Acoustics Unplugged

457 views
420 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
457
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Acoustics Unplugged

  1. 1. Rebecca ReichMay 24 2011
  2. 2.  Who am I? h Audio / Acoustics around the clock d d h l k
  3. 3. 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010  B. Eng, electrical, Minor Arts  NRC Women in Engineering and Science scholarship g g p • classroom and concert hall acoustics  S.M., Media Arts and Sciences  Cochlear implants hl l  how do they sound when music plays through them?
  4. 4. 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010  Programming 1’s and 0’s  Programming user software  Customer technical  support
  5. 5. 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010  One year in Copenhagen, DK  Customer technical support
  6. 6. 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010  Customer technical support (five months) C   h i l   (fi   h )  Manager, customer technical support team  China, Japan, Canada
  7. 7. 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 • Flexible • People jobwww.mitacs.ca • Learn new stuff!
  8. 8. •$7 500 industry 75 y $15 000 •$7 500 Mitacs/FQRNT $10 000 $5000min for student flexible •$36 000 industry $80 000 •$44 000 Mitacs/FQRNT $10 000 $10 000 $10 000 $20 000 $10 000 $10 000 $10 000 flexible internships
  9. 9. Let’s get started…Let’s get started
  10. 10.  Sound is a form of energy (like electricity or  f f light) Sound is made when air molecules vibrate  d d h l l b and move in a pattern waves Animation courtesy of Dr. Dan Russell, Kettering University
  11. 11. Particle motion is a function of space (displacement, amplitude)  and time
  12. 12. Longitudinal wave:  particle motion is parallel to motion of disturbance  created by moving object Wave causes areas of compression (high  pressure) and rarefaction (low pressure).  We  )  d  f i  (l   )   W   call this PRESSURE waves
  13. 13. c = 343m/s (air, 20oC) we INTERPRET sound waves
  14. 14. Frequency:   Fhow often the particles are moving back and forth:  # of complete back‐and‐forth vibrations p of a particle of the medium Hertz: per unit of time # cycles per second 20Hz – 20 000Hz H     H Sensation of frequency = pitch
  15. 15.  Greater amplitude of disturbance causes   G   li d   f di b   greater displacement (amplitude) of particles More amplitude  more energy Intensity = power/area (Watts/m2) Move away from sound ,intensity decreases  (inverse square) Humans can detect as low as 1*10‐12 W/m2, , and as high as 1 billion times this! Due to large range: dB 1*10‐12 W/m2  = 0 dB d
  16. 16. sleep work work wake play
  17. 17.  Your alarm‐clock radio: fast facts f f06:00  Why does Boston Acoustics sound better  than Accurian?
  18. 18. Looking at an average over a window of time…
  19. 19. Why does everyone sound good singing in the   Wh  d     d  d  i i  i  th shower?06:15 5  ACOUSTICS: study of waves in a medium  Direct, Reflected, Refracted, Absorbed fl d f d b b d
  20. 20.  Hard surfaces f  little sound absorbed (ceramic tile)  many reflections reverberation ~50ms is threshold for   i  th h ld f   hearing echo
  21. 21.  Small space  accumulation of reflections  increases volume  you sound more powerful! Resonant cavity  Shower stall dimensions  cause standing waves at  d low frequencies; vocals in  this range will be boosted
  22. 22.  Car stereo acoustics08:00  “dead” sound environment, depends on materials  (leather vs. upholstry)  transitory (windows open vs. closed)  loud: riding the volume knob
  23. 23.  Single‐band compressor, loud bass information  l b d l db f modulates gain of the entire audio signal  suboptimal maximum perceived loudness & gain  pumping
  24. 24.  Listening to iPod  [Portnuff] listening to earbuds for 90 minutes/day at  80% volume is probably safe for long‐term hearing  (softer is better: you can safely tune in at 70%  volume for about 4½ hours a day.) volume for about 4½ hours a day )~ one in five teenagers had some kind of hearing loss in 2005 2006, up from 15% of teenagers in the late 1980s and 2005‐2006, up from 15% of teenagers in the late 1980s and early 90s, according to a study of nearly 5,000 people age 12 to 19 published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
  25. 25.  The maximum exposure time for unprotected  Th   i    ti  f   t t d  ears per day at 90 dB is 8 hours.  For every 5 dB increase in volume  the maximum  For every 5 dB increase in volume, the maximum  exposure time is cut in half.  95 95 dB = 4 hours 4  100 dB = 2 hours  110 dB = 30 minutes  120 dB = 7.5 minutes Apple set 100dB limit in Europe, still 115dB in  USA
  26. 26.  Dynamic compression a reality of modern  f music recordings (louder is better) Causes listener fatigue l f
  27. 27. 08:45 45  In general, noise levels above 45‐50 dB(A) tend to be  I   l   i  l l   b    dB(A)  d   b   disturbing   Speech Intelligibility Index  (SII): how well speech can be  understood in the presence of noise. p  range: 0 (perfect privacy) to  (perfect intelligibility)   Theatres and auditoriums need high SII values, but offices  and other private locations need low SII  SII <= 0.2 gives employees speech privacy and blocks most  SII <= 0 2 gives employees speech privacy and blocks most  acoustical distractions
  28. 28.  Ceiling and floor C ili   d fl Partitions (partial‐height screens) Workstation and Occupant Orientation Lighting fixtures (flat vs grill) Noise Masking System
  29. 29.  Noise‐cancellation headphones N i ll ti  h d h  Active vs. Passive09:00 9  Active:  ▪ produce “anti‐noise” ▪ require battery ▪ cancel low‐frequency  continuous  cancel low frequency, continuous  sound actively, high‐frequency through  design  Passive ▪ physical block; works over wide range ▪ no battery ▪ weaker bass response (due to speaker  size)
  30. 30.  Your hearing… getting old…”eh?”18:00 • outer/middle ear conductive • often reversible • inner ear sensorineural • not reversible • can be age‐related  b   l t d
  31. 31.  Symptoms  Certain sounds seem overly loud  Difficulty hearing things in noisy areas  High‐pitched sounds such as "s" or  "th" are hard to distinguish from one  another  Mens voices are easier to hear than  womens.  Other peoples voices sound mumbled  p p 20% over 65 or slurred  Ringing in the ears 40% over 75  “I hear but I can’t understand”  80% nursing home  residents
  32. 32.  Not just amplifiers f  ex. frequency translation Adapt to environment  cocktail party effect Connected  bluetooth  bilateral communication
  33. 33.  36,000 people world‐ 36 000 people world wide received cochlear  implants over the last  two decades. t  d d FDA‐approved 1985  (adults), 1990 (children) Ad lt   Adults can now be     b   considered candidates if  they have severe‐to‐ profound hearing loss  f d h i  l   and understand less  than 50% of sentences  spoken to them k  t  th violin violin, processed
  34. 34. noises off! ff22:00

×