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Turning around strategy for South African dysfunctional and underperforming schoolsbrief

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  • 1. Turn Around StrategyFor Dysfunctional and Under- performing Schools Presenter: Dr Muavia Gallie (PhD) muavia@mweb.co.za Turn-Around Consortium (TAC)
  • 2. Content1. Identifying the Problem (3-4)2. Traditional Approach (5-7)3. Transformative Approach (8-13)4. Turn-Around Strategy (14-22)5. Principles Issues (23-28)6. Strategy based in Research (29-37)7. Preliminary Implementation Success (38-46) - after 6 months (8. Conclusion (47)
  • 3. 1.1 % Different Types of schools in SA Quality of Pass (Grades) 100% 90% 80% 70% 60%Quantity of Pass 50% 40% 20% 30% 20% 50% 10% 0% 20% -10% -20% 10% Anti- Dysfunctional Under- High- Functional Performing Performing
  • 4. 1.2 Types of SchoolsI don’t want to I don’t know I know it all I better learnknowManaging what Do what you Sort out the gaps - Success asyou don’t know have to do believes, skills, a habit thinking and attitudesDestructive, Dysfunctionality Under-performance Highchaotic, anti- performancefunctionalityIt’s their fault - Complying with We are not in the Successblame it on DoE ‘dog box’ - success beyondothers requirements at school schools
  • 5. 2.1 Time-on-Task 1 Previous Year Current Academic Year 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%HFS Teaching 40% 90% Learning 50% •4.5 days p.w. •176 days p.a.LFS Teaching Learning 30% 50% 20% •2.5 days p.w. •98 days p.a. Learn-NFS Teaching •1.67 days p.w. 20% 30% ing 10% •65 days p.a.
  • 6. 2.2 Time-on-Task 2 Previous Year Current Academic Year 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%HFS Teaching 40% 90% Learning 50% 4.5 days p.w.LFS Teaching Learning 30% 50% 20% 2.5 days p.w. Learn-NFS Teaching 20% 30% ing 10% 1.67 days p.w.
  • 7. 2.3 Traditional Approach Previous Year Current Academic Year 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100%HFS School Readiness 90% Assess- Teaching Learning Components ment 40% 50% 10% 30%LFS School Readiness Disrup- Components 30% Teaching 30% 50% Learning 20% tions 10% Assessment 20%DFS School Readiness Learn- Disruptions Learning for Components 30% Teaching 20% 30% ing 10% & Chaos 20% Assessment 20% 7 Time-on-Task
  • 8. 3.1 Transformative Approach Previous Year Current Academic Year 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% School Readiness Assess-HFS Components 30% Teaching 40% 90% Learning 50% ment 10% School Readiness Disrup-LFS Teaching Learning 50% Assessment Components tions 30% 20% 20% 30% 10% School Readiness Learn- Disruptions Learning forDFS Teaching Components 30% 20% 30% ing 10% & Chaos 20% Assessment 20% Time-on-Task
  • 9. 3.2 School Readiness Components 8 Previous Year Current Academic Year 30% 20% 10% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% School Readiness 8 School Readiness ComponentsHFS Components Indicators of DFS SRC Component 30% 1.1 High rate of staff absenteeism 1. Teacher and Learner 1.2 High rate of learner absenteeism Attendance 2.1 High rate of staff turnover 2. Teacher Information 2.2 Negative school atmosphere School Readiness 3.1 Low learner performance 3. Learner InformationLFS Components 3.2 High dropout rates of learners 30% 4. High level of disruption and violence 4. Annual Planning 5. Unclear academic standards 5. Implementable and flexible timetable 6. Quarterly Teaching School Readiness schedulesDFS Components 7. Organogram 30% 8. Learner and Teacher support materials
  • 10. 3.3 HFS LFS DFS Teaching Teaching 20% Teaching 30% 40% Learning 10% Learning Assessment 20% 20% Assessment Learning Disruptions 20% 20% 50% Disruptions 10% School Readiness School Components Readiness Assessment 10% 30% Comp. - 20% SRC - 30% SRC - 10% SRC - 0%
  • 11. 3.4 HFS LFS DFS Teaching Teaching 20% Teaching 30% 40% Learning 10% Learning Assessment 20% 20% Assessment Learning 20% 50% Assessment 10% SRC - 30% SRC - 10% SRC - 0%
  • 12. 3.5 HFS LFS DFS Teaching Teaching 20% Teaching 30% 40% Learning 10% Learning Assessment 20% 20% ing d Assessment arn an Learning 20% 50% Le ing d an h g ac hin ing ac arn Te Te Le Assessment 10% SRC - 30% SRC - 30% SRC - 0%
  • 13. 4.1 Different types of Turn-Around1. Chaotic schools - To build up the love for and importance of education, in order to show that success in school has benefits beyond school;2. Dysfunctional schools - Develop a routine in order to stabilise the activities in order for all learners to pass;3. Under-performing schools - Raise the expectations that all learners can achieve in order to be successful.4. High functioning schools - To ensure that all learners get a pass that will allow them to enter a higher education institution, and/or career programme.
  • 14. 4.2 Turn-around Strategy Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4Focus • Buying into this • SRC tools • SRC + CMM • Ensuring strategy development implementation sustainability • Design CMM • Closing gapsParticipants • Principal, SMT and • Principal and SMT • School staff • District SGB reps (professional and • School leaders support) • CommunityData tools • (B) Baseline Survey (P) • 8 School Readiness • Staff development • Compliance • (D) SRC self-rating (P Components = • Teacher • Governance + SMT) Attendance, T+L Info, professional Annual Plan, TT, TL • Operational • (A) Functionality development management Schedules, Questionnaire (S) Organogram, TLSM • T+L intelligence • CMM = Attendance, systems SBA, Curr. completionPeriod • 2 days (full days) Or • 3 - 6 months • 1,5 - 2 years • 6 - 12 months • 6 x 2.5 hoursMethods • Workshops • Face to face site • Face to face site • Workshops + Face to • All schools together work work face site work • Muavia Gallie • Individual schools • Individual schools • Individual schools • Mentors • Mentors + Experts • Muavia Gallie
  • 15. 4.3 Turn-Around Road MapKnowing Re-organising Re-planning Executing• Find out what is • Assign a timeframe to • Break the turn- • Get some going on; the turn-around around into chunks points on the• Decide what is • Add clarity and depth to take advantage board not ‘good to fuzzy requirements of mid-course • Be transparent enough’; • Make it hard to hide corrections with schedules• Set new targets problems • Rein in scope, and and status (expectations); • Clear technical trim non-essential information• Communicate problems that is features • Create frequent intention to delaying the turn • Look ahead for status stakeholders around progress icebergs checkpoints• Find time to do • Add carefully chosen • Protect team the planning resources only where members from needed being borrowed/ side-tracked
  • 16. 4.4 Turn Around Process1. Create a sense of urgency (by analysing learner performance data; by looking at the academic effectiveness of the school and district; by looking at wide gap between current and desired performance);2. Setting ambitious targets (double learner performance; no performance below a basic level);3. Adopt a new curriculum management model (new programmes; common understanding of effective instruction; systemic view of curriculum);4. Use a battery of assessments (formative and diagnostic for instructional strategies; end-of- curriculum units for what learners have learned; benchmark for gauging overall performance);5. Create and implement an CPD programme (collaborative teacher teams; school based coaches; making use of learner data; intensive summer camps to gain new knowledge);6. Extended learning opportunities (learning time; extra help; one-on-one; small-groups; extended day; winter programmes);7. Utilising time more effectively (core instructional time for reading, math, science; devote time to teaching and learning;8. Extend leadership corps (grade leaders; instructional coaches; instructional leadership by principal; support from district;9. Create professional culture (read recent research; reach out to experts; use best practice; assess impact on learner learning; improve instructional practice);10. Manage human capital (attract talent; look for expertise)
  • 17. 4.5 Strategic Planning Process1. Success - What is the Pot of Gold? Vision2. Space - What differentiates you from other organisations?3. Strengths - What are the experience, competencies, knowledge, assets, resources and other advantages you have? Gap4. Situation - Where are we, and where are we going? Exposing the Gap.5. Strategies - What are the actions necessary to fill/fix the Gap? Strategies6. Steps - What to Do Now?7. Safeguards - How do we make sure we have it Right?
  • 18. 4.6 Turn-around Theory Common Characteristics If you can’t Think it,1. Constant crisis (Think); You can’t Do it!2. Organisational insanity Function Ownership Tools Process (Think); Think Do Feel (Planning) (Implementing) (Monitoring and Evaluating)3. Cluelessness (Think);4. Relative Success (Think); 8 SRC PD Accountability5. Sub-Optimisation (Think);6. Indirect Causes (Think); Principal All (Principal, Teachers,7. ‘Sorry is Okay’ mentality & SMT Teachers SGB & District) (Think);8. Segmented morals - School Teaching Governance situational ethics (Feel); Readiness & Learning & Support9. Multiple clicks/ groups (Do);10. Broken behaviour- consequence chain (Do).
  • 19. 4.7 Core FocusFocus 1: EqualityFocus 2: AccessFocus 3: EquityFocus 4: QualityFocus 5: Equality + Access + Equity = Quality Quantity
  • 20. 4.8 5 Levels of LearningLevel Teaching Type of Days Teaching 1 35 Facts 2 70 Information 3 105 Know-How 4 140 Comprehension 5 175 Wisdom 20
  • 21. Current educational IntelligencesNo Intelligences Good with …1. Recall Associative2. Mathematical Quantitative3. Verbal Communicative4. Conceptual Analytical5. Logical Organisational
  • 22. Ignored Intelligences for Life SuccessNo Intelligences Good with …1. Visionary Anticipatory2. Musical Auditory (listen)3. Functional Operational4. Strategic Systemic5. Intuitive Psychic6. Tactile Sensory (touch)7. Imaginative Creative8. Visual Observational (see)9. Social Relational10. Attentiveness Caring11. Kinesthetic Physical12. Technical Mechanical (feel)13. Empathetic Supportive14. Spatial Relational15. Humour Novelty16. Openness Receptivity17. Gastronomic Olfactory (smell)18. Interpretive Diagnostic19. Selfless Altruistic20. Representational Expressive
  • 23. 4.9 Successful ChangeAwareness Sufficient awareness of the need No Raise awareness and for change? overcome denial YesDiagnosis Thorough diagnosis of problems No Engage in root cause and/or opportunities? diagnosis YesVision Solid new organising model? No Engage in strategising and visioning YesPlan Detailed plan for implementation? No Engage in planning YesSupport Critical mass of support for No Engage in coalition building implementation? Yes Successful Change!!
  • 24. 5.1 Principles Issues1. Understanding the Psyche of Dysfunctionality and Change; 12. Dysfunctionality by Design;3. Eight school readiness components (SRC); 3 5 94. Data/information/knowledge/intelligent decision making; 6 85. Whole school development/ school improvement plan; 7 16 10 26. Professional development of teachers - closing the attitude, believes, thinking and skills gaps; 12 157. Champion/ leader driven;8. Expert and mentor support; 14 13 119. School level support;10. Networking/ partnering systems; 411. Compliance/ governance/ operational management/ leadership systems;12. Managing what you know (ICT); Purpose (Vision)13. Accountability commitments;14. Aligning the curriculum, instruction, teaching, learning, Hands (Action) assessment systems; Head (Systems)15. Time on task;16. Focus on the core - student achievements. Heart (Believes)
  • 25. 5.2 Conceptualising Dysfunctional Schools• Schools who continue to function, but do not accomplish the purpose for which they were created;• Schools exit to help each child realise his or her fullest potential as a human being;• Schools become dysfunctional when they stop serving the needs of the individual learners;• Schools can take on a life of their own where the main objective becomes self- preservation;• One of the key indicators that a school has become dysfunctional is the ‘no talk rule’. Those within the school are not permitted, and do not permit themselves, to speak (or even think) critically about the school;• Critical thinking begins with the question “Why?” Why are we doing this? Why are things arranged this way? Why do we do it this way and not that way? These kinds of questions are not allowed in a dysfunctional school;• The other indicator is the evolution of a ‘priestly caste’ who allegiance is more strongly tied to the school than it is to the learners the school is meant to serve - this means the teachers and principal within the school.
  • 26. 5.3 Operation of the NCS in schools • Working week Macro • Timetable time level School • Staffing numbers issues • Rooming • Class-size-ratio • Timetabling • Assessment - Recording - Reporting • Continuous Teacher Professional Development • Governance involvement Meso level Departments Learning Areas/Subjects issues Micro level Teacher * Planning * Time * Delivery * Testing issues
  • 27. 5.4 Career stages and CPTD
  • 28. Conditions Change:Outside-the-system approaches, applied inside the system Inside the District Outside the District Traditions in-district Increasingly Flexible operating conditions operating conditions Turn Around Schools • People - more authority over hiring, placement, compensation and work rules • Time - more scheduling authority like longer days, longer year • Money - more budget flexibility, more resources 5.5 Conditions Change • Programmes - more flexibility to shape programme to learners/ needs and turn-around priorities 28
  • 29. 6.1 Methodology & Participants Purposive sampling of Schools • Three characteristics - Majority of learner population coming from poverty stricken and disadvantaged communities (majority black learners); - An admissions policy that is not selective in nature (not choosing only high performing learners); - Be a high functioning school based on learner achievement (more than 75% of learners pass consistently in Matric); Data collection method • One-on-one interviews with principals - focusing on the profile of the school; • Focus group interviews with the principal and some of their deputy principals - focusing on the school readiness components;No School Province Participants Race + Classification Historical Educ. Dept1. RHS Gauteng 1. Principal White Females White (TED) 2. Deputy2. GBS Western Cape 1.Principal Coloured Male Coloured (HoR)3. MSS Western Cape 1.Principal 1. Indian Male 1. Indian (HoD) 2.Deputy 2. Coloured Male 2. Coloured (HOR)4. IPS Gauteng 1.Principal 1. African Female African (DET) 2.Deputy 2. African Male
  • 30. 6.2 Conceptualising the Problem1. Teacher supply Government and deployment;2. Teacher quality; Community3. Teacher development; School4. Image of the teachers;5. Resources; Classroom6. Social capital;7. Orphans and 9 vulnerable children; 2, 3, 5, 88. Discipline and authority; 4, 6, 7, 109. Learner pathways;10. Networking. 1
  • 31. 6.3 Devising and Testing the Strategy Outline of Strategy • Understanding Dysfunctionality • School Readiness Components • Testing SRC at 4 schools Testing strategy • Create awareness in districts Educational research “Political’ strategyQualitative Quantitative Opponents Decision- Allies• Why? • How many? makers• Teaching and • Size 30% >Learning Focus 80% Appoint Impressive Principals with T&L capabilities in High Turning Around Risk schools Impressive Leadership Dysfunctional School Strategy
  • 32. 6.4 What makes the four (4) schools different? Individual Relationships1. Recognise the high risk; 1. Utilise organisational strength;2. Think differently; 2. High commitment and expectation to3. Redefine ‘normal’ and ‘reality’; succeed;4. Know, understand and service ‘young 3. Recognise ability to transform and people’. change; 4. Teachers care deeply about all learners. Culture Systems efficiency1. ‘Bring it on!’ attitude; 1. Being ready (proactive);2. Adults who model what they value; 2. Always focus on the ‘key deliverables’;3. Teachers ‘don’t sweat the small stuff’; 3. Data driven decision-making;4. Teachers know ‘what it takes to be 4. Clear and implementable rules. successful’.
  • 33. 6.4.1 Individual
  • 34. 6.4.2 Relationships
  • 35. 6.4.3 Culture
  • 36. 6.4.4 Systems
  • 37. 7.1 Preliminary ImplementationPhase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4Buy-in Develop SRC + Implement SRC + Sustainability CMM CMM and close strategy Gaps• ACE - UP (2009-10) • ACE - UP (2009-10)• ACE - MGSLG • ACE - MGSLG (2008-9) (2008-9)• Lubombo Circuit• Gauteng East (14) • Gauteng East (14)• GDE (31) • GDE (31)Research Schools• RHS• IPS• MMS• GBS
  • 38. 7.2 Lubombo Circuit (Buy-in)• Circuit in Mpumalanga, bordering with Mozambique;• 34 Schools (both primary and secondary) attended the 2 days session;• Circuit manager was present for the entire two days;• After introductory questions were posed to schools (2.5 hours session), schools had to ‘self-identify’ at what level they are of school functionality;• 1 high; 17 under-performing; 16 dysfunctional.
  • 39. 7.3 GE UPS 14 schools
  • 40. 7.4 GE UPS Matric Results 2008-2010
  • 41. 7.5 SRC Full
  • 42. 7.6 GDE PPS AveImprovement in SRC
  • 43. 7.7 GDE PPS Ave SRC per school
  • 44. Gauteng Schools with challengesProject Manager Schools DivisionNo Grade 12 Results 2009 2008 Variance Up Down Same 1 35 49 14 1 2 3 4 7.8 GDE PPS Project 50 24 27 53 26 34 3 2 7 1 1 1 5 47 46 -1 1 6 46 73 27 1 7 26 46 20 1 8 29 38 9 1 9 38 39 1 1 10 48 38 -10 1 11 29 46 17 1 12 28 28 1 13 29 76 47 1 14 39 22 -17 1 15 48 66 18 1 16 29 52 23 1 17 33 68 35 1 18 30 65 35 1 19 12 30 18 1 20 27 39 12 1 21 30 16 -14 1 22 42 38 -4 1 23 51 46 -5 1 24 40 96 56 1 25 42 46 4 1 26 45 63 18 1 27 48 85 37 1 28 55 54 -1 1 29 55 51 -4 1 30 66 66 0 1 31 56 48 -8 1 Ave. 12.5 21 9 1 65.6% 28.1% 3.1% 44 Ave. 20.5 -7.1
  • 45. 7.9 SMS from GE school------ SMS ------From: +27826257426Received: Jan 13, 2011 11:15Subject: Dr Muavia Gallie ,Dr Muavia Gallie, the name of our school is AsserMaloka in Duduza(Nigel). When we joined yourprogramme were sitting @ 35%(2008), 49%(2009),and for 2010 we are @ 86.23%. My principal and Iwish to express our heartfelt gratitude to you andyour whole team. From Deputy Principal:FET.VuyoNcokazi.
  • 46. 7.10 GDE PPS Matric Results 2010 13 13 16 16
  • 47. 7.11 GDE PPS Matric Results2008 - 2010 (2010 ascending)
  • 48. 7.12 GDE PPS Matric Results 2008- 2010
  • 49. 8. Conclusion - Theory of ChangeFraming School Change ImprovementSocial/ Critical Features: In learner Educational OutcomesEmotional • Positive, expectations • Higher learnerIssues: nurturing teachers, and behaviour: achievement• Lack of self- leadership, • Higheresteem ‘connected”/ likelihood of• Identity ‘belonging’ successcrises philosophyAcademic Social/ Emotional Teaching and Adulthood Outcomes:Issues: programmes: Learning: • Citizenry• Lack of • Reward system • Cultural • Leadershiprelevancy to • Peer groups responsivenesslearners • Extra-mural • Affirming activities, etc. potential and possibilities
  • 50. ThankYou!!

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