BLEnDT© - Blended Learning Design Tool Workshop at City University London
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BLEnDT© - Blended Learning Design Tool Workshop at City University London

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The Blended Learning Design Tool (BLEnDT©) introduces an instructional framework for the design of blended learning approaches identifying the learning outcomes that lend themselves to interactive ...

The Blended Learning Design Tool (BLEnDT©) introduces an instructional framework for the design of blended learning approaches identifying the learning outcomes that lend themselves to interactive self-guided online learning following an Instructionist approach and the learning outcomes that are best suited for face to face delivery or online delivery following a Constructivist/Collaborative approach. For more information: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/elearning/blendt/

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  • Bloom (1956) developed a system or ‘Taxonomy’ to enable learning objectives to be planned and measured properly.Simpson’s version – addresses sensory and perceptionHarrow’s version – addresses movement, communication and body language
  • Bloom (1956) developed a system or ‘Taxonomy’ to enable learning objectives to be planned and measured properly.Simpson’s version – addresses sensory and perceptionHarrow’s version – addresses movement, communication and body language
  • The affective component addresses feelings of fear, hesitation, and uneasiness experienced before and while learning using iPads. On average, the students expressed a positive attitude (4/5) under this component showing confidence about the use of the iPads. The perceived usefulness component involves behavious arising from beliefs about the advantages of learning using iPads. On average the students expressed a border line attitute under the perceived usefuness component (3/5) with particularlly low scores under (Question 13: ‘most things that one can get from learning using iPads can be obtained or arrive at through other means’).  The perceived control component refers to one’s feelings and reactive behaviour while manipulating technological tools. On average, once again, the students expressed a positive attitude (4/5) under this component showing confidence about the use of the iPads. Finally, the behavioral component focuses on the behaviour manifested as willingness to use iPads for learning. In this component, the students expressed a positive attitude (4/5) showing willigness to use iPads for learning in the classroom (See Figure 3).

BLEnDT© - Blended Learning Design Tool Workshop at City University London BLEnDT© - Blended Learning Design Tool Workshop at City University London Presentation Transcript

  • © Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013Dr Maria Toro-Troconis15th May 2013#BLEnDTImperial
  • BLOOM’S TAXONOMY - LEARNING DOMAINS(Bloom 1956)PsychomotorCognitiveAffective© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • LEARNING DOMAINSPsychomotor: Skills (Bloom 1956; Dave, 1967; Simpson, 1966; Harrow, 1972)© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • LEARNING DOMAINSAffective: Attitude (Bloom et al, 1956; Bloom, Masia and Krathwohl, 1964)© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • LEARNING DOMAINSCognitive: Knowledge (Bloom, 1956 ; Anderson and Krathwhol, 2001)© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • LEARNING DOMAINSCognitive: KnowledgeFactual Procedural Conceptual MetacognitiveCognitive: Knowledge (Anderson and Krathwhol, 2001)© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • SMART LEARNING OUTCOMESSpecific – Measurable – Achievable –Relevant - Time scaled© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • BLENDT©BLEnDT© - Blended Learning Design Tool – Dr Maria Toro-Troconis
  • DEMOhttp://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/teaching/elearning/blendt/© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • Application of BLEnDT©Respiratory Muscles Tutorial (Year 1)supported by iPads© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • VIDEO© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • EVALUATION – MARCH 2013Bonnanno, P., & Kommers, M. P. A. (2008). Exploring the influence of gender and gaming competence onattitudes towards using instructional games. British Journal of Educational Technology 39(1):97–109© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • SCORES – ATTITUDINAL COMPONENTSBonnanno, P., & Kommers, M. P. A. (2008). Exploring the influence of gender and gaming competence onattitudes towards using instructional games. British Journal of Educational Technology 39(1):97–109© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • CURRENT USE OF BLENDT©• Faculty of Medicine – Imperial College London• Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine• The School of Health Sciences at City University London© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • ANYQUESTIONS?© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013
  • THANK YOUMaria Toro-Troconism.toro@imperial.ac.uk@mtorotro© Dr Maria Toro-Troconis – Imperial College London, 2013#BLEnDTImperial