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  • 1. CAGAYAN VALLEY REGION 2
  • 2. CAGAYAN VALLEY(FILIPINO:LAMBAK NG CAGAYAN,IBANAG:TANA’NAK CAGAYAN,ILOKANO:TANAPTI CAGAYAN,ITAWIS:TANAPYO CAGAYAN,MALAUEG:GA-DANGYO CAGAYAN)
  • 3. Geography Cagayan Valley is the large mass of land in the northeastern region of Luzon, comprising today the provinces of Cagayan, Isabela, Nueva Vizcayaand Quirino. It is bounded to the west by the Cordillera Mountain Range, to the east by the Sierra Madre Mountain Range, and bounded by theBabuyan Island, where the waters of the Pacific Ocean in the east and the South China Sea in the west meet. Cagayan Valley, contains two landlocked provinces, Quirino and Nueva Vizcaya. Both are relatively small in size (3057 km2 for Quirino, 4081 km2for Nueva Vizcaya) and population (147,000 and 365,000, respectively, by the 2000 census). They are ruggedly mountainous and heavily forested. Nueva Vizcaya is the remnant of the southern province created when Cagayan Province was divided in two in 1839. They are ethnically and linguistically diverse, with a substrate of Agtas, Negritos who are food- gatherers with no fixed abodes, overlaid by Ilongots and others in a number of tribes, some of whom were fierce head-hunters (they have given up the practice), with the latest but largest element of the population being Ilokano. Nueva Vizcaya comprises 15 towns; Bayombong is the capital. Agriculture in both has until recently consisted of slash-and-burn cultivation of corn and maize, though more stable cultivation of vegetables and fruits are becoming established. They produce logs and are trying to manage their forest resources so that production can be sustained indefinitely. They have deposits of gold, silver, copper, iron. Nueva Vizcaya has sand and clay.
  • 4. History Archaeology indicates that the Cagayan Valley has been inhabited for half a million years, though no human remains of any such antiquity have yet appeared. The earliest inhabitants are the Agta, or Atta, food-gatherers who roam the forests without fixed abodes. A large tract of land has lately been returned to them. The bulk of the population is of Malay origin. For centuries before the coming of the Spanish, the inhabitants traded with Indians, Malays, Chinese, and Japanese. In the nineteenth century the prosperity found in tobacco cultivation caused many Ilokano to settle here. Tobacco is still a major factor in the economy of Cagayan, though a special economic zone and free port has been created to strengthen and diversify the provincial economy. During Spanish times Cagayan Valley had a larger territory than what it has today. It included the territories of the above-mentioned provinces and the eastern parts of the Cordillera provinces ofApayao, Kalinga, Ifugao and Benguet. As the historian and missionary Jose Burgues, said, "The old Cagayan Valley comprises the province of Cagayan, Isabela and Nueva Vizcaya as well as the military Districts of Apayao, Itaves, Quiangan, Cayapa and Bintangan, plus the area of the Sierra Madre to the Pacific Ocean in the said trajectory." At Balete Pass in Nueva Vizcaya the retreating Japanese under General Tomoyuki Yamashita dug in and held on for three months against the American and Filipino forces who eventually drove them out; the pass is now called Dalton Pass in honor of General Dalton, USA, who was killed in the fighting.
  • 5. Economy The province of Isabela is the richest in Cagayan Valley. It was the Top 10 Richest Province in the Philippines in 2011, being the only province of Northern Luzon to be included in the list.[4] Cagayan has much to offer visitors: beaches, swimming, snorkeling, skin- diving, fishing in the river and the sea, hiking in primeval forest, mountain- climbing, archaeological sites, the remarkable collection of the provincial museum, the Callao Caves, and many fine churches. Even here there are fortifications built to protect the inhabitants from raids by the Mara. The Cagayan Economic Zone Authority (CEZA) is in Santa Ana, Cagayan. Tilapia capital of the Philippines On January 11, 2008, the Cagayan Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) stated that tilapia (species of cichlid fishes from the tilapiine cichlid tribe) production grew and Cagayan Valley is now the Philippines’ tilapia capital (Saint Peter’s fish). Production supply grew 37.25% since 2003, with 14,000 metric tons (MT) in 2007. The recent aquaculture congress found that the growth of tilapia production was due to government interventions: provision of fast- growing species, accreditation of private hatcheries to ensure supply of quality fingerlings, establishment of demonstration farms, providing free fingerlings to newly constructed fishponds, and the dissemination of tilapia to Nueva Vizcaya (in Diadi town).
  • 6. Province/City Capital Population (2010)[7] Area (km²) Pop. density (per km²) Batanes Basco 16,604 209.3 79.3 Cagayan Tuguegarao City 1,124,773 9,002.0 124.9 Isabela Ilagan City 1,489,645 10,409.6 143.1 Nueva Vizcaya Bayombong 421,355 3,903.9 107.9 Quirino Cabarroguis 176,786 3,057.2 57.8 Santiago City — 132,804 275.00 480 Region II is composed of five provinces, one independent city, three component cities, 89 municipalities, and 2,311 barangays.
  • 7. Batanes
  • 8. The Province of Batanes (Ivatan: Probinsya nu Batanes, Filipino: Lalawigan ng Batanes) is an island province in the region of Cagayan Valley. Its comprising ten islands that are located in the Luzon Strait between the islands of Luzon and Taiwan. It is the northernmost province of the Philippines and is also the smallest province, both in terms of population and land area.island group is located about 162 km north of Luzon and about 190 kilometers south of Taiwan, separated from the Babuyan Islands of Cagayan Province, Luzon, by the Balintang Channel and from Taiwan by the Bashi Channel. The provincial capital is Basco on Batan Island and the only other inhabited islands are Itbayat and Sabtang. The northernmost island of the province, making it the northernmost island in the Philippines, is Mavudis (Y'ami) Island. Other islands in the chain are Misanga, Siayan, Ivuhos, and Dequey.[1] The islands are part of the Luzon Volcanic Arc.
  • 9. History The ancestors of today's Ivatans are descended from Austronesians who migrated to the islands 4000 years ago during the Neolithic period. They lived in fortified mountain areas called idjangs and drank sugar-cane wine, or palek. They also used gold as currency and produced a thriving agriculture-based industry. They were also seafarers and boat-builders. In 1687, a crew of English freebooters headed by William Dampier came with a Dutch crew and named the islands in honour of their country's nobility. Itbayat was named "Orange Isle" after William of Orange, and Batan was named "Grafton Isle" after Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton. Sabtang Isle was named "Monmouth Isle" after James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth. Capt. Dampier stayed for less than three months, and did not claim the islands for the British crown. Toward the end of the Spanish regime, Batanes was made a part of Cagayan. In 1909, however, the American authorities organized it into an independent province. Because of its strategic location, the islands was one of the first points occupied by the invading Japanese imperial forces at the outbreak of the Pacific War. During the American colonial period, public schools suddenly boomed, and more Ivatan became more aware of their place in the Philippines. One of the first School Superintendents was Victor de Padua, an Ilocano, who in 1942-45 during the Japanese occupation was made Provincial Governor. In 1920, the first wireless telegraph was installed, followed by an airfield in 1930. Roads were constructed and the Batanes High School was instituted. In the morning of December 8, 1941, the Batan Task Force from Taiwan landed on the Batan Islands, the first American territory occupied by the Japanese. Japanese fighters from these islands took part in the raid on Clark Air Base later that same day. During the Second World War, the Japanese army committed atrocities against the Ivatan. When the United States regained the country, Batanes regained its provincehood.
  • 10. People and culture An Ivatan woman
  • 11. The people of Batanes are called Ivatan and share prehistoric cultural and linguistic commonalities with the Babuyan on Babuyan Island and the Tao people of Orchid Island. This divided homeland is a result of the Dutch invasion of Taiwan in 1624 (Dutch Formosa) and Spanish invasion in 1626 (Spanish Formosa). The northern half of the Ivatan homeland, Formosa and Orchid Island which were formally part of the Viceroyalty of New Spain, fell to the Dutch who were in turn expelled in 1662 by forces of the Chinese Ming Dynasty, led by the Chinese pirate Koxinga who then set himself up as The King of Taiwan. The southern half of the Ivatan homeland, the islands of the Batanes, was reinforced and fortified by Spanish refugees from Formosa before being formally joined in the 18th century with the Spanish government in Manila. The main languages spoken in Batanes are Ivatan, which is spoken on the islands of Batan and Sabtang, and Itbayaten, which is spoken primarily on the island of Itbayat. The Ivatan which is dominant in the province is considered to be one of the Austronesian languages. From college level down to elementary level, the language is widely spoken.[5] Municipalities •Basco •Itbayat •Ivana •Mahatao •Sabtang •Uyugan
  • 12. Geography Topography Batanes on a map of the Luzon Strait
  • 13. The islands are the northernmost islands of the Philippines. They are located between the Babuyan Islands (belonging to Cagayan Province) and Taiwan. The islands are sparsely populated and subject to frequent typhoons. The three largest islands are Itbayat, Batan, and Sabtang. The northernmost is Mavudis Island. Almost one-half of Batanes are hills and mountains. Batan Island, with a land area of 35 km², is generally mountainous on the north and southeast. It has a basin in the interior. Itbayat Island, which has a total area of 95 km², slopes gradually to the west, being mountainous and hilly along its northern, eastern coast. As for Sabtang, mountains cover the central part of its 41 km² area, making the island slope outward to the coast. The islands are situated between the vast expanse of the waters of Bashi Channel and Balintang Channel, where the Pacific Ocean, merges with the China Sea. The area is a sealane between the Philippines and Japan, China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. It is rich with marine resources, including the rarest sea corals in the world[which?]. The province is hilly and mountainous, with only 1,631.50 hectares or 7.10% of its area level to undulating and 78.20% or 17,994.40 hectares varying in terms from rolling to steep and very steep. Forty two percent (42%) or 9,734.40 hectares are steep to very steep land. Because of the terrain of the province, drainage is good and prolonged flooding is non-existent. The main island of Batan has the largest share of level and nearly level lands, followed by Itbayat and Sabtang, respectively. Itbayat has gently rolling hills and nearly level areas on semi-plateaus surrounded by continuous massive cliffs rising from 20–70 meters above sea level, with no shorelines. Sabtang on the other hand, has its small flat areas spread sporadically on its coasts, while its interior is dominated by steep mountains and deep canyons. Batan Island and Sabtang have intermittent stretches of sandy beaches and rocky shorelines.[citation needed] The terrain of the province while picturesque at almost every turn, has limited the potential for expansion of agriculture in an already very small province.
  • 14. Ecology An extensive survey of the ecology of Batanes[6] provided the scientific basis for confirming the need for a national park in Batanes protecting the Batanes protected landscapes and seascapes, proposed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, submitted on 15 August 1993.[7]
  • 15. Economy About 75% of the Ivatans are farmers and fishermen. The rest are employed in the government and services sector. Garlic and cattle are major cash crops. Ivatans also plant camote (sweet potato), cassava, gabi or tuber and a unique variety of white uvi. Sugarcane is raised to produce palek, a kind of native wine, and vinegar. In recent years, fish catch has declined due to the absence of technical know-how. Employment opportunities are scarce. Most of the educated Ivatans have migrated to urban centers or have gone abroad. A wind diesel generating plant was commissioned in 2004. Distance and bad weather work against its economic growth. Certain commodities like rice, soft drinks, and gasoline carry a 75% to 100% mark-up over Manila retail prices.
  • 16. Natural Resources Batanes Hills
  • 17. A Rocky Shore in Batanes (Valuga Beach)
  • 18. White sand beach at Sabtang island
  • 19. Cagayan
  • 20. Cagayan (Ilokano: Probinsya ti Cagayan; Tagalog: Lalawigan ng Cagayan), is a province of the Philippines in the Cagayan Valley Region in the northeast of Luzon Island, and includes the Babuyan Islands to the north. The province borders Ilocos Norte and Apayao to the west, and Kalinga and Isabela to the south. The capital of Cagayan is Tuguegarao City. Cagayan Province is distinct from the city of Cagayan de Oro in Mindanao, Cagayancillo in Palawan, and the island of Cagayan de Tawi-Tawi in the Sulu Sea.
  • 21. History In 1581, Captain Juan Pablo Carreon arrived in Cagayan with a hundred fully equipped soldiers and their families by order of Gonzalo Ronquillo de Peñaloza, the fourth Spanish Governor- General of the Philippines. the expeditionary force was sent to explore the Cagayan Valley, to forcibly convert the natives to Catholicism, and to establish ecclesiastical missions and towns throughout the valley. On 29 June 1583, Juan de Salcedo traced the northern coastline of Luzon and set foot on the Massi (Pamplona), Tular, and Aparri areas. The Spanish friars soon established mission posts in Camalaniugan and Lal-lo (Nueva Segovia), which became the seat of the Diocese established by Pope Clement VIII on August 14, 1595. The Spanish influence can still be seen in the massive churches and other buildings that the Spaniards built for the spiritual and social welfare of the people.
  • 22. Geography The province is bounded by the Pacific Ocean on the east; on the south by Isabela province; on the west by the Cordillera Mountains; and on the north by the Balintang Channel and the Babuyan Group of Islands. About two kilometers from the northeastern tip of the province is the island of Palaui; a few kilometers to the west is Fuga Island. The Babuyan Group of Islands, which includes Calayan, Dalupiri, Camiguin, and Babuyan Claro, is about 60 nautical miles (110 km) north of Luzon mainland. The province comprises an aggregate land area of 9,002.70 square kilometers, which constitutes three percent of the total land area of the country, making it the second largest province in the region. Cagayan has 28 municipalities and one city divided into three congressional districts. It has 820 barangays. Tuguegarao City (as of December 18, 1999) is the provincial capital, regional seat, and center of business, trade, and education. It has a land area of 144.80 square kilometers and a population of 120,645 as of 2000.
  • 23. Demographics The majority of people living in Cagayan are of Ilocano descent, mostly from migrants coming from the Ilocos Region. Originally, the more numerous group were the Ibanags, who were first sighted by the Spanish explorers and converted to Christianity by missionaries. This is why the Ibanag language spread throughout the area prior to the arrival of Ilocanos.
  • 24. Economy Agricultural products are rice, corn, peanut, beans, and fruits. Livestock products include cattle, hogs, carabaos, and poultry. Fishing various species of fish from the coastal towns is also undertaken. Woodcraft furniture made of hardwood, rattan, bamboo, and other indigenous materials are also available in the province. The Northern Cagayan International Airport is a planned airport in Lal-lo, Cagayan. The airport will be built to support the Cagayan Special Economic Zone in northern Cagayan, which also serves seaborne traffic through Port Irene. The airport project will involve the construction of a 2,200-meter runway, with a width of 45 meters, following the standards of the International Civil Aviation Organization. Once completed, the planned international airport can accommodate large aircraft such as the Airbus A319-100 and Boeing regional jets of comparable size.[2] SM City Aparri will soon be built once the towns of Aparri, Santa Ana and Lal-lo attained its cityhood.
  • 25. Basilica of Our Lady of Piat in Piat, Cagayan
  • 26. Isabela (province)
  • 27. The Province of Isabela (Ilokano: Probinsya ti Isabela, Filipino: Lalawigan ng Isabela)), is province of the Philippines and the second largest province in the country next to Palawan. It is located in the Cagayan Valley Region in Luzon. Its capital is Ilagan and borders, clockwise from the south, Aurora, Quirino, Nueva Vizcaya, Ifugao, Mountain Province, Kalinga, and Cagayan. This primarily agricultural province is the rice and corn granary of Luzon due to its plain and rolling terrain. In 2012, the province was declared as country's top producer in corn with 1,209,524 production.[1] It is the Top 10 richest province in the Philippines last 2011, being the only province of Northern Luzon to be included in the list. The province has four trade centers in the cities of Ilagan, Cauayan, Santiago and the municipality of Roxas.
  • 28. History Prior to 1856, there were only two provinces in the Cagayan Valley: Cagayan and Nueva Vizcaya. The Province of Cagayan at that time consisted of all towns from Tumauini to the north in Aparri and all other towns from Ilagan City, Roxas southward to Aritao comprised the Province of old Nueva Vizcaya. In order to facilitate the work of the Catholic missionaries in the evangelization in the Cagayan Valley, a royal decree was issued on May 1, 1856 that created the Province of Isabela consisting of the towns of Gamu, Old Angadanan (now Alicia), Bindang (now Roxas) and Camarag (now Echague), Carig (now Santiago City) and Palanan, all detached from Nueva Vizcaya; while Cabagan and Tumauini were taken from the Cagayan province. The province was put under the jurisdiction of a governor with the capital seat at Ilagan City, where it remains at the present. It was initially called Isabela de Luzon to differentiate from other places in the Philippines bearing the name of Isabela. The new province was named in honor of Queen Isabella II of Spain.[2]
  • 29. People and culture According to the latest Philippine Census, Isabela is the most populated province among the five provinces in Cagayan Valley (Region II). It has a population of 1,401,495 people and comprising 45.93 percent of the 3 million people in the region. At the national level, the province contributed 1.58 percent to the total population of 88.57 million. There are 254,928 households in the province. For all ages, the sex ratio in Isabela was about 105 with 660,627 males and 626,948 females in the 2000 Census of Population and Housing (Census 2000). There are more males than females below 50 years old. Ilokano are the most prominent group in Isabela. Of the total household population, 68.71 percent classified themselves as Ilokanos. The next two prominent groups(ethnic) are Ibanag (14.05 percent) and Tagalog (10.02 percent). The remaining 7.22 percent are either Gaddang, Paranan, Yogad, or are from other ethnic groups. Major languages in Isabela are Ilokano followed by Ibanag, Yogad, Gaddang. People especially in the capital and commercial centers speak and understand English and Tagalog/Pilipino.
  • 30. Geography Isabela comprises an aggregate land area of 10,665 square kilometers, representing almost 40 percent of the regional territory. It is the largest province in the island of Luzon and the second largest province in the Philippines in terms of land area. It is located on the right-most part of the Northern Luzon facing the Pacific Ocean and comprising parts of the Sierra Madre. Isabela is one of the provinces which is often hit by typhoons due to its location.
  • 31. Physical The province is divided into three physiographic areas. The eastern area, straddled by the Sierra Madre mountain range, is rugged and thickly forested. A substantial portion is uncharted. These unexplored hinterlands are home to a rich variety of flora and fauna, while others are government reservations. The western area is a sprawling fertile valley hemmed by the Central Cordillera. It is criss-crossed by the mighty Cagayan River, Siffu river, and Magat River. Its mountains rise to a peak of about 8,000 feet, and are home to one of the world’s largest remaining low-altitude rainforests, with numerous unknown endemic species of flora and fauna and exceptional biological diversity. The area is popularly known as the Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park. Isabela has 600,000 hectares of Cagayan Valley’s 900,000 hectares of forest cover.
  • 32. Isabela is subdivided into 34 municipalities and three (3) cities. Political map of Isabela, Philippines
  • 33. City Income Class District Population (2010) Area (km²) Barangays Cauayan City1 3rd class component city 3rd 122,335 336.40 65 Ilagan City2 3rd class component city 1st 135,174 1,166.26 91 Santiago City3 1st class, independent component city 4th 132,804 275.00 37 Cities
  • 34. Economy and tourism Tourism is relatively a new industry being developed in the province. Support services and accommodation facilities are likewise being developed. Tourism focuses mainly in the three cities of Santiago, Cauayan and Ilagan and its surrounding area with the Presence of Magat Dam tourism complex and places of interest. Tourism is also being developed in the coastal areas of Palanan where white sand beaches can be found. The province of Isabela is the richest in Cagayan Valley. It is also the Top 10 Richest Province in the Philippines last 2011, being the only province of Northern Luzon to be included in the list.
  • 35. Agriculture Agriculture is the major industry of the people of Isabela. Farming is highly mechanized as most of the agricultural lands are irrigated. With the presence of the Isabela State University, joint ventures and other foreign assisted projects and the Magat Dam contribute to the high productivity in agriculture. It is also the hub of trade and commerce and other economic activities due to its central location in the region. The wood industry used to be a top earner for the province but due to the logging ban imposed in the Cagayan Valley Region, activities in this industry considerably declined. However, furniture making using narra[disambiguation needed ] and other indigenous forest materials continue to exist.
  • 36. Forestland Forestland covers 54.37% or 579,819 hectares of Isabela's total land area of which 62% is protection forest and 38% is production forest. The best quality of timber resources in the Philippines is found in Isabela's forest. Isabela's vast forest resources are now being ecologically manage to effect sustainable forest- based resource not only for the wood working industry but to secure a balanced ecosystem.
  • 37. Fisheries Isabela's coast in Divilacan
  • 38. Potential investments are in fisheries and tourism. Isabela has a fertile fishing ground on the Pacific Coast. The reservoir of the Magat Dam is utilized for fish cage operations for tilapia production for domestic markets. Tourism is relatively a new industry being developed in the province. Support services and accommodation facilities are likewise being developed.
  • 39. Mineral and Energy Also found in the province are large deposits of copper, gold, zinc & chromite, manganese and nickel. It has extensive deposits of non- metallic minerals such as limestone, clay, marbles, guano, sand & gravel, and boulders. Indigenous energy sources such as natural gas and hydroelectric capabilities have been found to be abundant in the valley. Many of its mineral reserves have yet to be fully tapped.
  • 40. Maconacon Falls (Maconacon, Isabela)
  • 41. Abuan River (Ilagan City)
  • 42. Nueva Vizcaya
  • 43. Etymology The name Nueva Vizcaya derives from the name given at the time to the western Basque territories of Spain, or less likely from the province of Biscay (called Vizcaya in Spanish) itself.
  • 44. History, People and Culture The province of Nueva Vizcaya used to be a territory of the vast Cagayan Valley which was once an integral political unit with one governor. In 1839, then-Governor Luis Lardizabal issued an order transforming Nueva Vizcaya into a politico-military province upon the advice of the alcalde mayor of Cagayan. The order was approved by a Royal Decree on April 10, 1841. The province had its first taste of civil governance in 1902 when it was organized by the Philippine Commission. The present territory of Nueva Vizcaya was the result of changes emanating from the formal creation of the province of Isabela in May 1865, wherein a great portion of its northern territory was ceded to the newly-born province. In 1908, the organization of the province of Ifugao further reduced the area of Nueva Vizcaya which was forced to give up its northwest territory. The survey executed by the Bureau of Lands in 1914 further caused the diminution of its area and reduced again upon the enactment of the Administrative Code of 1917.
  • 45. Geography The province has a total land area of 4,378.80 square kilometers, which accounts for 16.30% of the total land area of Region II. It is composed of 15 municipalities, with Bayombong as the provincial capital and major educational center, Bambang and Solano as the major commercial centers, and Kayapa as the summer capital and "vegetable bowl" of the province. Nueva Vizcaya lies approximately 268 kilometers north of Metro Manila and can be reached by land via the Cagayan Valley Road (Maharlika Highway). With forest land, agricultural areas and grasslands occupying a wide swath of the province, it does not come as a surprise that Nueva Vizcaya is an ideal site for extensive agricultural activity. Its main crops are rice, corn, vegetables, pineapple, banana, coffee, coconut, oranges and other fruit trees. The first time that an actual live photo of the worcester buttonquail was taken occurred in Nueva Vizcaya in early 2009. In mining, the province faces bright prospects. According to the Bureau of Mines and Geo-Sciences, deposits of metallic minerals which can be exploited are copper, gold, molybdenum and pyrite. Non- metallic deposits include red clay, white clay and limestone. Sand and gravel are the most abundant deposits in the province.
  • 46. Tilapia industry Tilapia, St Peter's Fish On January 11, 2008, the Cagayan Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) stated that tilapia (species of cichlid fishes from the tilapiine cichlid tribe) production grew and Cagayan Valley is now the Philippines’ tilapia capital (Saint Peter’s fish). Production supply grew 37.25% since 2003, with 14,000 metric tons (MT) in 2007.
  • 47. Quirino
  • 48. History Long before its formal creation as an independent province, Quirino was the forest region of the province of Nueva Vizcaya, inhabited by tribal groups known as the Negritos. They roamed the hinterlands and built their huts at the heart of the jungle. Quirino lies in the southeastern portion of Cagayan Valley. It is situated within the upper portion of the Cagayan River basin and bounded by Isabela on the north, Aurora on the east and southeast, and Nueva Vizcaya on the west and southwest. The Ilocano dialect is used widely in the lowlands of the province’s various municipalities while Ifugao is predominant in the uplands. Quirino province acquired its juridical personality as a result of the division of the provinces of Nueva Vizcaya and Isabela on June 18, 1966 under RA 4734. Quirino, named after the late president Elpidio Quirino, was created as a sub-province of Nueva Vizcaya in 1966. It became a full province in 1971.
  • 49. Demographics The population of the province as of the year 2010 census of population was 176,786[1] with a density of roughly 51 persons per square kilometer of land. The major language is Ilocano, which is widely spoken in the lowlands by 71.46 percent of the total populace. Ifugao is predominant in the uplands. Other languages are Bungkalot, Pangasinan, Kankana-ey, Tagalog, and English.
  • 50. Economy Agriculture is the main industry in Cagayan Valley, together with rice and corn as major crops. These supply the demand of neighboring provinces and the metropolis. Banana as well as banana chips are major products sold in Metro Manila and Pampanga. Small scale industries like furniture making, basketry, rattan craft, and dried flower production are prevalent.
  • 51. Quirino is subdivided into 6 municipalities. •Aglipay •Cabarroguis (capital) •Diffun •Maddela •Nagtipunan •Saguday
  • 52. Saging sa Quirino
  • 53. Quirino Province covers the upstream portion of the Cayagan River catchment area. It is bounded by mountains on the East (The sierra Madre) and South. The area is heavily forested. and Quirino State College is a center for forestry education and agribusiness research. It used to be part of Nueva Vizcaya, and currently is disputing which province “owns” Dipidia, a barangay with a newly-productive gold mine.
  • 54. One of the beautiful flowing rivers in Camp Vizcarra
  • 55. Chaos in the ricefields-santiago,isabela