UP ACE MTL Unit 2 Session 4

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UP ACE MTL Unit 2 Session 4

  1. 1. Module 2: Managing Teaching and Learning Unit 2: Plan and Implement a Curriculum Session 4 Presenter: Dr Muavia Gallie (PhD) 9 May 2009 1
  2. 2. Content 1. Introduction; 2. Concept of Curriculum 3. Impact of organisational structure on curriculum delivery 4. Overview of the NCS 5. Curriculum data collection and management 6. Learning and teaching support materials (LTMS); 7. Conclusion 2
  3. 3. Question 4.1 Did your school close early on the 21 April 2009 (the day before the Elections), and on the 30 April 2009 (the before May day)? 3
  4. 4. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% HFS LFS NFS 4
  5. 5. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 2.1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Components 30% LFS NFS 5
  6. 6. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 2.2 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Teaching Components 40% 30% LFS NFS 6
  7. 7. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 2.3 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Teaching Learning Components 40% 50% 30% LFS NFS 7
  8. 8. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 2.4 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% LFS NFS 8
  9. 9. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 2.5 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% Time-on-Task LFS NFS 9
  10. 10. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% LFS NFS 10
  11. 11. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.2 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness LFS Components 30% NFS 11
  12. 12. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.3 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness LFS Assessment Components 20% 30% NFS 12
  13. 13. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.4 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 10% NFS 13
  14. 14. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.5 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 30% 10% NFS 14
  15. 15. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.6 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% NFS 15
  16. 16. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 3.7 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% Time-on-Task NFS 16
  17. 17. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% NFS 17
  18. 18. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.2 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness NFS Components 30% 18
  19. 19. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.3 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness NFS Learning for Components Assessment 20% 30% 19
  20. 20. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.4 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness Disruptions NFS Learning for Components & Chaos Assessment 20% 30% 20% 20
  21. 21. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.5 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness Disruptions NFS Learning for Teaching Components & Chaos Assessment 20% 20% 30% 20% 21
  22. 22. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.6 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness Learn- Disruptions NFS Learning for Teaching Components ing & Chaos Assessment 20% 20% 30% 10% 20% 22
  23. 23. Logistics of Teaching and Learning 4.7 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% School Readiness HFS Assess- 90% Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30% School Readiness Disrup- LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 20% 30% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness Learn- Disruptions NFS Learning for Teaching 30% Components ing & Chaos Assessment 20% 20% 30% 10% 20% 23 Time-on-Task
  24. 24. Question 4.2 • Is your school Dysfunctional? • Ten critical questions for every school leader 1. Does every teacher teach everyday in every class for 196 school days in the year? [10] 2. Do you as school leader regularly observe teachers teaching in their classrooms? [10] 3. Do you spend at least 70% of your time in school on matters of teaching and learning? [10] 4. Do you regularly visit parents of learners in their homes? [10] 5. Is your school consistently clean, ordered and well-decorated in ways that convey positive sentiments about the learning environment? [10] 6. Do more than 95% of learners pass the highest grade in the school every year for the past five years? [10] 7. Do more than 98% of learners enrolled attend school everyday? [10] 8. Does every learner have a textbook in every subject? [10] 9. Does your school bring in at least R100,000 every year in external (private) funds e.g. the business community? [10] 10. In the case of High Schools, do at least 80% of your learners go on to university/university of technology? In the case of Primary Schools, do all your learners go on to high school? 24 Prof. Jonathan Jansen (Executive Leadership Programme 2008)
  25. 25. Functionality Score for your school 100 A Functional School 80 A Moderately Functional School 60 A Marginally functional School 40 A Seriously Dysfunctional School 20 A School? 25
  26. 26. 8 School Readiness Components Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% School Readiness LFS Components 30% School Readiness NFS Components 30% 26
  27. 27. School Readiness Components 1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism School Readiness LFS Components 30% School Readiness NFS Components 30% 27
  28. 28. School Readiness Components 2 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness LFS Components 30% School Readiness NFS Components 30% 28
  29. 29. School Readiness Components 3 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner Information LFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% School Readiness NFS Components 30% 29
  30. 30. School Readiness Components 4 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner Information LFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% 4. High level of disruption and violence 4. Annual Planning School Readiness NFS Components 30% 30
  31. 31. School Readiness Components 5 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner Information LFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% 4. High level of disruption and violence 4. Annual Planning 5. Unclear academic standards 5. Implementable and flexible timetable School Readiness NFS Components 30% 31
  32. 32. School Readiness Components 6 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner Information LFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% 4. High level of disruption and violence 4. Annual Planning 5. Unclear academic standards 5. Implementable and flexible timetable 6. Quarterly Teaching School Readiness schedules NFS Components 30% 32
  33. 33. School Readiness Components 7 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner Information LFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% 4. High level of disruption and violence 4. Annual Planning 5. Unclear academic standards 5. Implementable and flexible timetable 6. Quarterly Teaching School Readiness schedules NFS Components 7. Organogram 30% 33
  34. 34. School Readiness Components 8 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 8 School Readiness Components School Readiness HFS Components Indicators of NFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner Attendance 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner Information LFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% 4. High level of disruption and violence 4. Annual Planning 5. Unclear academic standards 5. Implementable and flexible timetable 6. Quarterly Teaching School Readiness schedules NFS Components 7. Organogram 30% 34 8. Learner and Teacher support materials
  35. 35. Research - High Poverty Schools 0 2007 35
  36. 36. Research - High Poverty Elements of High-Performing, High-Poverty Schools Nationally: Schools 1 Mass Insight’s “Readiness” model 36
  37. 37. Research - High Poverty Schools 2 The challenge: virtually no high-performance work is being done in high-poverty settings at scale 37
  38. 38. Research - High Poverty Schools 3 Instead: Most scaled-up reform has been limited to providing help for marginal program change 38
  39. 39. Research - High Poverty Schools 4 Some interventions have also focused on changing people as well as programming 39
  40. 40. Research - High Poverty Schools 5 New experiments in some districts are requiring changes in operating conditions as well 40
  41. 41. Research - High Poverty Schools 6 Where we should all be aiming: comprehensive turnaround that includes program, people, and conditions change 41
  42. 42. Research - High Poverty Schools 7 What’s Stopping You? Create a map of the design challenges in your way Human capacity Adequacy of teacher workforce – Adequacy of top and distributed team leadership – Adequacy of outside support system (all partners and TA) – Operating conditions Freedom to act: authority over key resources (money, time, people, – programming) to make mission- and data-driven decisions Freedom from unproductive or overlapping compliance burdens – Incentives that drive adult (and student) behavior – Resources Adequacy of time for learning – Adequacy of time for teacher planning, collaboration, PD – Adequacy of resource support in general (class size, facilities, etc.) – 42
  43. 43. Research - High Poverty Schools 8 So: What would reform that incorporates all three sides of the triangle look like? The 3 ‘C’s of comprehensive, coherent, transformative reform 1 Conditions Change the rules and incentives governing people, time, money, & program 2 Capacity Build turnaround resources & human capacity in schools and lead partners 3 Clustering Organize in clusters by region, need, or type -- where new conditions apply and states/districts create special capacity 43
  44. 44. Research - High Poverty Schools 9 Conditions Change: Outside-the-system approaches, applied inside the system 44
  45. 45. Given flexible operating conditions: what becomes possible? Key Implementation Strategies Research -mission-driven authority over Time10 High Poverty Schools …Requiring  Extend the school day to address the academic and social needs of high-poverty student population, including  Time for a robust, well-rounded curriculum and engaging teaching & learning practices (project-based learning, etc.)  Time to diagnose and address health and human service needs, and to provide direct instruction in good learning behaviors and life skills  Time for advisories and other student time with individual adult champions Readiness  Adjust the school schedule to foster close adult-student relationships by incorporating to Learn  Advisories  Looping and longer block schedules  Small-group tutorials  Increase student-adult contact time by improving the ratio of teachers and social support personnel to students  Adopt “early start” school configurations, with high schools operating grades 6 or 7 though 12, and elementaries benefitting from universal preschool feeders  Secure extra teacher hours necessary for a professional learning culture, with collaboration and development opportunities – every day or week – including:  Time to develop teachers and administrators to understand how poverty effects learning and performance, and how to implement strategies to address these impacts Readiness  Time for teachers to train and participate in data-driven decision making, intervention and differentiated instruction to Teach  Time for teachers to plan, share instructional practice and review student work as a team of experts (hospital model)  Adjust the school schedule and annual calendar to allow for critical personalized learning strategy, including: The administration and rapid analysis of results from frequent, short feedback loop assessments 45  Regular and generous common planning blocks for teachers to act collaboratively in adjusting instruction
  46. 46. Given flexible operating conditions: what becomes possible? ResearchImplementation Strategies 11 Key - High Poverty Schools …Requiring mission-driven authority over Money  Use additional funds to  Allocate extra money to extend school day to address academic and social needs of high-poverty student population Readiness  Allocate money to decreasing class and possibly school size to enhance student-adult relationships to Learn  Raise additional financial resources by approaching private companies and philanthropic organizations .  Be creative in using public financing options and statutory program resources, within relevant restrictions, to fund turnaround strategies.  Identify and undertake capital improvements necessary for safety and the creation of a positive climate  Use additional funds to  Allocate extra money for teacher hours needed for participation in professional learning culture and individual/small group contact with students (from RA)  Allocate money to ensure that teacher support, training and resources will support performance Readiness expectations to Teach  Use school control over budgets to  Differentiate teacher compensation for extra time or responsibilities (from RA)  Offer schoolwide financial incentives to implement turnaround approach and for attainment of performance objectives  Analyze existing budget and re-align spending to focus on turnaround goals and student achievement 46
  47. 47. Given flexible operating conditions: what becomes possible? ResearchImplementation Strategies 12 Key - High Poverty Schools …Requiring mission-driven authority over Program  Develop a rounded, engaging curriculum that, in addition to personalized instruction in the core areas of ELA and math:  Includes the arts, languages, technology, physical education and other avenues to learning  Increases engagement through interdisciplinary curricula, technology-based instruction, etc.  Addresses choice and the range of student needs (e.g. interest-based pathways , alternative programs for behavioral challenges)  Provides explicit instruction and guidance for the development of good learning behaviors  Provides direct instruction in life skills relevant to students’ situations (and addresses potential challenges, e.g. drug, alcohol, violence and drop-out prevention programs,) Readiness  Create programs to increase individual student-teacher contact, including: to Learn  Create advisory groups in which students participate regularly  Schedule regular home visits from teachers, advisors and counselors  Form alliances with community partners and social service providers to address:  Health needs (breakfast, eye exams, pregnancy, etc.), and  Human service needs (social, behavioral, abuse, homelessness, etc.)  Create programs to address safety and discipline, including:  Create well-defined but flexible routines and spell out codes of behavior in explicit and transparent ways. Embed these in school structure, rituals and culture.  Provide students with explicit instruction in cooperative learning and individual responsibility  Design and integrate a powerful personalized learning program to monitor and improve individual and group achievement, especially in the core areas of ELA and math: Readiness  Create aligned formative assessments to Teach  Develop tools and methods for data to be captured & used quickly in a short feedback loop to diagnose learning needs  Develop methods for using data to be used to improve curriculum & classroom instruction 47  Actively reshape and incorporate districtwide initiatives into school strategies for maximizing performance
  48. 48. Capacity-Building/Internal (school leadership): Necessary turnaround skills Research - High Poverty Schools 13 among school leaders An imperative to recruit and train school leaders who can: Concentrate on a few changes with big, fast payoffs   Implement proven practices first; ask forgiveness later  Communicate a clear, positive vision  Collect, personally analyze, use data well  Enlist key influencers to support major change  Build culture of disclosure in open-air meetings  Require all staff to adopt changes – not optional  Act in relentless pursuit of goals, touting progress only as a  passing way-station Adapted from Kowal and Hassel, Turnarounds with New Leaders and Staff, Learning Point Associates, 2005, 48
  49. 49. Capacity-building/external: addressing the “projectitis” Research - High school reform afflicting Poverty Schools 14 49
  50. 50. Capacity-building/external: A new model: deeply embedded lead turnaround Research - High Poverty Schools 15 partners, integrating the work of other providers 50
  51. 51. Capacity-building/external: Differences between the traditional school/provider Research - High Poverty Schools 16 model and lead turnaround partners & managers Function/ Role Traditional Model Lead Turnaround Lead Turnaround Partner Manager Authority None or advisory Shared with district Full authority and/or state Accountability None (except to Shared with district Full accountability extend contract) and/or state Intensity Varies, but often 1 2 to 5 days in school Fully embedded: day in school per per week managing the school month Relationship to None (usually) Integrator, with Full authority over all Other Partners school, of all other partner/subcontractors providers Services Single service All academic services All academic services Provided (except for and oversight of all and oversight of all Comprehensive others others School Reform 51 models)
  52. 52. THE WAY FORWARD Clustering: Research - High Poverty Schools 17 For effectiveness, efficiency, and scale 52 52
  53. 53. ANALYSIS Why has so little fundamental change Research - High Poverty Schools 18 occurred nationally in failing schools to date? Lack of leverage: No real help from Outside;  incremental reforms remain the common choice Lack of capacity: In state agencies, districts,  schools, partners Lack of exemplars: No successful models at  scale, no real consensus even on definitions Lack of public will: Failing schools have no  constituency; hence, insufficient funding to date 53 53
  54. 54. THE WAY FORWARD A Partnership Framework for Research - High Poverty Schools 19 School Turnaround 54 54
  55. 55. A framework to expand the spectrum of turnaround options Research - High Poverty Schools 20 55
  56. 56. Homework 4.1 • Bring examples from your school that represents the 8 School Readiness Components: - Teachers and Learners attendance register: - Teachers information; - Learners information; - Annual planning; - Timetable; - Quarterly Teaching Schedules; - Organogram; - Teachers and Learners Support Materials. 56
  57. 57. Knowledge Management 1 57
  58. 58. Knowledge Management 2 58
  59. 59. Knowledge Management 3 59
  60. 60. Knowledge Management 3 (Input) 60
  61. 61. Knowledge Management 4 (Output) 61
  62. 62. Career stages and CPTD 1 62
  63. 63. Career stages and CPTD 2 63
  64. 64. Homework 4.2 • Based on Homework 3.1 and 3.2, identify the following: - The different Career stages of the teachers in your school; - The different Professional Development needed by your teachers in the different stages. 64
  65. 65. Operation of the NCS in schools • Working week Macro • Timetable time level School • Staffing numbers • Rooming issues • Class-size-ratio • Timetabling • Assessment - Recording - Reporting • Continuous Teacher Professional Development • Governance involvement Meso Learning Areas/Subjects Departments level issues Micro * Planning * Time * Delivery * Testing Teacher level issues 65
  66. 66. Time-on-Task 1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% HFS 90% Teaching Learning 40% 50% LFS Teaching Learning 50% 30% 20% Learn- NFS Teaching 30% ing 20% 10% 66
  67. 67. Time-on-Task 2.1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% HFS 90% Teaching Learning 40% 50% •4.5 days p.w. •176 days p.a. LFS Teaching Learning 50% 30% 20% Learn- NFS Teaching 30% ing 20% 67 10%
  68. 68. Time-on-Task 2.2 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% HFS 90% Teaching Learning 40% 50% •4.5 days p.w. •176 days p.a. LFS Teaching Learning 50% 30% 20% •2.5 days p.w. •98 days p.a. Learn- NFS Teaching 30% ing 20% 68 10%
  69. 69. Time-on-Task 2.3 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% HFS 90% Teaching Learning 40% 50% •4.5 days p.w. •176 days p.a. LFS Teaching Learning 50% 30% 20% •2.5 days p.w. •98 days p.a. Learn- NFS Teaching 30% ing 20% 69 10% •1.67 days p.w. •65 days p.a.
  70. 70. Time-on-Task 3 Previous Year Current Academic Year 90% 100% 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% HFS 90% Teaching Learning 40% 50% 4.5 days p.w. LFS Teaching Learning 50% 30% 20% 2.5 days p.w. Learn- NFS Teaching 30% ing 20% 70 10% 1.67 days p.w.
  71. 71. Level 1 - Facts • The first level of learning deals with facts-details or data which result from direct observation and research. • Facts make up the most basic level of learning. • Taken on their own at this level, facts have no direct application. • But without facts, you cannot move on to the other levels of learning. 71
  72. 72. Level 2 - Information • The second level of learning deals with information-observational data in a usable form. • The descriptions that information consists of tell who, what, when, where, and how many. • With information, you can begin to make use of facts. 72
  73. 73. Level 3 - Know-how • Know-how is the focus of the third level of learning. • Know-how consists of a collection of descriptions in the form of instructions. • Know-how is about having the instructions you need to make use of the information you have. • With know-how, you derive knowledge from experience. 73
  74. 74. Level 4 - Comprehension • The fourth level of learning deals with comprehension. • Comprehension answers the question quot;Why?quot; • At the comprehension level, learning is composed of explanations. • When you understand why, you are better able to use the knowledge and know-how you already have. 74
  75. 75. Level 5 - Wisdom • Wisdom is the focus of the fifth and final level of learning. • Wisdom is the ability to evaluate, and it incorporates values. • It is essential for development. • Using know-how and comprehension without wisdom can result in actions that don't work for the overall mission of the learning process. 75
  76. 76. Question 4.3 Which level of learning is facilitated in your school? 76
  77. 77. 5 Levels of Learning Level Teaching Type of Days Teaching 1 35 Facts 2 70 Information 3 105 Know-How 4 140 Comprehension 5 175 Wisdom 77
  78. 78. Quote of the Day! If you don’t change, change will change you, or change will replace you. 78

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