a resource.
  • 51. Aidenn Mullen Insight two The Next Chapter Synthesis Document There is no top user group crossover within the library space; two of which have considerable passion for the library as a desintation for recreation. 47 There is an opportunity for MEMBERS TO COLLABORATE BETWEEN EACH OTHER TO BUILD A STRONGER SENSE OF COMMUNITY. How might we ... create user group cross-over and form a more collaborative commmunity. ... converge met user groups, seniors and families? ... better visually display that the library is a recreational place for the entire community? ... communicate that the library is a destination to utilize and preserve for future generations? We could “I can’t find large print books for free anywhere else.” “My children love the library” “I get out to stay active.” “We are here for the kids Halloween books alive show.” * Quotes above are taken from families and seniors in the contextual library environment. ... engage in a community event, design a volunteer participation exercise that showcases the outcome of community collaboration towards the communities’future potential. ... host and outdoor event ( a positive visual display) based on social and recreational interaction, coincide the event with an internal fundraising event. ... develop a community history ongoing program that is participant interactive/educational and works to establish new findings with every meeting. Display progress through various forms of communication, including social media.
  • 52. Aidenn Mullen Insight three The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Bridging the gap between services offered, programs attended and spatial need is vital to the library becoming the “community center of the future.” 48 “I need help with very specific r efer ence topics .” “C an we bet ter partner with the elementary school?” “We h ave space for people to spr eadout and still feel included . ” There is an opportunity for LIBRARIANS TO ADOPT A MORE EFFICIENT MARKETING APPROACH TO REACH A WIDE VARIETY OF USER GROUPS, BOTH INTERNALLY AN EXTERNALLY. How might we - digital users -external environment -willing financial donors - members with unmet needs - be more effective with internal communication -enable communicators with effective tools -visually showcase happenings to raise awareness We could - Explore and purchase marketing design software that can enable communication to non digital users on a more sustainable level, perhaps making event flyers consolidated. - -Explore & communicate to external environments with visual methods of interaction. ex: elementary school skit explaining programs for youth. - -Establish social media sites - -Develop ebook advertisements for mobile devices, it’s a contextual environment easily within reach. Communicate via social media,
  • 53. Aidenn Mullen Insight four The Next Chapter Synthesis Document In order to further grow the library as a community destination fundraising and municipal budget must be supplemented by ongoing supplemental avenues of rasing funds. 49 There is an opportunity to INVITE THE GENERAL PUBLIC TO JOIN IN EFFORTS OF FUNDRAISING AND SUPPORTIVE NEED. SUCH A DISPLAY OF ACTIONABLE REQUESTS CAN HELP TO BUILD THE LIBRARY AS NOT ONLY A RESOURCE FOR LEARNING BUT ALSO AS THE ELEVATED DESTINATION FOR COMMUNITY COLLABORATION. How might we How can we utilize space in a more efficient manner to gain fundraising participation? We could “T he things we need h ave to be purch ased through fundr aising . T his takes alot of time , our wish list just keeps get ting longer .” “T he things we need h ave to be purch ased through fundr aising . T his takes alot of time , our wish list just keeps get ting longer .” -Take services & meetings to external library outdoor grounds to raise awareness. Further existing fundraising events by incorporating community donation to both internal and external resources? -Ensure that fundraising needs are visually communicated by designating space, show reward after event to library attendees, local paper, etc. Stay relevant within the age of technology by affording needing digital artifacts? -Establish a mobile library program, reaching stakeholders externally and more convieniently.
  • 54. Kirk Rhodes Insight one The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Members don’t utilize the expertise and experience of the library staff. 50 I’m seeking them out more than they’re seeking me out. – BR, member Members and Visitors remember the Maitland City Library because it is friendly, but only generally speaking or regarding the circulation librarians at the front desk. They don’t take the opportunity to ask for the librarian’s personal assistance. Perhaps they don’t know or think of their experience and expertise. In an internet-in-the-pocket culture, it may be easier for some people to avoid the personal interaction in lieu of Google. There is an opportunity to brand the local librarian as the source of personalized knowledge, or the conduit to all answers. How might we ... communicate to the public the quality and quantity of experience the Maitland City Library staff holds? We could Patrons are always looking for something. Our mantra here is how can we help you? – VD, staff * all staff librarians at the maitland city library have at least a decade of experience–most have two. ... build a local campaign, challenging people to “Stump the Librarian” and experiencing the library interaction. ... create an environment where it is comfortable to approach a librarian for help? ... replace all large, square-angle desks with shorter, round ones, giving the impression librarians are more accessible. ... encourage existing “users” of the experts to share their experience with others? ... ask librarians to mention to patrons the benefit of verbally sharing newly acquired knowledge as a mnemonic tool.
  • 55. Kirk Rhodes Insight Two The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Staff hinders children’s programs growth by not understanding Members’ motives. 51 By the numbers (100+ weekly), children’s storytimes are the most successful library program. This is due in a large part to the passionate performances of the Youth Services Director, who is constantly thinking up new, unique, themed parties and events. But after talking with 5 moms, the biggest concerns are convenience/schedule and quality, not subject matter. By constantly trying new things, the staff begins each project further from success, having to schedule and experiment for each event. There is an opportunity to grow the children’s programs by focusing on the mothers’ criteria as opposed to the library’s creative desires. How might we ... establish a channel of communication between the mothers and Youth Services Director? We could It doesn’t matter if I’m enjoying the program... if my kids aren’t connecting and don’t like it, we’re leaving.” – CF, member I feel most valued when I’m preforming during storytimes... I really need a fulltime assistant to keep up with all the programs. – JH, staff * there are at least a dozen types of youth services events, with new ones added each year: costumed storytimes, princess tea, cooking up culture, 45min productions of alice in wonderland, mardi gras dance party, etc. ... begin a brief question + answer session after storytime, having fore-warned, “committed” mothers get the ball rolling. ... avoid competing with the mother’s schedule, or other school and community center programs? ... create and publish a pocket-sized calendar of events, then drive members to register for events on the online calendar. ... encourage the Youth Services Director to concentrate his efforts on quality over innovation? ... introduce and pass out a short satisfaction survey at the beginning of storytime, focusing on ideal/desired quality.
  • 56. Kirk Rhodes Insight three The Next Chapter Synthesis Document The library cannot grow if limited to city budget and current fundraising methods. 52 The library is allocated a certain amount of money from the city each year, where they follow a strict, approved budget. Each year there are resources and building improvements they planned but are unable to afford. And each year the city cuts into the budget a little further. The patron-formed group Friends of the Library are tasked with making up the remainder, but in the last 75 years of service, they’ve raised $150K mostly through used booksales, and their membership is aging. This is not sustainable. ... develop relationships with new donors and potential donors? – BR, member We always build through integration with the city’s plan... we have stayed (and been constrained) to Maitland’s Cultural Corridor. – BW, board * the library is a 5013c non-profit, so it is not allowed to actively raise money for itself. other interested parties must donate the funds. There is an opportunity to allow other Patrons to join under the fundraising banner, generating additional support and camaraderie. How might we Unjust fines... misdemeanor mentality. We could ... allocate time to developing partnerships with local Maitland business owners, preferably in the library with tea. ... expand the resources and organization of the Friends of the Library to meet higher fundraising goals? ... create a pop-up library at local farmer’s markets, allowing new Friends to volunteer at a new booksale venue. ... discover and build a team of stakeholders interested and willing to commit to fundraising for the library? ... have a director cast a vision at all programs and events, visually announcing what the fundraising efforts will go to.
  • 57. Kirk Rhodes Insight Four The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Free services are a valuable commodity when they’re offered for a price elsewhere. 53 FedexOffice, one block away from the Maitland City Library, charges $5 per hour to use a computer. A block in the other direction is the neighborhood pharamacy, with a RedBox out front that charges $1.29 per DVD per night. A mile down the street is a Barnes & Noble. In the present economy, bugets have become more important than ever. The library not only offers these services free, but offers educational classes and experts to answer questions. There is an opportunity to capitalize on the state of the economy by reminding members and potential members of all the free services offered. How might we ... remind the public about something they already know (free library services) that sounds un-impressive? We could I started going to the library first because I was on a budget. – KR, member We offer unlimited free computer access to everyone. Our competitors can’t say that... We used to purchase all the New York Times best sellers, before they became politicized. – SL, staff * the library was built when 39 citizens raised $3000, with a matching contribution of $3000 by a wealthy donor in 1906. ... create a local campaign that looks impressive, with overly-ornate design around simple library objects. ... stay competitive in the age of free services: Google, Yahoo, Spotify, YouTube, Facebook? ... emphasize our programs and classes: free, hands-on, with human/human/computer interaction. ... appear better than the competing services: Fedex Office, RedBox, Barnes & Noble? ... advertise our “help” means more than one resource: from classes taught by experts to budgeting books on tape.
  • 58. Mark Guarraia Insight one The Next Chapter Synthesis Document People are turning to their libraries for free community resources and programs– much of this traffic driven by economic factors. 54 The kids and I will always come for reading hour with the children’s librarian because it keeps the kids occupied, we can walk to it from our house, and it’s FREE – with my husband currently out of work, everything helps. – Angela, 32 There is an opportunity to make the community library the go-to destination for community learning, resources, and education – and to increase its current member base. How might we … more effectively communicate the services offered by the community library? We could ... contextually marketing and advertising of programs ... publicity – variety of channels, public and private … pull in community members who are currently on the periphery? ... host a signature neighborhood event annually, showcasing the other events offered to the community … continue to fund these initiatives? ... partner with other businesses / entities (for instance, drama department at Brown University to draw people to auditorium space) … continue to anticipate the needs of our community?
  • 59. Mark Guarraia The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Insight two 55 The community is craving things the library can’t currently offer enough of, due to staff and resourcing constraints. The library does, however, know and can anticipate the needs of its community. When designing the new library in Tiverton, we followed the San Jose model – which places all librarians on the floor, ‘ freeing’ them from the front desk so that they can assist and interact with members. – Stephanie, 31 There is an opportunity to increase funding and accessibility to value-added offerings and programs, with knowledge of the community being served. How might we We could … capture the needs of our community members? ... create a fundraising initiative specific to certain valueadded offerings and programs. … increase the library’s ability to offer relevant and useful programming to its members? ... encourage neighborhood corporate sponsorship of certain activities / courses / concert series / events … account for staff and resourcing constraints when expanding program offerings? ... host a bi-annual forum to understand what the community is craving. … increase programming at the community library? ... gather field suggestions from members, neighbors, and neighborhood businesses.
  • 60. Mark Guarraia Insight three The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Community members are utilizing the library grounds and interior quiet space as much as they are utilizing programs and resources. 56 As a family, we’ll go have a picnic on the library yard – especially during the summer. Even when they offer concerts, we’ll hang out until they start. We just don’t have that amount of space at our house. – Matt, 40 There is an opportunity to promote the physical environment of the public library as much as the shared resources. How might we We could … make people aware of the physical spaces available for use at the community library? ... make many of the cherished spaces within the library rentable for private functions – weddings, dinners, meetings, parties. Many of these events happen during ‘off hours’ anyway. … better preserve the physical spaces – historically, physically, and financially? ... continue library programming outdoors – bring the library OUT of the library’s walls. … leverage the physical environment of the library better? ... host a community picnic day on the lawn ... provide architectural tours of the library, grounds, and neighborhood
  • 61. Mark Guarraia Insight four The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Groups attending the library on a consistent basis are not communicating or interacting with each other. 57 ‘We do like meeting the other parents at the library, but other than that, we tend to stick to ourselves – not sure what everyone else is there for.’ – Faith, 42 There is an opportunity to connect disparate groups of people who are currently attending and utilizing the community library. How might we … connect different users within the library? … create amenities multiple groups of users may enjoy? … showcase the library as a meeting place for different user groups? We could ... create a member-based resource board – what can members teach each other? ... allow library members to run programs, free up library staff. ... offer library stations throughout – for instance, multiple smaller computer stations as opposed to just one. ... develop classes that only happen in meeting rooms can have components which happen in the main hall. ... offer programs outside of the library space – extend into neighborhood.
  • 62. Group 2 The Next Chapter Synthesis Document th er e’s an op po rtun ity... 58 ... for members with met needs to develop collaborative services/programs that can be communicated to the community as a value benefit of the library. ... to increase the notion of the library as a recreational space of connectivity, changing the perceived value of the library. ... to showcase the wide variety of library resources visually to the community by partnering with community member frequented establishments. ... to make the community library the go-to destination for community learning, resources, and education – and to increase its current member base. r a rm te er lo ng desi gn solu ti on s Increase member satisfaction, and bring in potential users on the periphery Allow users to move about the space by offering digital mobility. This is the comfort of home. X X Develop a visual and directional display of library spaces & resources that are simple for the user to comprehend. X Digital Artifacts #1 ideal sorting image – the online library X X Ensure that the service desk is fully automated, freeing librarians from routine tasks. X ... to connect disparate groups of people who are currently attending and utilizing the community library. Develop a visual & digital based platform that can be accessed both internally/externally to browse resources by keyword. X ... to increase funding and accessibility to value-added offerings and programs, with knowledge of the community being served. ... to grow the children’s programs by focusing on the mothers’ criteria as opposed to the library’s creative desires. ye le tb en em pl Im Im pl em en tb le th is ‘to m or ro w ’ Opportunity Map Educate librarians of marketing ideas to evolve communication. Enable with software. Recruit library volunteers using existing members as a resource. Could include youth program “little librarians” to develop emotional tie to library.
  • 63. Group 2 le rm tb te en er em lo ng pl Im Im pl em en tb le th is ‘to m ye a r or ro w ’ Opportunity Map desi gn solu ti on s th er e’s an op po rtun ity... The Next Chapter Synthesis Document .. to create an implement evolving system of user nee s eyon uant tat ve stat st cs. 59 .. to ensure t at tec nolog use li rarians is most current an useful for t eir nee s. . q . by d d b d i i i i .. to present i rarians as figures of t e communit . e are often quite assionate a outyt e d communit t e serve, quite knowle gea le a out h h namic perspectives of communit mem ers. b rea istor an aware of d h d . p a . th . l b . o h Lb h y Th y .. to promote t e p ysical environment of t e pu lic li rary as muc as b h y h y d b b e sy are resources. h d dy y b h make th h rar t be b go-to h estination .. to e communit li for communit d earning, resources, an e ucation – an to increase its current mem er ase.h y b y h d y h d d d b .. to ran t e local li rarian as t e source of personalize knowle ge, br t dehcon uit to all answers. b h d d d Elevate the library and librarians as expert and unparalleled resources, through communication, technology, and marketing X E th c h b ost an outdoor event positive visual displa based on social and ecreational interaction, coinci e t e event wit an internal fun raising d h v n. h evelop a communit istor ongoing program t at is interactive an orks to d esta lis new fin ings wit ever meeting. Displa progress roug various platforms of communication, inclu ing igital social ia. d p H r e e t d y i l ( d D w th h med yh h y) h X y b h d h y y d X H e I c i X h ii ’ ngage in a community event, esign a volunteer participation exercise at s owcases t e outcome of communit colla oration towar s t e ommun t es future otent a . hb h d h X d y y h h y d d h U y d ost a signature neig or oo event annuall , s owcasing t e ot er vents offere to t e communit h h ncrease programming t at is going well, per aps involve sponsors / ommunit partners. Partner with other businesses / entities (for nstance, rama epartment at Brown niversit to raw people to d
  • 64. Group 2 . p . p b h h ..bto make t e community li rary t e go-to estination for community y by y d h y y earning,by d d resources, an e ucation – an to increase its current mem er y b ase. h b d d h d d b .. to increase fun ing an accessi ilit to value-a e offerings an rograms, wit knowle ge of t e community eing serve . d h d d b y h dd d b d d .. to capitalize on t e state of t e econom remin ing mem ers an otential mem ers of all t e free services offere . d h h y by d b b h d ye a rm te er lo desi gn solu ti on s .. for li raries to ecome t e location for a large population of t e ommunit marr ing services an spaces so t at activit is visuall cknowle ge all communit mem ers. . l b ng em pl Im th er e’s an op po rtun it y... . c a is le en tb le tb Im pl em en The Next Chapter Synthesis Document 60 th ‘to m or ro r w ’ Opportunity Map Leverage current library assets, and promote further to existing and future member populations X This should be about capturing what the community needs (perhaps charette), and what is already going well, and turning that into a full calendar of meaningful events. Again, perhaps community partnership plays into this heavily? X Require digital artifacts users in the library space (desktop, mobile, etc.) to state activity or need being pursued through library. Use data to identify need, constantly evolving libraries’ relationship with technology. Vocalize leading edge user technology. X Develop “sister” library relationship within county scope. Offer insight as to what the focus is of each library (ie – reference, history, social groups, fiction readers, youth activity) and establish a program to educate
  • 65. Group 2 th is le rm tb lo Im ng pl er em te en Im pl em en tb le ‘ to m or ye a ro r w ’ Opportunity Map desi gn solu ti on s The Next Chapter Synthesis Document th er e’s an op po rtun ity... 61 .. to communicate t e financial nee of t e li rar more effectivel to t e nt re commun t . . e i . f .. to generate fun s leveraging mem er onate artifacts for un raising campaigns on items t at are not only li rary centric. h d iy .. to furt er esta lis . . p . th . add b y y h out mem er atten ance. d by d h b d d b h .. to increase fun ing an accessi ilit to value-a e offerings an rograms, wity knowle ge ofdt e community eing serve . h b h h b d b dd d .. to promote t d p sicalyenvironment of t e pud lic li rar as muc as e h d h b d e s are resources. h h .. hy h b b y h d to allow ot er Patrons to join un er t e fun raising anner, generating itional support an d h camara d erie. b h d d Increase the stability and security of the community library to increase their community oten tial de ig n id ea : ake man of t e c eris e spaces wit in t e li rar renta le for private unctions – we ings, inners, meetings, parties. Man of t ese events appen uring ‘off ours’ an wa X p s M f h s h Xdd y d h h d h h b d h y y. N c hb h D b h c s y d h i h b X b y b h d y initiative specific to certain value-added offerings eig or oo corporate sponsors ip of certain activities / courses / oncert ser es / events X C a d reateba fundraising y h n y programs. h d y C h evelop out clu ongoing programs ase on tren topics t at can e interesting for a wider audience. Ex: Create a outh talent club and d h ost a famil event to showcase local talent. Ex: reate a stor book / omic ook c aracter para e t at participates in oli ay para es or a y imple Saturda parade to attract attention. d d
  • 66. Group 2 Opportunities The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Increase member satisfaction and bring in users on the periphery 62 Elevate the library and librarians as experts and unparalleled resources, through community, technology, and marketing Leverage current library assets and promote further external reach to existing and future member populations Increase the financial stability and security of the community library to increase its community offerings
  • 67. Group 2 potential Design ideas Increase member satisfaction and bring in users on the periphery The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Elevate the library and librarians as experts and unparalleled resources, through community, technology, and marketing 63 Leverage current library assets and promote further external reach to existing and future member populations Automate all or part of the service desk, allowing librarians to interface with patrons outside of the desk Increase the financial stability and security of the Develop a visual and directional Create an environment more community library to increase its community offerings conducive to ‘lounging’ and relaxing – more of a book store setting display of library spaces and resources that is easy to understand and access Allow users to move about the space by offering digital mobility – offering them the convenience and comfort of home
  • 68. Group 2 Increase member satisfaction and bring in users on the periphery potential Design ideas Elevate the library and librarians as experts and unparalleled resources, through community, technology, and marketing The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Leverage current library assets and promote further external reach to existing and future member populations 64 Increase the financial stability and security of the community library to increase its community offerings Host signature neighborhood events annually, showcasing the other events offered to the community Increase programming that is going well, and involve community partners that can help promote them Recruit library volunteers using existing members as a resource. Could include youth program ‘little librarians’ to develop emotional tie to library Develop a living ‘community history’ platform that is both by and for the community – dispersed through various communication platforms, including social media
  • 69. Elevate the library and librarians as experts and unparalleled potential Design ideas resources, through community, technology, and marketing Group 2 Leverage current library assets and promote further external reach to existing and future member populations The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Increase the financial stability and security of the community library to increase its community offerings 65 Host a charrette to find out what the community needs and what is already going well, and turn that into a full calendar of meaningful community events Glean information from digital artifacts users in the library space about their needs to better identify upcoming needs and desires of the community Develop ‘sister’ library relationships within counties. Offer insight as to what the focus is of each library (reference, history, social groups, etc.) and establish corresponding educational programs Provide community events with a broader demographic reach within the library’s physical environments
  • 70. Leverage current library assets and promote further external reach to potential Design ideas existing and future member populations Group 2 The Next Chapter Synthesis Document Increase the financial stability and security of the community library to increase its community offerings 66 Make many of the cherished spaces within the library rentable for private functions – weddings, dinners, meetings, parties, as many of these events happen during ‘off hours’ Create a fundraising initiative specific to certain value-added offerings and programs Involve neighborhood corporate sponsors for certain activities / events / educational courses / concert series Develop ongoing youth club programs based on trend topics that can be interesting for a wider audience. For instance – talent groups, groups that interface with neighborhood events / parades
  • 71. The Next Chapter Synthesis Document the next chapter appendix 67
  • 72. The Next Chapter Appendix Group 2 Field notes 68
  • 73. The Next Chapter Appendix Group 2 Field notes 69
  • 74. The Next Chapter Appendix Group 2 field notes 70
  • 75. The Next Chapter Appendix Group 2 field notes 71
  • 76. The Next Chapter Appendix Group 2 Field notes 72
  • 77. Group 2 works cited American Library Association. http://www.ala.org Coonan, Emma Marya. “Information-seeking behavior in a major research library: User’ search strategies for navigating the OPAC”. Spetember 2008. Dowling, Micheal. “American Library Association announces collaboration with Sharjah International Book fair”. http://www.ala.org “Friends of the Lewisville Library”, Lewisville Branch Events & News. “Public Libraries in the United States Survey: Fiscal Year 2010.” Institute of Museum and Library Services. http://www.imls.gov/research/public_libraries_in_the_us_fy_2010_report.aspx Sewers, Paul. “The future of libraries”. August 22,2013, http://thenextweb.com/insider/2013/08/22 “Teens need libraries”. YALSA. http://www.ala.org http:www.forsythcounty.cc/library/Lewisville Tiverton Public Library. http://www.tivertonlibrary.org/ Gunter J., Wabe. “Library, Archive and Museum collaboration”. OCLC Research. “Trends in Library Usage.” Wikipedia. Hall, James. “Mobile Library cuts to hit elderly and rural dwellers”. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/9189385 “Ideas and Models for offering programs”, Idea Serving. The Next Chapter Appendix http://www.ala.org/ascla/asclaissues/101 73 Maitland Public Library. http://www.maitlandpubliclibrary.org/ “Meeting Rooms”. Lewisville Branch Events & News, Info. http:www.forsythcounty.cc/library/Lewisville “News you can use about the central library”. Forsyth County Library, NC. Price, Gary. “New Statistics Available: IMLS Releases New ‘Public Library Report’”. Info Docket Library Journal. http://www.infodocket.com/2013/01/22/new- statistics-available-imls-releases-new-public-library-report-fy-2010/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trends_in_library_usage Valdes, Manuel. “US libraries tst new service for streaming movies, music.” Oct.2,2013, http://ctvnews.ca/si-tech/u=s=libraries White, Jacquelyn, “North Carolina Digital Library”, October 17,2013 http://www.forsythcounty.cc/library/Lewisville William Hall Public Library. http://www.cranstonlibrary.org/locations/hall Young Adult Library Services, “Speaking up for Library Services to Teens.”, The Campaign for America’s Libraries.