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Aspect of Learning and Theory Adult Learning
 

Aspect of Learning and Theory Adult Learning

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It based through the 2 journals that have the related between aspect of learning and theory of adult learning

It based through the 2 journals that have the related between aspect of learning and theory of adult learning

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    Aspect of Learning and Theory Adult Learning Aspect of Learning and Theory Adult Learning Presentation Transcript

    • CRITICAL REVIEW:ADULT LEARNING THEORY MHR 1053: PHILOSOPHY OF ADULT LEARNING MATAHATI MAHBOL MH101097
    • INTRODUCTION
    • Definition in Technical: A set of organized activities carried on by a wide variety of institutions for the Scholars: accomplishment of specific educational objectives.Lindeman (1926) 2 journal researchBryson (1936) has the concept ofVerner (1962) Adult LearningKnowles (1980) theory that beenCourtney (1989) pioneered byHoule (1996) Malcom Knowles.Merriam & Brockett(1997). Adult Learning
    • BIBLIOGRAPHIES
    • Boulton-Lewis, G. M., Wilss, L., & Mutch, S. (Jul., 1996). Teachers as Adult Learners: Their Knowledge of Their Own Learning and Implications for Teaching. Higher Education, 32 (1), 89-106. Springer. Retrieved on 2011, 9 October from World Wide Web: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3447898• Researchers from Australia• Professionalism : Teacher• Background Researchers have included the information regarding the assumption and their belief regarding adult learning. In addition, researchers want to compare the results that been obtained by the earlier researcher with other samples of students in higher education. By doing that research, researcher able to discuss and compare the results that have been made about adult learning.
    • Hartzell, J. D., Veerappan, G. R., Posley, K., Shumway, N. M., & Durning, S. J. (2009). Resident run journal club: A model based on the adult learning theory. Medical Teacher, 31(4), 156-161. doi:10.1080/01421590802516723• Researchers from USA• Professionalism : Doctor• Background They has aware the existing of the multiple format in the journal club for medical resident. Many residents did not satisfy with the current format. This research has adapted with the adult learning theory to emphasize an effective learning environment through the adult learning. After the implementation of the new journal club, residents feel more comfortable in expressing themselves and able to give the full commitment in implement the new format.
    • METHODOLOGY
    • Boulton-Lewis, G. M., Wilss, L., & Mutch, S. (Jul., 1996). Teachers as Adult Learners: Their Knowledge of Their OwnLearning and Implications for Teaching. Higher Education, 32 (1), 89-106. Springer. Retrieved on 2011, 9 October fromWorld Wide Web: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3447898 40 students as respondents in Bachelor of Education course. Student will asked at the It need to write beginning of class to write the a statement statement about learning under heading “YOUR The responses been categorized BELIEF according to SOLO levels, content ABOUTof the statement and comparison of LEARNING” content.
    • Hartzell, J. D., Veerappan, G. R., Posley, K., Shumway, N. M., & Durning, S. J. (2009). Resident run journal club: A model based on the adult learning theory. Medical Teacher, 31(4), 156- 161. doi:10.1080/01421590802516723 W 1: W 4: Journal clubJournal club occurs meeting Electronic version Select articles uploaded Notify presenters W 3: W 2: Email article to Email article to housetaff housestaff Help resident Invite staffprepare CAT MakerTimeline for journal club
    • RESULT
    • Boulton-Lewis, G. M., Wilss, L., & Mutch, S. (Jul., 1996). Teachers as Adult Learners: Their Knowledge of Their Own Learning and Implications for Teaching. Higher Education, 32 (1), 89-106. Springer. Retrieved on 2011, 9 October from World Wide Web: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3447898 SOLO Level Description NumberPresturctural No evidence of any knowledge of the process 0 involved in learningUnistructural Aspect of learning is understood and focused 3 onMultistructural Severel relevant independent aspects of 32 learning are presented. These no integrated into an overall structureRelational Relevant aspects of learning are integrated 5 into an overall structureExtended Abstract Integrated knowledge of learning is 0 generalized to a new domain
    • Main Sub Categories Key Term CategoriesBelief about • Knowledge • Informationlearning • Experience • Growth • Understanding • ComprhensionFactors • Motivation • Pressureinfluencing • Learning environment • Relaxedlearning • Life • CultureApproaches to • Styles • Cooperativelearning • Information processing • Senses • Cognitive • Repeat • Metacognitive • ReflectLearning • Skills and facts • Put into practiceoutcomes • Affective • Satisfaction • Understanding • Insight
    • Hartzell, J. D., Veerappan, G. R., Posley, K., Shumway, N. M., & Durning, S. J. (2009). Residentrun journal club: A model based on the adult learning theory. Medical Teacher, 31(4), 156-161. doi:10.1080/01421590802516723
    • ASPECT IN ADULT LEARNING THEORY
    • • The behaviourist movement in Definition psychology has looked to the use of experimental procedures to study behaviour in relation to the environment • Thorndike, Pavlov, Watson, Guthrie Learning Theory , Hull, Tolman, SkinnerBEHAVIORIST View of Learning Process • Change in behaviour Locus of learning • Stimuli in external environment • Produce behavioural Purpose in Education change in desired direction • Arranges environment to Educator’s role elicit desired response Manifestations in AL • Behavioural objectives • Competency -based education • Skill development and training
    • • Resonates deepest with the experience as an adult Definition learner. It focuses on the learner will find the meaning in what is being taught and being able to apply the new information to examine previous experience. • Koffka, Kohler, Lewin, Piaget, Learning Theory Ausubel, Bruner, GagneCOGNITIVE View of Learning Process • Internal mental process Locus of learning • Internal cognitive structuring Purpose in Education • Develop capacity and skills to learn better • Structures content of Educator’s role learning activity Manifestations in AL • Cognitive development • Intelligence, learning and memory as function of age • Learning how to learn
    • • It establish the perspectives Definition that an individual has the potential to grow, and further has the desire to grow. Learning Theory • Maslow, RogerHUMANIST • A personal act to fulfill View of Learning Process potential. Locus of learning • Affective and cognitive needs Purpose in Education • Become self-actualized, autonomous • Facilitates development of Educator’s role the whole person Manifestations in AL • Andragogy • Self-directed learning
    • • People learn from observing Definition other people. This approach is a blend of behavioural cognitive and environment frameworks. • Bandura, Lave and Wenger, Learning Theory SalomonSITUATIONAL View of Learning Process • Interaction /observation in social contexts. SOCIAL & • Learning is in relationship Locus of learning between people and environment. Purpose in Education • Full participation in communities of practice and utilization of resources • Works to establish Educator’s role communities of practice in which conversation and participation can occur. Manifestations in AL • Socialization • Social participation • Associationalism • Conversation
    • SOLO TAXONOMY
    • Provide the systematic way of describing how a Structure of the learner’s performanceObserved Learning grows in complexity Outcomes when mastering many tasks.
    • Simply acquiringPRE-STRUCTURAL bits of unconnected information, which have no organization and make no sense.
    • Simple andUNISTRUCTURAL obvious connections are made, but their significance is not grasped.
    • A number ofMULTISTRUCTURAL connections may be made, but the meta-connections between them are missed, as is their significance for the whole.
    • RELATIONAL Now able to appreciate the significance of the parts in relation to the whole
    • Making connections notEXTENDED ABSTRACT only within the given subject area, but also beyond it, able to generalize and transfer the principles and ideas underlying the specific instance.
    • THEORY TO PRACTICALKAUFMAN, D., 2003
    • Kaufman, 2003 (Theory to Practical)
    • CONCLUSION