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3 d 2 design principles

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part 2 of 3 introduction to three dimensional design for visual arts foundations

part 2 of 3 introduction to three dimensional design for visual arts foundations

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN
    DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN
    DESIGN
  • 2. HUMAN BEINGS HAVE AN INHERENT PHYSIOLOGICAL SPATIAL ORIENTATION IN TERMS OF THREE PRIMARY DIRECTIONS. WE PERCEIVE FORM AND SPACE RELATIVE TO THREE IMAGINARY PLANES OF REFERENCE: HORIZONTAL, VERTICAL AND DEPTH.MOVEMENT IS A CHANGE IN POSITION RELATIVE TO THESE PLANES OF REFERENCE.
    THREE PRIMARY DIRECTIONS
  • 3. HUMAN BEINGS HAVE AN INHERENT PHYSIOLOGICAL SPATIAL ORIENTATION IN TERMS OF THREE PRIMARY DIRECTIONS. WE PERCEIVE FORM AND SPACE RELATIVE TO THREE IMAGINARY PLANES OF REFERENCE: HORIZONTAL, VERTICAL AND DEPTH.MOVEMENT IS A CHANGE IN POSITION RELATIVE TO THESE PLANES OF REFERENCE.
    THREE PRIMARY DIRECTIONS
  • 4. DISPLACEMENT IS A CHANGE IN POSITION PARALLEL TO THE HORIZONTAL OR VERTICAL PLANES.
    ROTATION IS A CHANGE OF POSITION
    BY TURNING ABOUT A POINT OR AXIS.
    THREE PRIMARY DIRECTIONS
  • 5. LINE TO PLANE
    POINT TO LINE TO PLANE
    PROXIMATE
    DIMENSIONS ARE LINKED BY MOVEMENT (TIME)
    A POINT IN MOTION CREATES A LINE.
    A LINE MOVED PERPENDICULAR TO IT’S ORIENTATION CREATES A PLANE.
    A PLANE MOVED SIMILARLY CREATES A SOLID.
    THREE PRIMARY DIRECTIONS
  • 6. LINE TO PLANE
    PROXIMATE
    SPACE IS THE AREA WITHIN AND AROUND AN OBJECT. ALL OBJECTS ENGAGE AND HELP TO DEFINE THE SPACE AROUND THEM.
    SPACE
  • 7. LINE TO PLANE
    PROXIMATE
    SPACE IS NOT NOTHING. IT IS FILLED WITH ENERGY, VISUAL WEIGHT, TENSION, EXPECTATION AND SIGNIFICATION
    SPACE NEGATIVE SPACE
  • 8. LINE TO PLANE
    PROXIMATE
    SPACE IS NOT NOTHING. IT IS FILLED WITH ENERGY, VISUAL WEIGHT, TENSION, EXPECTATION AND SIGNIFICATION
    SPACE COMPRESSION AND EXPANSION
  • 9. LINE TO PLANE
    PROXIMATE
    SPACE COMPRESSION AND EXPANSION
  • 10. LINE TO PLANE
    PROXIMATE
    SPACE COMPRESSION AND EXPANSION
  • 11. LINE TO PLANE
    SHAPE/FORM/MOVEMENT
    PROXIMATE
    SHAPES ARE PLANER.
    FORMS ARE DIMESIONAL.
    CONTINUITY TRANSFORMS THE
    MOVEMENT OF SHAPES INTO FORMS.
    STABILITY AND DYNAMICS
  • 12. LINE TO PLANE
    VOLUME/MASS/WEIGHT
    PROXIMATE
    VOLUME IS THE VISUAL SPACE DEFINED BY A FORM.
    MASS IS THE VISUAL DENSITY OF A FORM.
    WEIGHT IS A NON-VISUAL, STRUCTURAL PROPERTY,
    A FUNCTION OF MATERIALS AND GRAVITY.
    STABILITY AND DYNAMICS
  • 13. LINE TO PLANE
    VOLUME/MASS/WEIGHT
    CONTINUITY, CLOSURE, MATERIALS, SCALE, COLOR, LIGHT
    STABILITY AND DYNAMICS