UP LBL 880 - Session 1
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UP LBL 880 - Session 1 UP LBL 880 - Session 1 Presentation Transcript

  • MEd Module: Leadership and Management of Learning in Education LBL - Session 1 Presenter: Dr Muavia Gallie (PhD) 6 February 2010
  • Content 1. Introduction (10h00 - 10h15); 2. Homework reflection (10h20 - 11h20); 3. Teaching and Learning (11h25 - 13h25); 4. Administration, Management and Leadership (13h30 - 14h30); 5. New Tasks (14h35 - 14h50) 6. Conclusion (14h55 - 15h00)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1 Study Guide
  • 2. Homework Reflection
  • 2.1 Homework Task 1.1 • All our work is going to cover Knowledge, Skills and Dispositions, and we will attempt to connect Theory and Practice; • Therefore, you have to identify yourself a school (a case study) that you will work with; • If you are the principal or an SMT member of your school, you must get permission in writing from the SGB to use your school as a case study; • If you don’t or can’t use your own school, identify an accessible school, and get permission in writing from the SGB to use their school as a case study. • Please note that the school can remain anonymous, if they prefer it.
  • 2.2 Homework Task 1.2 & 1.3 1. Clearly define and explain the meaning of “Teaching” and “Learning”; 2. Define what the difference is between these two concepts; 3. Define the ‘inter-connectedness’ of these concepts, if any; and 4. Define which one comes first, if any. In all of the above, you should motivate your argument. Each of the above should be submitted on an A4 page. You will each be given 5 minutes during Session 1 (6 Feb) to present your arguments. 1. Clearly define and explain the meaning of “Leadership”, “Management”, and “Administration”; 2. Define what the difference is between these three concepts; 3. Define the ‘inter-connectedness’ of these concepts; and 4. Identify the logical order of these concepts, if any. In all of the above, you should motivate your argument. Each of the above should be explained on an A4 page. You will each be given 5 minutes during Session 1 (6 Feb) to present your arguments.
  • 3. Teaching and Learning
  • 3.1 Success rate = 8,1% •Success-rate of the system = 8,1% •Of every 12 learners starting Grade One, only 1 learner attains what the system is promising them - data 2005!
  • 3.2 Dysfunctionality vis-à-vis Under-performance Figure 10: Three levels of school functionality in relation to the support needed by schools 100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% -10% -20% Basics Non-Functioning Low-Functioning High-Functioning -20% – +20% 21% - 60% 61% - 100% Gallie 2006
  • 3.3 External and internal difference
  • 3.4 Activity 1 1. Participants must identify whether they are part of a: - Dysfunctional School; - Low functioning school; - High functioning school. Primary school participants must judge themselves based on the success of their ‘feeder school’.
  • 3.5 Defining Dysfunctional schools • Schools who continue to function, but do not accomplish the purpose for which they were created; • Schools exist to help each child realise his or her fullest potential as a human being; • Schools become dysfunctional when they stop serving the needs of the individuals with them; • School can take on a life of their own where their main objective becomes self-preservation; • One of the key indicators that a school has become dysfunctional is the ‘no talk rule’. Those within the school are not permitted, and do not permit themselves, to speak (or even think) critically about the school • Critical thinking begins with the question “why?” Why are we doing this? Why are things arranged this way? Why do we do it this way and not that way? These kinds of questions are not allowed in a dysfunctional group; • The other indicator is the evolution of a priestly caste whose allegiance is more strongly tied to the school than it is to the learners the school is meant to serve - this means the teachers and administrators within the school
  • 3.6 Activity 2 • Is your school Dysfunctional? • Ten critical questions for every school leader 1. Does every teacher teach everyday in every class for 196 school days in the year? [10] 2. Do you as school leader regularly observe teachers teaching in their classrooms? [10] 3. Do you spend at least 70% of your time in school on matters of teaching and learning? [10] 4. Do you regularly visit parents of learners in their homes? [10] 5. Is your school consistently clean, ordered and well-decorated in ways that convey positive sentiments about the learning environment? [10] 6. Do more than 95% of learners pass the highest grade in the school every year for the past five years? [10] 7. Do more than 98% of learners enrolled attend school everyday? [10] 8. Does every learner have a textbook in every subject? [10] 9. Does your school bring in at least R100,000 every year in external (private) funds e.g. the business community? [10] 10. In the case of High Schools, do at least 80% of your learners go on to university/university of technology? In the case of Primary Schools, do all your learners go on to high school? Prof. Jonathan Jansen (Executive Leadership Programme 2008)
  • 3.7 Functionality Score for your school 100 A Functional School 80 A Moderately Functional School 60 A Marginally functional School 40 A Seriously Dysfunctional School 20 A School?
  • 3.8 Video - Different Perspectives - 2 min Understanding the situation well
  • 3.9 - Ten Different mentalities 1. Definition of Teacher Quality; 2. Subject and/or learning area choices; 3. Time tabling; 4. Measuring productivity systems; 5. Quality Assurance systems; 6. Learner Expectation (success); 7. Data, Information, Knowledge, Intelligence Systems; 8. Multiple Opportunities; and 9. Time Utilisation; and 10.Difference between Home-work and School-work.
  • 3.9.1 Defining Teaching Quality • Three related schools of thought - Good teaching is defined by (a) what the teacher brings into the classroom - that is, TEACHER CHARACTERISTICS, (b) what teachers do while they are in the classroom - TEACHING PRACTICES, and © what learners take out of the classroom - LEARNERS LEARNING GAINS; • A. Focusing on TEACHER CHARACTERISTICS note that standards (e.g. obtaining a degree/diploma, passing a professional examination) are set to ensure a degree of quality. The logic here is that it is difficult to measure teaching quality directly, so indirect measures should be used; • B. Others argue for a more direct measure of what teachers actually do. Those who focus on TEACHING PRACTICE argue for five common pedagogical principles, namely: 1. Building on learners’prior knowledge; 2. Linking goals, assessment and instruction; 3. Teaching content and critical thinking; 4. Developing language skills; and 5. Creating a culture of learning; • C. There are those who reject measuring “inputs” (teacher characteristics) or “processes” (teaching practices) and argue that only outcomes matter. In this case, defining teaching quality is about HIGH LEARNER PERFORMANCE.
  • 3.9.2 Subject Choices Available No. Low-functioning School High-functioning School 1 Language 1st Language 1st 2 Language 2nd Language 2nd 3 Maths or Maths Lit Maths or Maths Lit 4 History or Science History 5 CAT or Accounting Science 6 Life Orientation CAT 7 Business Economics Accounting 8 Life Orientation 9 Business Economics
  • 3.9.3 Organising of Time table 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Mon 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 H I G H Tues 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 Wed 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 7 7 Thurs 1 2 3 4 4 5 5 6 6 L O W Fri
  • 3.9.4 Measuring Teaching Quality i.r.t. different school functionalities Non-Functioning Low Functioning High Functioning Schools (NFS) Schools (LFS) Schools (HFS) Performance Management and Reward Systems Evaluation and Appraisal Systems Supervisory and Accountability systems The Judgement of Quality is dependent on the Quality of the Judgement.
  • 3.9.5.1 Focus of the measuring tool .. Non-Functioning Low Functioning High Functioning Schools (NFS) Schools (LFS) Schools (HFS) Getting them Performance to perform Management and ‘optimally’ Reward Systems Getting them Evaluation and ‘to do Appraisal something Systems extra’ Getting them Supervisory and ‘to do their Accountability job’ systems
  • 3.9.5.2 Keeping their ‘eye’ on achieving … Non-Functioning Low Functioning High Functioning Schools (NFS) Schools (LFS) Schools (HFS) Getting the Performance OUTCOMES Management and right Reward Systems Getting the Evaluation and PROCESS Appraisal right Systems Getting the Supervisory and INPUT right Accountability systems
  • 3.9.6 In relation to Matric Results Figure 10: Three levels of school functionality in relation to the support needed by schools 100% 90% 80% Average (50%) in Matric Results 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% -10% -20% Non-Functioning Low-Functioning High-Functioning -20% – +20% 21% - 60% 61% - 100%
  • 3.9.7.1 Data, Information, Knowledge, Intelligence Systems Data - what was (NFS); Information - what is (LFS); Knowledge - what could be (HFS); Intelligence - what should be (HFS).
  • 3.9.7.2 SASAMS System 1. 2. 3. 4. Knowing Under- Teaching Another standing Teaching 7. 6. 5. Another Learning Support Learning 8. 9. 10. Assessment Support Evaluation
  • 3.9.8 Multiple Opportunities Low-functioning School Quarter 1 Test or Quarter 2 Test or Quarter 3 Test or Quarter 4 Test or Teach Exam Teach Exam Teach Exam Teach Exam High-functioning School Quarter 1 Test or Quarter 2 Test or Quarter 3 Test or Support Test or Teach Exam Teach Exam Teach Exam and Exam Support
  • 3.9.9.1 Time Utilisation Low-functioning School High-functioning School 20% Teaching 20% Teaching 20% Teaching 20% Learning 20% Teaching 20% Learning 20% Teaching 20% Learning 20% Learning 20% Learning
  • 3.9.9.2 What do we know about our teachers and/or officials? Remembering Teaching (Information Sharing) Remembering Understanding Teaching Learning (Information Sharing) (Taking ownership of Information)
  • 3.9.9.3 Types of Teaching - Learning None or to Little time and support for Learning Teaching and Learning Teaching Learning Plenty of time and support for Learning Teaching for Learning Teaching and Learning All the time and support are for Learning Teaching as Teaching Learning Teaching Learning Teaching Learning Learning Teaching Learning Teaching Learning Teaching Learning Teaching Learning Teaching Learning Teaching Learning
  • 3.9.9.4 Activity 3
  • 3.9.10 Homework vis-à-vis Schoolwork vis-à-vis Busywork vis-à-vis Parent’s work • Learning takes place throughout the day, whether ‘in school’ or ‘out of school’; • They can be categorised as ‘different’ types of learning; • Given different situations and circumstances, the one becomes more important than the other; • We need all of them in our lives.
  • 3.10 Five Levels of Learning Level Teaching Type of Days Teaching 1 35 Facts 2 70 Information 3 105 Know-How 4 140 Comprehension 5 175 Wisdom
  • 3.11 Bloom’s Level of learning and Thinking 1. Know - Define, match, repeat, memorise, label, outline, record, recognise, state, sort, list 2. Understand - Restate, show, illustrate, summarise, predict, locate, paraphrase, describe, explain 3. Apply - Demonstrate, solve, test, use, manipulate, organise 4. Analyse - Examine, debate/defend, compare/contrast, refute, relate, generalise, classify, research 5. Synthesise - Propose, design, construct, invent, formulate, plan, imagine 6. Evaluate - Judge, recommend, critique/criticise, justify, choose
  • 3.12 Learning: From Past to Future
  • 3.13 You Taught Me • You taught me the names of cities in the world, but; • I don’t know how to survive the streets in my own city; • You taught me the minerals that are in the earth, but; • I do not know what to do to prevent my world’s destruction; • You taught me how to speak and write in three languages, but; • I do no know how to say what I feel in my heart; • You taught me all about reproduction in rats, but; • I don’t know how to avoid pregnancy; • You taught me how to solve maths problems, but; • I still can’t solve my own problems; • Yes, you taught me many facts, and thank you, I am now quite clever, but; • Why is it that I feel I know nothing? Why do I feel I have to leave school to go and learn about coping with life?
  • 3.14 Video - Essence of being a Teacher - 6 min
  • 4. Administration, Management and Leadership
  • 4.1 Management vs Leadership - 2.10 min
  • 4.2 Leadership Criteria - 9.31 min
  • 4.3 Quest for Success - 2.05 min
  • 4.4 Conceptual Argument - Types of Functionalities (relating to the Core Purpose) Non- Low High Functioning Functioning Functioning Schools Schools Schools (NFS) (LFS) (HFS) Leadership Level 1 Management Level 2 Administration Level 3
  • 4.5 There is no management without monitoring and evaluation
  • 4.6 Why should we M&E? In general, the purpose of monitoring & evaluation can be: • To assess results - to find out if and how objectives are being met and are resulting in desired changes. • To improve management and process planning - to better adapt to contextual and risk factors such as social and power dynamics that affect the research process. • To promote learning - to identify lessons of general applicability, to learn how different approaches to participation affect outcomes, impact, and reach, to learn what works and what does not, and to identify what contextual factors enable or constrain the participatory research. • To understand different stakeholders' perspectives - to allow, through direct participation in the monitoring and evaluation process, the various people involved in the organisation to better understand each others views and values and to design ways to resolve competing or conflicting views and interests. • To ensure accountability - to assess whether the organisation is effectively, appropriately, and efficiently executed to be accountable to they key agencies (Estrella and Gaventa, 1998). What?, When? How?, Who?
  • 4.7 Money taken by Administration
  • 4.8 Two parts of any organisational process Hard part Soft part •Processes •Ideas •Procedures •Fears •Metrics •Excitement •Structures •Resistance •Tools •Attitudes •Etc. •Buy-in of people who do the Hard Part
  • 4.9 Which is more challenging, the Hard part or Soft part? • Soft part; • Hard part we have learned; • Management - is about control; • The soft part is about leadership; • Both of these are important within an organisation - Balance; • Work is Logical, but People are Psychological.
  • 4.10 Leadership Qualities
  • 4.11 Eight School Readiness Components 4. Annual Planning 5. Timetabling 2. Teacher Information 1.1 Teacher Attendance 6. Teaching 1.2 Learner Attendance Schedules 3. Learner Information 8. Teaching and Learning Support Materials 7. Organogram
  • Homework 1.1 • Collect enough evidence on each of the mentioned eight school readiness components; • On a scale of 1 - 5, ask the principal to indicate the school readiness of his/her school on each of the eight components; • On a scale of 1 - 5, you have to give your rating of your school, on each of the eight school readiness components.
  • Gauteng Schools with challenges Project Manager Schools Division No Name of School Project District Location Grade 12 Results 2009 Manager 2008 Variance Up Down Same 1 Boikgethelo 35 49 14 1 2 Bona Comprehensive 3 Ed Mashabane Sec 4 Fontanus 5 Ibhongo 4.12 PPS Project Nombulelo Nombulelo JHB North Sedibeng West JHB Evaton 50 24 27 47 53 26 34 46 3 2 7 -1 1 1 1 1 6 Ikusasa Comprehensive Nombulelo Ekurhuleni North Tembisa 46 73 27 1 7 Illinge Sec Deon Ekhuruleni South Vosloorus 26 46 20 1 8 Itirele-Zenzele Comp Nombulelo JHB North Diepsloot 29 38 9 1 9 Jet Nteo 38 39 1 1 10 Katlehong Sec Deon Ekhuruleni South Katlehong 48 38 -10 1 11 Kgokare 29 46 17 1 12 Kwa Bhekilanga 28 28 1 13 Lobone 39 22 -17 1 14 Mamellong Comp Conrad Gauteng East Tsakane 48 66 18 1 15 Meadowlands 29 52 23 1 16 Memezelo Sec Conrad Tswane North Soshanguve 33 68 35 1 17 Minerva 30 65 35 1 18 Modiri Technical Conrad Tswane West Tswane West 12 30 18 1 19 Moqhaka 27 39 12 1 20 Mphumelomuhle Sec Conrad Gauteng North Bronkhorspruit 30 16 -14 1 21 Mpilisweni Sec Deon Ekhuruleni South Katlehong 42 38 -4 1 22 Nghunghunyane 51 46 -5 1 23 Ramolelle 40 96 56 1 24 Ramosukula 42 46 4 1 25 Rivoni High Conrad Gauteng East Daveyton 0 26 Sebokeng Tech 45 63 18 1 27 Senthibele Senior Sec Conrad Tswane North Soshanguve 48 85 37 1 28 Thoko-Thaba Sec Conrad Ekhuruleni South Thokoza 55 54 -1 1 29 Thutopele High Deon Ekhuruleni South Katlehong 55 51 -4 1 30 Vosloorus Comprehensive Deon Ekhuruleni South Vosloorus 66 66 0 1 31 Westbury Secondary Nombulelo JHB North JHB 56 48 -8 1 Ave. 10.9 20 9 1 62.5% 28.1% 3.1% Ave. 19.2 -7.1
  • 4.13 Curriculum Development Cycle Curriculum Instructional Learning Assessment Management Management Management Management Plan Plan Plan Plan District School HoD Teacher Provincial District SMT HoD
  • Homework 1.2 • Bring along evidence of the existence of a curriculum management planning tool in your district; • Bring along evidence of the existence of an instructional management planning tool in your school; • Bring along evidence of the existence of a learning management planning tool in your department (school); • Bring along evidence of the existence of an assessment management planning tool in your class (school).
  • 5. Conclusion
  • 5.1 Three Steps approach to QE
  • 5.2 Graphical display of 3 steps QE Quality Education Low Functioning Basic Education Schools Dysfunctional Rights-based Education Schools *Availability *Accessibility * Acceptability * Adaptability
  • 5.3 Teacher Professional Path 1. First five to eight years (as teachers); (BT) 2. Second phase [nine to twelve years] as teacher; (T) 3. First five to eight years (as senior teachers/mentor); (ST) 4. Second phase [nine to twelve years] as mentor; (HoD) 5. First three to five years (as Head of Department); (HoD) 6. First three to five years (as Deputy Principal); 7. First three to five years (as Principal); 8. Second phase [six to ten years] as Principal; 9. Third phase [eleven to twenty years +] as Principal; 10. Etc. BT1-4 T5-8 T9-12 HoD1-4 HoD5-8 HoD9-12 Pr1-4 Pr5-8 Pr9-12 Pr13 ST1-4 ST5-8 ST9-12 DP1-4 DP5-8 DP5-8 22-26 27-30 31-34 35-38 39-42 43-46 47-50 51-54 55-58 59-62 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs 4yrs
  • 5.4.1 Ten Untruths in UPS 1. Democratic decision making in schools create a conducive school tone or culture; 2. Parent involvement is crucial; 3. OBE approach is resource intensive; 4. Resources (computers and libraries) will make all the difference; 5. The Dept. is not supporting teachers and therefore they are de-motivated;
  • 5.4.2 Ten Untruths in UPS 6. Lack of learning is caused by the ill-discipline of learners; 7. Our classrooms are overcrowded - small classes will make the difference; 8. It is difficult to achieve learner success in poverty stricken communities; 9. Learners are not at the level they should be when they get to our schools (no pre- or nursery school; can’t read and write) 10. Teacher development will solve most of our performance problems.
  • 5.5 Five Basic Assumptions of Effective Schools 1. The central purpose of a school is to teach; 2. The school is responsible for providing the overall environment; 3. Schools must be treated holistically in terms of instruction (unity); 4. The most crucial characteristics of a school are the attitudes and behaviours of the teachers and staff; 5. The school accepts responsibility for the success and failure of the academic performance of learners - all learners are capable of learning.
  • Video - Brave decision by deputy principal
  • Homework 1.3 • Download for www.slideshare.net the video called LBL - Brave decision by the deputy principal; • Introduction - This is a conversation with the current principal and deputy principal of the school. Godfrey joined the school in 2002, six months after the school was opened, a the deputy principal of the school. Edith joined the school in 2006, as an HoD. In 2007, the principal retired, and Godfrey acted as principal until 2008, when the post was advertised. By then, Edith was the second deputy principal of the school. Both of them applied for the post. Now view the video; • Write a critical analysis of the challenges in the video, what lead to it, and what should be done to stabilise the education system.
  • Assignment 1 THEMES TOPICS Knowing and understanding the difference between Leading, Write an essay, focusing on a Managing, Administring, Teaching and Learning combination of the con cepts covered during session 1. The ess ay must include references of at least 1 0 1 Defining teaching and learning. 2 What is the difference? articles recent (not older that 5 years) 3 How do they inter-connect? within the field of focus. 4 W h ich one comes first? Due date: 5 Defining leadership, management and administration. 27 February 2010 6 What is the difference? 7 How do they inter-connect? 8 What is the logical order? 9 What should be the core job of principals? 10 During training, should we focus on knowledge, skills or disposition of principals, or a combination of them?
  • 5.6 Quote of the Day! You can’t do things differently until you see things differently.
  • Contact details: • E-mail: muavia@mweb.co.za; • Fax: 0866720520 • Cell: 0828229494 (only emergencies) • Powerpoint website: www.slideshare.net Thank You!