Eiffel65
Dan Elg, Matt Huang,
Rachael Stedman, Sarah Waskom
Team Eiffel65
• Project Goal
• Our Greatest Challenge
• Prototype Demo
• Personas
• Design Decisions
• Usability Test Lear...
redesign the mbta kiosks
kiosk user goal
get from
point A…
…to
point B
purpose of mbta kiosks
I am at point A
and I want to get
to point B
Kiosk
Want  Need
Translation
Fare you need to
get to ...
disjoint user groups
what
regular
users need
what
infrequent
users need
financial
transaction
want to need
translation
use...
demo
personas
Chris the
Commuter
Ted the
Tourist
disjoint
Frankie the
Freshman
Sally the
Sporadic
in-focus
out-of-focus
Chris the Commuter
• Quickly add value
to CharlieCard
• Occasionally buy a
monthly pass
• Figure out
directions
• Determin...
design decisions
usability test learnings
usability test learnings
auto-appearing keyboard
merge screens
find address find station
find attraction
next steps
different experience for each
user type
“Most of our issues
were related to
recovering
from errors and/or
provi...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Design Refinement - MBTA Kiosk Redesign Project

1,040 views
884 views

Published on

This is the slide deck we used when giving our design refinement presentation for our Human Factors of Interface Design course at Olin College of Engineering.

Team Eiffel65:
Matt Huang
Dan Elg
Rachael Stedman
Sarah Waskom

Published in: Technology, Design
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,040
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
36
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Project Goal
    Our Greatest Challenge – our user groups are disjoint
    Prototype Demo – what we designed with our disjoint users
    Personas – why our user groups are disjoint
    Interaction Flow – How does our interface serve both user groups?
    Prototype changes – feedback from user groups, what changes we made for each

  • The MBTA's kiosks currently rely on a touchscreen interface for purchasing CharlieTickets, CharlieCards, and other public transportation fares. With the introduction of such kiosks and the CharlieCard, the MBTA has made strides in improving their customers' payment interaction flow, but many improvements remain to be realized. The processes of purchasing CharlieTicket, CharlieCard, and Commuter Rail passes require different transactions, and yet sometimes these transactions are very similar (e.g. adding money to a CharlieCard is akin to adding value to a CharlieTicket). With a multitude of fare options, it is difficult for kiosk users to determine how to obtain the correct fare medium with the correct amount. An improved interface would allow users to easily determine what tasks are necessary to accomplish their goal of reaching their destination.
  • The end-goal of each MBTA customer is to get from point A to point B. The purpose of the MBTA kiosk is to facilitate the financial transaction between the customer and the MBTA. In exchange for a payment made with cash, credit, or debit, a customer receives a fare-carrying medium which can then be redeemed for rides on the subway, bus, commuter rail, or boat.
  • The end-goal of each MBTA customer is to get from point A to point B. The purpose of the MBTA kiosk is to facilitate the financial transaction between the customer and the MBTA. In exchange for a payment made with cash, credit, or debit, a customer receives a fare-carrying medium which can then be redeemed for rides on the subway, bus, commuter rail, or boat.

    We solved this disjoint user problem by customizing the interface.
  • New users can easily compare and learn about different fare types
    Regular users can speed through the process by selecting their most frequently purchased fare amount from the options carousel
    New interaction flow minimizes the number of steps a user must take between selecting a fare and payment
  • Based on New/Infrequent Users:
    Eliminated physical scroll wheel, search by map, & search refinement by T line
    Made on-screen keyboard appear automatically
    Based on Regular Users:
    Dropped “behavior change” recommendations
  • Based on New/Infrequent Users:
    Eliminated physical scroll wheel, search by map, & search refinement by T line
    Made on-screen keyboard appear automatically
    Based on Regular Users:
    Dropped “behavior change” recommendations
  • Having two disparate user groups was a big challenge in designing our interface
    Our design accounts for each group by customizing the experience to meet group’s needs
    Design is simple but capable of all important functionality
    Next steps
    refine prototype based on heuristic evaluation feedback
    consider new ideas like voice-recognition for destination input

    Feedback from Heuristic Evaluation
    The general look‐and‐feel was very good. The
    idea of adding fares instead of monetary values is good. Most of our issues were related to recovering
    from errors and/or providing users with more control. In addition, a common action with a CharlieCard ‐
    merely checking the value on it without any other transaction ‐ appears to have been completely
    neglected.
  • Design Refinement - MBTA Kiosk Redesign Project

    1. 1. Eiffel65 Dan Elg, Matt Huang, Rachael Stedman, Sarah Waskom
    2. 2. Team Eiffel65 • Project Goal • Our Greatest Challenge • Prototype Demo • Personas • Design Decisions • Usability Test Learnings • Next Steps
    3. 3. redesign the mbta kiosks
    4. 4. kiosk user goal get from point A… …to point B
    5. 5. purpose of mbta kiosks I am at point A and I want to get to point B Kiosk Want  Need Translation Fare you need to get to point B I want this fare type and amount Kiosk Financial Transaction Fare you need to get to point B OR
    6. 6. disjoint user groups what regular users need what infrequent users need financial transaction want to need translation user interface tasks
    7. 7. demo
    8. 8. personas Chris the Commuter Ted the Tourist disjoint Frankie the Freshman Sally the Sporadic in-focus out-of-focus
    9. 9. Chris the Commuter • Quickly add value to CharlieCard • Occasionally buy a monthly pass • Figure out directions • Determine fare prices • Buy cheapest fare Ted the Tourist disjoint tasks
    10. 10. design decisions
    11. 11. usability test learnings
    12. 12. usability test learnings auto-appearing keyboard merge screens find address find station find attraction
    13. 13. next steps different experience for each user type “Most of our issues were related to recovering from errors and/or providing users with more control.“ -heuristic evaluation

    ×